IB 131 General Human Anatomy Vocabulary

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Table of contents
8/27/07 Lecture 1 Organization of Body
8/29/07 Lecture 2 Skeletal System 1
8/31/07 Lecture 3 Skeletal System 2
9/5/07 Lecture 4 Skeletal System 3
9/7/07 Lecture 5 Skeletal System 4
9/10/07 Lecture 6 Skeletal System 5
9/12/07 Lecture 7 Skeletal System 6
9/14/07 Lecture 8 Skeletal, Muscular Systems
9/17/07 Lecture 9 Muscular System 1
9/19/07 Lecture 10 Muscular System 2
9/21/07 Lecture 11 Muscular System 3
9/24/07 Lecture 12 Hematology 1
9/26/07 Lecture 13 Hematology 2
9/18/06 Muscular System 2
9/20/06 Muscular System 3
9/22/06 Muscular System 4
11/8/06 Lecture 29 Eye
--- 8/27/07 Lecture 1 Organization of Body
Haversian system
Osteon Osteons (also called Haversian system in honor of Clopton Havers) are predominant
structures found in some lamellar or compact bone. Osteons are found in ...
Haversian canals Haversian canals (named after Clopton Havers) are a series of tubes around narrow
... diaphysis), structure (osteon/Haversian system, Haversian canals, ...
Bone Their main features are a haversian canal in the centre, surrounded by lamellae,
.... diaphysis), structure (osteon/Haversian system, Haversian canals, ...
sarcomere
Sarcomere A sarcomere is the basic unit of a muscle's cross-striated myofibril. Sarcomeres are
multi-protein complexes composed of three different filament systems. ...
Muscular system The smallest cross section of skeletal muscle is called a sarcomere which is the
functional unit within the cell. It extends from one Z line to the next ...
Desmin Desmin forms a scaffold around the Z-disk of the sarcomere and connects the Z-disk to
... [2] Through its connection to the sarcomere Desmin connects the ...
nephron
Nephron A nephron (from Greek ?????? (nephros) meaning "kidney") is the basic structural
and functional unit of the kidney. Its chief function is to regulate water ...
Juxtamedullary nephron A but juxtamedullary nephron is a type of nephron. The "medullary" is referring
to the renal medulla, while the "juxta" refers to the relative position of ...
User:Nephron The name Nephron comes from the structural unit of the kidney. I have an interest
in nephrology and started the Wikipedia Nephrology project. ...
ana
ANA Look up ana, Ana, ANA in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ana (Mother), a
character in the original Mother video game; Ana of East Anglia, ...
Pro-ana Pro-ana refers to a group or subculture that promotes or supports anorexia as a
lifestyle choice rather than an eating disorder. Most pro-ana material is ...
Santa Ana, California Santa Ana is the most populous city in Orange County, California and is the county
seat. It lies approximately 10 miles inland from the Pacific Ocean, ...
temnien
Did you mean tambien?
artery
Artery Arteries are muscular blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart. [1]
All arteries, with the exception of the pulmonary and umbilical arteries, ...
Common carotid artery In human anatomy, the common carotid artery is an artery that supplies the head
and neck with oxygenated blood; it divides in the neck to form the external ...
Pulmonary artery The pulmonary arteries carry blood from the heart to the lungs. They are the only
arteries (other than umbilical arteries in the fetus) that carry ...
carotid
Common carotid artery In human anatomy, the common carotid artery is an artery that supplies the head
and neck with oxygenated blood; it divides in the neck to form the external ...
Carotid endarterectomy Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is a surgical procedure used to correct carotid
stenosis (narrowing of the carotid artery lumen by atheroma), used particularly ...
Internal carotid artery In human anatomy, the internal carotid artery is a major artery of the head and
neck that helps supply blood to the brain. ...
uterus
Uterus The uterus or womb is the major female reproductive organ of most mammals,
including humans. One end, the cervix, opens into the vagina; ...
Artificial uterus In the field of ectogenesis, an artificial uterus (or womb) is a mechanism that
is used to grow an embryo outside of the body of a female organism that ...
Retroverted uterus Female internal reproductive anatomy. Uterus is in slightly anteverted position.
A retroverted uterus would be tilted further backwards. ...
hysteria
Hysteria Hysteria, or somatization disorder, is a diagnostic label applied to a state of
mind, one of unmanageable fear or emotional excesses. ...
Female hysteria Female hysteria was a formerly common medical diagnosis, made exclusively in
women, which is no longer recognized by modern medical authorities. ...
Hysteria (album) Hysteria is the fourth album by British hard rock band Def Leppard, released in
1987. It is the band's best-selling album to date, selling over 18 million ...
hysterectomy
Hysterectomy A hysterectomy (from the Greek word histera, meaning "womb") is the surgical
removal of the uterus, usually performed by a gynecologist. ...
Sex reassignment surgery female-to-male - Wikipedia, the free ... Hysterectomy without BSO in cisgendered women is sometimes referred to as a ...
Some transmen desire to have a hysterectomy/BSO because of a discomfort with ...
Oophorectomy Retaining the ovaries when a hysterectomy is performed is associated with ....
"Effects of natural menopause, hysterectomy, and oophorectomy on lumbar spine ...
uterus
Uterus The uterus or womb is the major female reproductive organ of most mammals,
including humans. One end, the cervix, opens into the vagina; ...
Artificial uterus In the field of ectogenesis, an artificial uterus (or womb) is a mechanism that
is used to grow an embryo outside of the body of a female organism that ...
Retroverted uterus Female internal reproductive anatomy. Uterus is in slightly anteverted position.
A retroverted uterus would be tilted further backwards. ...
penis
Penis The penis (plural penises, penes) is an external sexual organ of certain biologically
male organisms. The penis is a reproductive organ and, for mammals, ...
Carcinoma of the penis Penile cancer is a malignant growth found on the skin or in the tissues of the
penis, usually originating in the glans and/or foreskin. ...
Penis enlargement Penis enlargement procedures (sometimes referred to as "male enhancement procedures"
in spam email and television advertisements) are techniques alleged to ...
leukosystemic
Did you mean leukocytemia?
- regional
Regional Regional Air - a defunct airline formerly based in Kenya. ... Regional Air
Services - an airline based in the Czech Republic. ...
Regional airline "Regional Airlines" redirects here. For the French airline, see Régional. For the
Moroccan airline, see Regional Air Lines. ...
Regional science Regional science is a field of the social sciences concerned with analytical
approaches to problems that are specifically urban, rural, or regional. ...
histology
Histology Histology (from the Greek ?????) is the study of tissue sectioned as a thin slice,
using a microtome. It can be described as microscopic anatomy. ...
Category:Histology The main article for this category is Histology. ... Retrieved
from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Histology". Category: Anatomy ...
Fixation (histology) In the fields of histology, pathology, and cell biology, fixation is a chemical
process by which biological tissues are preserved from decay. ...
magnetic resonance imaging
Magnetic resonance imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), formerly referred to as magnetic resonance
tomography (MRT) and, in scientific circles and as originally marketed by ...
Functional magnetic resonance imaging - Wikipedia, the free ... Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the use of MRI to measure the
haemodynamic response related to neural activity in the brain or spinal cord ...
Category:Magnetic resonance imaging From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search. The main
article for this category is Magnetic resonance imaging. ...
(MRI)
Magnetic resonance imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), formerly referred to as magnetic ... In its
early years MRI was referred to as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI), ...
Functional magnetic resonance imaging - Wikipedia, the free ... Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the use of MRI to measure the
.... A slice of an MRI scan of the brain. The forehead is at the top ...
Diffusion MRI Diffusion MRI is a specific Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) modality that produces
in vivo images of biological tissues weighted with the local ...
functional resonance imaging
Functional magnetic resonance imaging - Wikipedia, the free ... Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the use of MRI to measure the
haemodynamic response related to neural activity in the brain or spinal cord ...
Magnetic resonance imaging Main article: Functional magnetic resonance imaging · A fMRI scan showing regions
of activation in orange, including the primary visual cortex ( ...
Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging - Wikipedia ... Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (efMRI) is a form of functional
Magnetic Resonance Imaging in which a series of fMRI images are ...
(fMRI)
Functional magnetic resonance imaging - Wikipedia, the free ... Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the use of MRI to ...
fMRI data (yellow) overlaid on an average of the brain anatomies of several humans ...
Functional neuroimaging PET, fMRI and NIRSI can measure localized changes in cerebral blood flow related
to neural activity. These changes are referred to as activations. ...
Magnetic resonance imaging Applications of T2* imaging include functional MRI (fMRI) or evaluation of .....
Functional MRI (fMRI) measures signal changes in the brain that are due to ...
medial - lateral
Upper extremity of tibia The upper extremity of the tibia (or proximal extremity) is large, and expanded
into two eminences, the medial condyle and lateral condyle. ...
Body of fibula The body of fibula presents four borders - the antero-lateral, the antero-medial,
the postero-lateral, and the postero-medial; and four surfaces - anterior, ...
Body of femur The linea aspera is a prominent longitudinal ridge or crest, on the middle third
of the bone, presenting a medial and a lateral lip, and a narrow rough, ...
proximal - distal
Anatomical terms of location As before, the terms "proximal" and "distal" can be used as relative ... Thus,
the "elbow" is proximal to the hoof, but distal to the "shoulder" in Figs. ...
Demonstrative Typically, one set of demonstratives is proximal, indicating objects close to
the speaker; English this; and the other series is distal, indicating objects ...
Interphalangeal articulations of hand - Wikipedia, the free ... "proximal interphalangeal joints" (PIP), those between the first (also called
proximal) and second (intermediate) phalanges; "distal interphalangeal joints" ...
parietal - visceral
Peritoneum The outer layer, called the parietal peritoneum, is attached to the abdominal wall.
The inner layer, the visceral peritoneum, is wrapped around the internal ...
Parietal pleura The pleural and pericardial cavities are exaggerated since normally there is no
space between parietal and visceral pleura and between pericardium and heart ...
Pleural cavity The pleural and pericardial cavities are exaggerated since normally there is no
space between parietal and visceral pleura and between pericardium and heart ...
--- 8/29/07 Lecture 2 Skeletal System 1
Broca’s area
Did you mean Broca's area?
Broca's area Petrides M, Cadoret G, Mackey S (2005). "Orofacial somatomotor responses in the
macaque monkey homologue of Broca's area". Nature 435: 1235?38. ...
Wernicke's area It is connected to Broca's area by a neural pathway called the arcuate fasciculus.
It also has connections to the primary auditory cortex, evidence for its ...
Carl Wernicke In order to speak, the meanings of words are sent from Wernicke?s area via the
arcuate fasciculus to Broca?s area, where morphemes are assembled. ...
medial
Medial Any commutative semigroup is a medial magma, and a medial magma has an identity
element if and only if it is a commutative monoid. An elementary example of ...
Medial meniscus The medial meniscus (internal semilunar fibrocartilage) is nearly semicircular
in form, a little elongated from before backward, and broader behind than in ...
Medial geniculate nucleus The Medial Geniculate Nucleus or Medial Geniculate Body (MGB) is part of the
auditory thalamus and represents the thalamic relay between the inferior ...
lateral
Lateral Lateral may refer to:. Lateral, an anatomical direction - see Human anatomical
terms · Lateral pass, type of pass in American and Canadian football ...
Lateral thinking Lateral thinking is a term coined by Edward de Bono, a Maltese psychologist,
physician and writer. It first appeared in the title of his book The Use of ...
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, sometimes called Lou Gehrig's Disease, Maladie
de Charcot or motor neurone disease) is a progressive, fatal, ...
proximal
Zone of proximal development Lev Vygotsky's notion of zone of proximal development (???? ?????????? ????????),
often abbreviated ZPD, is the gap between a learner's current or actual ...
Proximal stimulus In perception, the proximal stimulus refers to physical stimulation that is
available to be measured by an observer's sensory apparatus. ...
Proximal tubule Agonal resorption of the contents of the proximal tubular contents after interruption
of circulation in the capillaries surrounding the tubule often leads ...
torso
Torso Torso is an anatomical term for the central part of the human body from which
extend the neck and limbs. It is also referred to as the trunk. ...
Turning Torso HSB Turning Torso is a skyscraper in Malmö, Sweden, located on the Swedish side
of the Öresund strait. It was designed by the Spanish architect Santiago ...
Cleveland Torso Murderer Entry from publicly editable encyclopedia. Includes speculation about the killer's
identity and possible additional victims.
lumen
Lumen (unit) The lumen (symbol: lm) is the SI unit of luminous flux, a measure of the perceived
power of light. Luminous flux differs from radiant flux, the measure of ...
Lumen Jump to: navigation, search. Lumen can mean: ... Retrieved
from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lumen". Category: Disambiguation ...
Lumen (anatomy) On a larger scale, the interior of the gastrointestinal tract may also be referred
to as its lumen, and likewise the pathways of the bronchi in the lungs or ...
epithelial
Epithelium Other epithelial cells line the insides of the lungs, the gastrointestinal tract,
the reproductive and urinary tracts, and make up the exocrine and ...
Surface epithelial-stromal tumor Surface epithelial-stromal tumors are a class of ovarian neoplasms that may be
benign or malignant. Neoplasms in this group are thought to be derived from ...
Epithelial sodium channel The epithelial sodium channel (short: ENaC, also: sodium channel non-neuronal
1 (SCNN1) or amiloride sensitive sodium channel (ASSC)) is a membrane-bound ...
matrix
The Matrix The Matrix is a 1999 science fiction action film written and directed by Larry
and Andy Wachowski and starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne ...
Matrix Matrix, an originally Latin word now taken into numerous languages, is derived
from "mater" (mother). In the time of the Roman Empire it referred to an ...
The Matrix (series) The Matrix series is a media franchise consisting primarily of three films: The
Matrix, The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions. ...
granule cell
Granule cell In neuroscience, granule cells refer to tiny neurons (a type of cell) that are
around 10 micrometres in diameter. Granule cells are found within the ...
Granule (cell biology) In cell biology, a granule can be any structure barely visible by light microscopy.
The term is most often used to describe a secretory vesicle. ...
Golgi cell They receive excitatory input from mossy fibres, also synapsing on granule cells,
and parallel fibers, which are long granule cell axons. ...
cerebellum
Cerebellum The cerebellum (Latin: "little brain") is a region of the brain that plays an
important role in the integration of sensory perception and motor output. ...
Mossy fiber (cerebellum) Mossy fibers are one of the major inputs to cerebellum. There are many sources
of this pathway, the largest of which is the cortex, which sends input to the ...
Category:Cerebellum Jump to: navigation, search. The main article for this category is Cerebellum.
... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Cerebellum" ...
micron
Micron The term micron was officially sanctioned as part of the metric system from 1879
to 1967; Micron (wool) · Micrometre of mercury (µm Hg), a unit of pressure ...
Micrometre Some people (especially in astronomy and the semiconductor industry) use the old
name micron and/or the solitary symbol µ (both of which were official ...
Micron Technology Micron Technology ("Micron") NYSE: MU is a multinational company based in Boise,
Idaho, USA, best known for producing many forms of semiconductor devices. ...
pseudounipolar
Pseudounipolar neuron By definition a pseudounipolar neuron has one dendrite and one axon. Just as for
every neuron, the dendrite conducts nerve impulses toward the cell body, ...
Afferent nerve Afferent neurons are pseudounipolar neurons, that have a single long dendrite
... types (bipolar, pseudounipolar, multipolar, pyramidal, Purkinje, granule) ...
Sensory neuron types (bipolar, pseudounipolar, multipolar, pyramidal, Purkinje, granule).
Afferent nerve/Sensory nerve/Sensory neuron, GSA, GVA, SSA, SVA, fibers Ia, ...
squamous
Squamous cell carcinoma In medicine, squamous cell carcinoma is a form of cancer of the carcinoma type
that may occur in many different organs, including the skin, mouth, ...
Squamous epithelium In anatomy, squamous epithelium is an epithelium characterised by its most
superficial layer consisting of flat, scalelike cells called squamous cells. ...
Squamous metaplasia Squamous metaplasia refers to benign (non-cancerous) changes in the epithelial
linings of certain organs within the body. These cells assume a more squamous ...
capillaries
Capillary Blood flows from digestive system heart to arteries, which narrow into arterioles,
and then narrow further still into capillaries. After the tissue has been ...
Lymph capillaries Lymph capillaries or lymphatic capillaries are tiny thin-walled blood vessels
that are closed at one end and are located in the spaces between cells ...
Peritubular capillaries In the renal system, peritubular capillaries are tiny blood vessels that travel
along side nephrons allowing reabsorption and secretion between blood and ...
endothelial
Endothelium Endothelial cells are involved in many aspects of vascular biology, including:
... Endothelial dysfunction, or the loss of proper endothelial function, ...
Endothelial dysfunction Endothelial dysfunction is a physiological dysfunction of normal biochemical
processes carried out by the endothelium, the cells that line the inner surface ...
Vascular endothelial growth factor Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important signaling protein
involved in both vasculogenesis (the de novo formation of the embryonic ...
osteology
Osteology Osteology is the scientific study of bones. A subdiscipline of anthropology(US)
archeology(EU), osteology is a detailed study of the structure of bones, ...
Category:Osteology Osteology topics are those which refer to processes, methods, or analysis of fracture
... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Osteology" ...
List of images in Gray's Anatomy: II. Osteology - Wikipedia, the ... List of images in Gray's Anatomy: II. Osteology. From Wikipedia, the free
encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search. Contents. 1 introduction (Gray's s17) ...
carpal - carpus
Carpus 1 In other animals; 2 The carpus. 2.1 Mnemonics. 3 Common characteristics of the
carpal bones; 4 See also; 5 Additional images; 6 References ...
Palmar carpal arch The palmar carpal arch is an anatomical term that denotes the combination (anastomosis)
of two arteries: the palmar carpal branch of the radial artery and ...
Dorsal carpal branch of the radial artery - Wikipedia, the free ... The dorsal carpal branch of the radial artery (posterior radial carpal artery)
is a small vessel which arises beneath the extensor tendons of the thumb; ...
tarsal - tarsus
Tarsal Jump to: navigation, search. Tarsal could refer to:. tarsus (skeleton) (skeleton);
tarsi (eye) ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarsal" ...
Lateral tarsal artery Anterior tibial artery, dorsalis pedis artery and the muscles and bones of the
leg - anterior view. (Lat. tarsal very faintly labeled at bottom center.) ...
Arthropod leg Millipedes, centipedes and their relatives have seven-segmented legs, comprising
coxa, trochanter, prefemur, femur, tibia, tarsus, and a tarsal claw. ...
scapula
Scapula In anatomy, the scapula, or shoulder blade, is the bone that connects the
humerus (arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone). ...
Publius Ostorius Scapula Publius Ostorius Scapula (died 52) was a Roman statesman and general who governed
Britain from 47 until his death, and was responsible for the defeat and ...
Winged scapula Winged scapula is a condition in which the medial border (the side nearest the
spine) of a person's scapula is abnormally positioned laterally and ...
clavicle
Clavicle In human anatomy, the clavicle or collar bone is classified as a long bone that
makes up part of the shoulder girdle (pectoral girdle). ...
Clavicle fracture Clavicle fractures involve approximately 5% of all fractures seen in hospital
emergency admissions. It is most commonly fractured between the proximal 2/3 ...
Costal tuberosity of clavicle On the medial part of the clavicle is a broad rough surface, the costal
tuberosity (impression for costoclavicular ligament), rather more than 2 cm. in ...
cranium
Cranium (board game) Cranium? is a party board game, invented by Whit Alexander and Richard Tait in
1998 and manufactured by Cranium, Inc. Cranium is billed as "The Game for ...
Skull The skull can be subdivided into two parts: the cranium and the mandible. A skull
that is missing a mandible is only a cranium; this is the source of a very ...
Cranium Command Cranium Command is an attraction at the Wonders of Life pavilion at Walt Disney
World Resort's Epcot theme park. It premiered on October 19, 1989; ...
parietal
Parietal lobe The parietal lobe is a lobe in the brain. It is positioned above (superior to)
the occipital lobe and behind (posterior to) the frontal lobe. ...
Parietal Parietal eye, "third eye" of some animal species. The term may also refer to an
extension of bone ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parietal" ...
Parietal cell Parietal cells produce gastric acid (hydrochloric acid) in response to histamine (via
H2 receptors), acetylcholine (M3 receptors) and gastrin (CCK2 ...
frontal
Frontal lobe The frontal lobe is an area in the brain of mammals. Located at the front of each
cerebral hemisphere, frontal lobes are positioned in front of (anterior ...
Frontal bone The frontal bone is a bone in the human skull that resembles a cockleshell ...
diploic tissue is absent in the regions occupied by the frontal air sinuses. ...
Frontal vein The frontal vein begins on the forehead in a venous plexus which communicates
with the frontal branches of the superficial temporal vein. ...
vertebra (ae)
Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Dinosaurs/Archive 8 - Wikipedia, the ... It is known from only one vertebra, which is in poor condition. It was not placed
on George O.'s List of ... Skeletons ae fairly concrete and unchanging. ...
History of the Kansas City Chiefs ... suffered a fractured vertebra in his neck in a pre-season game against ......
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ...
Stirling Moss 1954 · Equipe Moss/AE Moss · Maserati 250F · Maserati .... breaking both legs,
nose and crushing 9th vertebra when wheel came off..."). ...
sacrum
Sacrum The sacrum is a large, triangular bone at the base of the spine and at the upper
and back part of the pelvic cavity, where it is inserted like a wedge ...
Canticum Sacrum Canticum Sacrum ad Honorem Sancti Marci Nominis is a 17-minute choral-orchestral
piece composed in 1955 by Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) in tribute "To the ...
O Sacrum Convivium O Sacrum Convivium is a Latin prose text honoring the Blessed Sacrament. It was
written by Saint Thomas Aquinas. It was included in the Catholic liturgy as ...
coccyx
Coccyx The coccyx (Latin: os coccygis) (pronounced kok-siks), commonly referred to as
the tailbone, is the final segment of the human vertebral column, ...
Coccydynia Coccydynia is a medical term meaning pain in the coccyx or tailbone area, ...
Coccydynia is also known as coccygodynia, coccygeal pain, coccyx pain, ...
Sacrum The apex (apex oss. sacri) is directed downward, and presents an oval facet for
articulation with the coccyx. The vertebral canal (canalis sacralis; ...
maxilla
Maxilla The maxilla is a fusion of two bones along the palatal fissure that form the
upper jaw. This is similar to the mandible, which is also a fusion of two ...
Alveolar process of maxilla On the maxilla, the alveolar process is a ridge on the inferior surface, and on
the mandible it is a ridge on the superior surface. ...
Zygomatic process of maxilla The zygomatic process of the maxilla (malar process) is a rough triangular
eminence, situated at the angle of separation of the anterior, zygomatic, ...
mandible
Mandible This article is about the human bone. For the arthropod mandibles, see
mandible (arthropod). For mandible, see Mandible (disambiguation). ...
Mandible (insect) Insect mandibles are a pair of appendages near the insect?s mouth, and the most
anterior of the three pairs of oral appendages (the labrum is more anterior, ...
Mandible claw The Mandible Claw is a professional wrestling maneuver which, when applied
correctly against an individual, can cause intense, legitimate pain. ...
sphenoid
Sphenoid bone The sphenoid bone (from Greek sphenoeides, "wedgelike") is a bone situated at
the base of the skull in front of the temporals and basilar part of the ...
Sphenoidal sinuses The sphenoidal sinuses (or sphenoid) contained within the body of the sphenoid
vary in size and shape; owing to the lateral displacement of the intervening ...
Ossification of the sphenoid Until the seventh or eighth month of fetal life the body of the sphenoid consists
of two parts: one in front of the tuberculum sellæ, the presphenoid, ...
ethmoid
Ethmoid bone The ethmoid bone (from Greek ethmos, "sieve") is a bone in the skull that separates
the nasal cavity from the brain. As such, it is located at the roof of ...
Ethmoid sinus Each ethmoid sinus is an air-space enclosed within the ethmoid bone. The ethmoidal
air cells consist of numerous thin-walled cavities situated in the ...
Ethmoid bulla On the lateral wall of the middle meatus is a curved fissure, the hiatus semilunaris,
limited below by the edge of the uncinate process of the ethmoid and ...
pterygoid
Pterygoid Pterygoid (from the Greek for 'winglike') can refer to:. a plate near the Vomer
bone; a muscle such as Lateral pterygoid muscle or Medial pterygoid muscle ...
Pterygoid fossa The pterygoid fossa is an anatomical term for the fossa formed by the divergence
of the lateral pterygoid plate and the medial pterygoid plate of the ...
Medial pterygoid muscle The insertion joins the masseter muscle to form a common tendinous sling which
allows the medial pterygoid and masseter to be powerful elevators of the jaw. ...
calcified matrix
Endochondral ossification At this point, blood vessels penetrate this calcified matrix, bringing in osteoblasts.
The osteoblasts use the calcified cartilage matrix as a template to ...
Ossification center Thus there are longitudinal groups of the cartilage cells enclosed in oblong
cavities, the walls of which are formed of calcified matrix which cuts off all ...
Cartilage Adult articular calcified cartilage is penetrated by vascular buds, ... The matrix
of cartilage acts as a barrier, preventing the entry of lymphocytes or ...
hydroxyapatite
Hydroxylapatite Hydroxylapatite, also frequently called hydroxyapatite, is a mineral. ...
Unlike hydroxyapatite, which is said to be ?osteoconductive? by conducting new ...
Bone sialoprotein PMID 15703183; ^ Tye, C.E., Rattray, K.R., Warner, K.J., Gordon, J.A., Sodek,
J., Hunter, G.K., Goldberg, H.A. Delineation of the hydroxyapatite-nucleating ...
Diagenesis [5] Due to the increase in porosity of bones through collagen loss, the bone
becomes susceptible to hydrolytic infiltration where the hydroxyapatite, ...
resilient
Resilience A resilient ecosystem can withstand shocks and rebuild itself when necessary.
Resilience in social systems has the added capacity of humans to anticipate ...
Infrastructure for Resilient Internet Systems - Wikipedia, the ... Infrastructure for Resilient Internet Systems (IRIS), is a decentralized
infrastructure using distributed hash tables that will enable large-scale ...
Resilient Packet Ring Resilient Packet Ring (RPR), also known as IEEE 802.17, is a standard designed
for the optimized transport of data traffic over fiber rings. ...
hemopoietic
Did you mean hematopoietic?
Hematopoietic stem cell From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search. Note that
some complexity is omitted from the diagram. Lymphocytes come from "Lymphoid" ...
Hemopoietic growth factors Hemopoietic growth factors regulate the differentiation and proliferation of
particular progenitor cells. Made available through recombinant DNA technology, ...
Haematopoiesis Haematopoiesis (from Ancient Greek: haima blood; poiesis to make) (or hematopoiesis
in the United States; sometimes also haemopoiesis or hemopoiesis) is the ...
hemopoiesis
Haematopoiesis Haematopoiesis (from Ancient Greek: haima blood; poiesis to make) (or hematopoiesis
in the United States; sometimes also haemopoiesis or hemopoiesis) is the ...
Normoblast Erythropoiesis · Hemopoiesis · Pluripotential hemopoietic stem cell ... Histology at
BU 01804loa - "Bone Marrow and Hemopoiesis bone marrow smear, ...
Band cell band+cell at eMedicine Dictionary; Histology at BU 01807loa - "Bone Marrow and
Hemopoiesis: bone marrow smear, neutrophil series"; c_18/12222660 at ...
ilium
Ilium (novel) Ilium is a science fiction novel by Dan Simmons, the first part of the Ilium/Olympus
cycle, concerning the re-creation of the events in the Iliad on Mars. ...
Ilion (disambiguation) Ilion or Ilium may refer to:. Ilion or Ilium, alternative names for the legendary
city of Troy · Ilio, Greece, a suburb of Athens, Greece, also known as Nea ...
Ilium (bone) The ilium of the pelvis is divisible into two parts, the body and the ala; the
separation is indicated on the internal surface by a curved line, ...
sternum
Sternum The sternum (from Greek ???????, sternon, "chest") or breastbone is a long, flat
bone located in the center of the thorax (chest). ...
Body of sternum The body of the sternum (gladiolus), considerably lengthier, narrower, and thinner
than the manubrium, attains its greatest breadth close to the lower end. ...
Sternum (arthropod) The sternum (pl. "sterna") is the ventral portion of a segment of an arthropod
thorax or abdomen. In insects, the sterna are usually single, large sclerites ...
humerus
Humerus The humerus is a long bone in the arm or fore-legs (animals) that runs from the
shoulder to the elbow. On a skeleton, it fits between the scapula and the ...
Upper extremity of humerus The upper extremity of the humerus (proximal humerus) consists of a large rounded
head joined to the body by a constricted portion called the neck, ...
Trochlea of humerus The medial portion of the articular surface of the humerus is named the trochlea,
and presents a deep depression between two well-marked borders; ...
radius
RADIUS Remote Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS) is an AAA (authentication,
authorization and accounting) protocol for applications such as network ...
Radius In classical geometry, a radius (plural: radii) of a circle or sphere is any line
segment from its center to its perimeter. By extension, the radius of a ...
Radius (bone) The radius is the bone of the forearm that extends from the outside of the limb
to the phlangx (lateral) of the elbow to the thumb side of the wrist. ...
ulna
Ulna The ulna (elbow bone) is a long bone, prismatic in form, placed at the medial
side of the forearm, parallel with the radius. ...
Lower extremity of ulna The lower extremity of the ulna (or distal extremity) is small, and presents two
eminences; the lateral and larger is a rounded, articular eminence, ...
Coronoid process of the ulna At the junction of this surface with the front of the body is a rough eminence,
the tuberosity of the ulna, which gives insertion to a part of the ...
metacarpals
Metacarpus Besides their phalangeal articulations, the metacarpal bones articulate as follows:
... Multiple fractures of the metacarpals (aka broken hand). Hand bones ...
Equine forelimb anatomy The large third metacarpal (informally the cannon or shin bone) provides the
major support of ... These smaller metacarpals are often called splint bones. ...
Dorsal interossei of the hand They are specified as 'dorsal' to contrast them with the palmar interossei, which
are located on the anterior side of the metacarpals. ...
phalanges
Phalanx bones The name Phalanges is commonly given to the bones that form fingers and toes.
... The term phalanx or phalanges refers to an ancient Greek army formation in ...
Intermediate phalanges Intermediate phalanges are bones found in the limbs of most vertebrates. In humans,
they are the bones of the finger and toe which lie in the middle, ...
Distal phalanges Distal phalanges (single distal phalanx) are bones found in the limbs of most
vertebrate skeletons. In humans, they are the finger bones located furthest ...
femur
Femur The femur or thigh bone is the longest, most voluminous, and strongest bone of
the mammalian bodies. It forms part of the hip and part of the knee. ...
Femur neck The femur neck is a flattened pyramidal process of bone, connecting the head with
the body, and forming with the latter a wide angle opening medialward. ...
Lower extremity of femur The lower extremity of the femur (or distal extremity), larger than the upper
extremity of femur, is somewhat cuboid in form, but its transverse diameter is ...
tibia
Tibia The tibia or shin bone, in human anatomy, is found medial (towards the middle)
and anterior (towards the front) to the other such bone, the fibula. ...
Tibia (computer game) Encyclopedia article describing the game and its history.
Body of tibia The body of the tibia has three borders and three surfaces. ... for the attachment
of the interosseous ligament connecting the tibia and fibula. ...
fibula
Fibula The fibula or calf bone is a bone located on the lateral side of the tibia, with
which it is connected above and below. It is the smaller of the two bones, ...
Praeneste fibula The Praeneste fibula or Præneste fibula (the "brooch of Palestrina") is a golden
brooch that was once thought to be the earliest surviving specimen of the ...
Body of fibula The body of fibula presents four borders - the antero-lateral, the antero-medial,
the postero-lateral, and the postero-medial; and four surfaces - anterior, ...
--- 8/31/07 Lecture 3 Skeletal System 2
hemopoiesis
Haematopoiesis Haematopoiesis (from Ancient Greek: haima blood; poiesis to make) (or hematopoiesis
in the United States; sometimes also haemopoiesis or hemopoiesis) is the ...
Normoblast Erythropoiesis · Hemopoiesis · Pluripotential hemopoietic stem cell ... Histology at
BU 01804loa - "Bone Marrow and Hemopoiesis bone marrow smear, ...
Band cell band+cell at eMedicine Dictionary; Histology at BU 01807loa - "Bone Marrow and
Hemopoiesis: bone marrow smear, neutrophil series"; c_18/12222660 at ...
ilium
Ilium (novel) Ilium is a science fiction novel by Dan Simmons, the first part of the Ilium/Olympus
cycle, concerning the re-creation of the events in the Iliad on Mars. ...
Ilion (disambiguation) Ilion or Ilium may refer to:. Ilion or Ilium, alternative names for the legendary
city of Troy · Ilio, Greece, a suburb of Athens, Greece, also known as Nea ...
Ilium (bone) The ilium of the pelvis is divisible into two parts, the body and the ala; the
separation is indicated on the internal surface by a curved line, ...
sternum
Sternum The sternum (from Greek ???????, sternon, "chest") or breastbone is a long, flat
bone located in the center of the thorax (chest). ...
Body of sternum The body of the sternum (gladiolus), considerably lengthier, narrower, and thinner
than the manubrium, attains its greatest breadth close to the lower end. ...
Sternum (arthropod) The sternum (pl. "sterna") is the ventral portion of a segment of an arthropod
thorax or abdomen. In insects, the sterna are usually single, large sclerites ...
humerus
Humerus The humerus is a long bone in the arm or fore-legs (animals) that runs from the
shoulder to the elbow. On a skeleton, it fits between the scapula and the ...
Upper extremity of humerus The upper extremity of the humerus (proximal humerus) consists of a large rounded
head joined to the body by a constricted portion called the neck, ...
Trochlea of humerus The medial portion of the articular surface of the humerus is named the trochlea,
and presents a deep depression between two well-marked borders; ...
radius
RADIUS Remote Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS) is an AAA (authentication,
authorization and accounting) protocol for applications such as network ...
Radius In classical geometry, a radius (plural: radii) of a circle or sphere is any line
segment from its center to its perimeter. By extension, the radius of a ...
Radius (bone) The radius is the bone of the forearm that extends from the outside of the limb
to the phlangx (lateral) of the elbow to the thumb side of the wrist. ...
ulna
Ulna The ulna (elbow bone) is a long bone, prismatic in form, placed at the medial
side of the forearm, parallel with the radius. ...
Lower extremity of ulna The lower extremity of the ulna (or distal extremity) is small, and presents two
eminences; the lateral and larger is a rounded, articular eminence, ...
Coronoid process of the ulna At the junction of this surface with the front of the body is a rough eminence,
the tuberosity of the ulna, which gives insertion to a part of the ...
carpal- carpus
Carpus 1 In other animals; 2 The carpus. 2.1 Mnemonics. 3 Common characteristics of the
carpal bones; 4 See also; 5 Additional images; 6 References ...
Palmar carpal arch The palmar carpal arch is an anatomical term that denotes the combination (anastomosis)
of two arteries: the palmar carpal branch of the radial artery and ...
Dorsal carpal branch of the radial artery - Wikipedia, the free ... The dorsal carpal branch of the radial artery (posterior radial carpal artery)
is a small vessel which arises beneath the extensor tendons of the thumb; ...
phalange
Phalanx bones "Phalanges" redirects here. For the Lebanese Phalange, see the Kataeb Party ...
The name Phalanges is commonly given to the bones that form fingers and toes ...
Kataeb Party The influence of the Phalangists was very limited in the early years of Lebanon's
independence, but came to prominence as a strong ally of the government in ...
Phalangist Party From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search. Phalangist Party
can refer to:. Falange · Phalangist Party (Lebanon) ...
femur
Femur The femur or thigh bone is the longest, most voluminous, and strongest bone of
the mammalian bodies. It forms part of the hip and part of the knee. ...
Femur neck The femur neck is a flattened pyramidal process of bone, connecting the head with
the body, and forming with the latter a wide angle opening medialward. ...
Lower extremity of femur The lower extremity of the femur (or distal extremity), larger than the upper
extremity of femur, is somewhat cuboid in form, but its transverse diameter is ...
tibia
Tibia The tibia or shin bone, in human anatomy, is found medial (towards the middle)
and anterior (towards the front) to the other such bone, the fibula. ...
Tibia (computer game) Encyclopedia article describing the game and its history.
Body of tibia The body of the tibia has three borders and three surfaces. ... for the attachment
of the interosseous ligament connecting the tibia and fibula. ...
fibula
Fibula The fibula or calf bone is a bone located on the lateral side of the tibia, with
which it is connected above and below. It is the smaller of the two bones, ...
Praeneste fibula The Praeneste fibula or Præneste fibula (the "brooch of Palestrina") is a golden
brooch that was once thought to be the earliest surviving specimen of the ...
Body of fibula The body of fibula presents four borders - the antero-lateral, the antero-medial,
the postero-lateral, and the postero-medial; and four surfaces - anterior, ...
metatarsal
Metatarsus The base of each metatarsal bone articulates with one or more of the tarsal bones,
... The metatarsal bones are often broken by soccer players, ...
Fourth metatarsal bone The fourth metatarsal bone is smaller in size than the third; its base presents
an oblique quadrilateral surface for articulation with the cuboid; ...
Fifth metatarsal bone The base articulates behind, by a triangular surface cut obliquely in a transverse
direction, with the cuboid; and medially, with the fourth metatarsal. ...
tarsal - tarsus
Tarsal Jump to: navigation, search. Tarsal could refer to:. tarsus (skeleton) (skeleton);
tarsi (eye) ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarsal" ...
Lateral tarsal artery Anterior tibial artery, dorsalis pedis artery and the muscles and bones of the
leg - anterior view. (Lat. tarsal very faintly labeled at bottom center.) ...
Arthropod leg Millipedes, centipedes and their relatives have seven-segmented legs, comprising
coxa, trochanter, prefemur, femur, tibia, tarsus, and a tarsal claw. ...
scapula
Scapula In anatomy, the scapula, or shoulder blade, is the bone that connects the
humerus (arm bone) with the clavicle (collar bone). ...
Publius Ostorius Scapula Publius Ostorius Scapula (died 52) was a Roman statesman and general who governed
Britain from 47 until his death, and was responsible for the defeat and ...
Winged scapula Winged scapula is a condition in which the medial border (the side nearest the
spine) of a person's scapula is abnormally positioned laterally and ...
clavicle
Clavicle In human anatomy, the clavicle or collar bone is classified as a long bone that
makes up part of the shoulder girdle (pectoral girdle). ...
Clavicle fracture Clavicle fractures involve approximately 5% of all fractures seen in hospital
emergency admissions. It is most commonly fractured between the proximal 2/3 ...
Costal tuberosity of clavicle On the medial part of the clavicle is a broad rough surface, the costal
tuberosity (impression for costoclavicular ligament), rather more than 2 cm. in ...
sacrum
Sacrum The sacrum is a large, triangular bone at the base of the spine and at the upper
and back part of the pelvic cavity, where it is inserted like a wedge ...
Canticum Sacrum Canticum Sacrum ad Honorem Sancti Marci Nominis is a 17-minute choral-orchestral
piece composed in 1955 by Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) in tribute "To the ...
O Sacrum Convivium O Sacrum Convivium is a Latin prose text honoring the Blessed Sacrament. It was
written by Saint Thomas Aquinas. It was included in the Catholic liturgy as ...
coccyx
Coccyx The coccyx (Latin: os coccygis) (pronounced kok-siks), commonly referred to as
the tailbone, is the final segment of the human vertebral column, ...
Coccydynia Coccydynia is a medical term meaning pain in the coccyx or tailbone area, ...
Coccydynia is also known as coccygodynia, coccygeal pain, coccyx pain, ...
Sacrum The apex (apex oss. sacri) is directed downward, and presents an oval facet for
articulation with the coccyx. The vertebral canal (canalis sacralis; ...
ossicles
Ossicles The ossicles (also called auditory ossicles) are the three smallest bones in the
human body. They are contained within the middle ear space and serve to ...
Evolution of mammalian auditory ossicles - Wikipedia, the free ... The evolution of mammalian auditory ossicles, that is, of the bones in the middle
ear, from the jaw bones of reptiles is one of the most well-documented and ...
Ossicles The ossicles (also called auditory ossicles) are the three smallest bones in the
human body. They are contained within the middle ear space and serve to ...
hyoid
Hyoid bone The hyoid bone (Lingual Bone) is a bone in the human neck, and is the only bone
in the skeleton not articulated to any other bone. ...
Hyoid bone The hyoid bone (Lingual Bone) is a bone in the human neck, and is the only bone
in the skeleton not articulated to any other bone. ...
Hyoid arch Hyoid arch. Head end of human embryo, about the end of the fourth week. Floor of
pharynx of embryo. (Second arch visible near center.) ...
thoracic cavity
Thoracic cavity The thoracic cavity (or chest cavity) is the chamber of the human body (and other
animal bodies) that is protected by the thoracic wall (thoracic cage and ...
Thoracic diaphragm It is crucial in respiration: in order to draw air into the lungs, the diaphragm
contracts, thus enlarging the thoracic cavity and reducing intra-thoracic ...
Thoracic cavity The thoracic cavity (or chest cavity) is the chamber of the human body (and other
animal bodies) that is protected by the thoracic wall (thoracic cage and ...
pectoral girdle
Pectoral girdle The pectoral girdle is the set of bones which connect the upper limb to the axial
skeleton on each side. It consists of the clavicle and scapula in humans ...
Image:Pectoral girdle front diagram.svg - Wikipedia, the free ... The pectoral girdle is the set of bones which connect the upper limb to the axial
skeleton on each side. It consists of the clavicle and scapula in humans ...
Image:Pectoral girdle front diagram.svg-en.html - Wikipedia, the ... Image:Pectoral girdle front diagram.svg-en.html. From Wikipedia, the free
encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search. No file by this name exists; ...
pelvic girdle
Pelvic girdle pain Historical articles show that pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain has been
recognizes for centuries. Mentioned by Hippocrates [1] and later described in ...
Pelvis ... the socket portion of the hip joint for each leg (in bipeds) or hind leg (in
quadrupeds). It forms the lower limb (or hind-limb) girdle of the skeleton. ...
Triradiate pelvic girdle The Triradiate pelvic girdle is a shared feature common to archosaurs. The pelvis
has three prongs, with an elongate pubis and ischium. ...
ischium
Ischium (bone) The ischium forms the lower and back part of the hip bone. It is situated below
the ilium. The word comes from the Greek ischion, meaning "hip. ...
Body of ischium From its posterior border there extends backward a thin and pointed triangular
eminence, the ischial spine, more or less elongated in different subjects. ...
Ischial spine From the posterior border of the body of the Ischium there extends backward a
thin and pointed triangular eminence, the ischial spine, ...
pubis - pubic bone
Pubis (bone) In the female, the pubic bone is anterior to the urethral sponge. The left and
right hip bones join at the pubic symphysis. ...
Osteitis pubis The cause of osteitis pubis is excessive physical strain on the pubic bone,
usually caused by the increasing rigorous demands of competitive sport, ...
Mons pubis This pushes the forward portion of the labia majora out and away from the pubic
bone, and parallel to the ground (when standing). ...
frontal
Frontal lobe The frontal lobe is an area in the brain of mammals. Located at the front of each
cerebral hemisphere, frontal lobes are positioned in front of (anterior ...
Frontal bone The frontal bone is a bone in the human skull that resembles a cockleshell ...
diploic tissue is absent in the regions occupied by the frontal air sinuses. ...
Frontal vein The frontal vein begins on the forehead in a venous plexus which communicates
with the frontal branches of the superficial temporal vein. ...
parietal
Parietal lobe The parietal lobe is a lobe in the brain. It is positioned above (superior to)
the occipital lobe and behind (posterior to) the frontal lobe. ...
Parietal Parietal eye, "third eye" of some animal species. The term may also refer to an
extension of bone ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parietal" ...
Parietal cell Parietal cells produce gastric acid (hydrochloric acid) in response to histamine (via
H2 receptors), acetylcholine (M3 receptors) and gastrin (CCK2 ...
temporal
Temporal Temporal database, a database recording aspects of time varying values; The Temporal
power of the Popes of the Roman Catholic Church; a Lord Temporal, ...
Temporal lobe The temporal lobes are part of the cerebrum. They lie at the sides of the brain,
beneath the lateral or Sylvian fissure. Seen in profile, the human brain ...
Temporal logic In logic, the term temporal logic is used to describe any system of rules and
symbolism for representing, and reasoning about, propositions qualified in ...
occipital
Occipital lobe The occipital lobe is the visual processing center of the mammalian brain,
containing most of the anatomical region of the visual cortex. ...
Occipital bone The occipital bone, a saucer-shaped membrane bone situated at the back and lower
part of the cranium, is trapezoid in shape and curved on itself. ...
Occipital The word occipital refers to several areas of the human body in the occiput, the
rear of the ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Occipital" ...
ethmoid
Ethmoid bone The ethmoid bone (from Greek ethmos, "sieve") is a bone in the skull that separates
the nasal cavity from the brain. As such, it is located at the roof of ...
Ethmoid sinus Each ethmoid sinus is an air-space enclosed within the ethmoid bone. The ethmoidal
air cells consist of numerous thin-walled cavities situated in the ...
Ethmoid bulla On the lateral wall of the middle meatus is a curved fissure, the hiatus semilunaris,
limited below by the edge of the uncinate process of the ethmoid and ...
sphenoid
Sphenoid bone The sphenoid bone (from Greek sphenoeides, "wedgelike") is a bone situated at
the base of the skull in front of the temporals and basilar part of the ...
Sphenoidal sinuses The sphenoidal sinuses (or sphenoid) contained within the body of the sphenoid
vary in size and shape; owing to the lateral displacement of the intervening ...
Ossification of the sphenoid Until the seventh or eighth month of fetal life the body of the sphenoid consists
of two parts: one in front of the tuberculum sellæ, the presphenoid, ...
sinus
Sinus In anatomy, where a sinus is a sac or cavity in any organ or tissue:. Paranasal
sinus, an air cavity in the cranial bones, especially those near the nose ...
Sinusitis Headache is rarely a symptom of sinusitis and a "sinus headache" is often a ...
Acute and chronic sinusitis can cause pressure within the sinus cavities of ...
Paranasal sinus Paranasal sinuses are air-filled spaces, communicating with the nasal cavity,
within the bones of the skull and face. Humans possess a number of paranasal ...
fontanelle
Fontanelle In human anatomy, a fontanelle (or fontanel) is one of two "soft spots" on a
newborn human's skull. There are, however, two more fontanelles of interest, ...
Fontanelle cemetery The Fontanelle cemetery in Naples is a charnel house, an ossuary, located in a
cave in the tuff hillside in the Materdei section of the city. ...
Anterior fontanelle The anterior fontanelle (bregmatic fontanelle, frontal fontanelle) is the largest,
and is placed at the junction of the sagittal suture, coronal suture, ...
coronal
Coronal (Linguistics) Coronals refer to Coronal consonants. (Zoology) The coronal plane
is an anatomical term of location. Relating to a Corona; The coronal ...
Coronal consonant Coronal consonants are articulated with the flexible front part of the tongue.
Only the coronal consonants can be divided into apical (using the tongue tip) ...
Coronal mass ejection A coronal mass ejection (CME) is an ejection of material from the solar corona,
usually observed with a white-light coronagraph. ...
midsagittal
Sagittal plane This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this
article by adding citations to reliable sources. (help, get involved!) ...
User:Esseh/Sandbox Anteroposterior, Sagittal3, Midsagittal, parasagittal4, Same ... (3) "True"
sagittal is actually midsagittal; divides the body into equal left-right halves. ...
Human anatomical terms These are the coronal or frontal plane, the sagittal, midsagittal or median ...
A midsagittal or median sagittal section evenly divides the body along the ...
lambdoidal
Lambdoid suture The lambdoid suture (or Lambdoidal suture) is a dense, fibrous connective tissue
joint that separates the parietal and temporal bones of the skull from the ...
Apert syndrome ... of the sagittal suture), plagiocephaly (fusion of coronal and lambdoidal
sutures unilaterally), oxycephaly (fusion of coronal and lambdoidal sutures). ...
Parietal bone The occipital border, deeply denticulated (finely toothed), articulates with the
occipital bone, forming half of the lambdoid suture. ...
petrosal
Inferior petrosal sinus The inferior petrosal sinus is situated in the inferior petrosal sulcus formed
by the junction of the petrous part of the temporal with the basilar part of ...
Petrosal process On either side of the dorsum sellae of the sphenoid bone is a notch for the
passage of the abducent nerve, and below the notch a sharp process, the petrosal ...
Superior petrosal sinus Vein: Superior petrosal sinus. Dural veins. The sinuses at the base of the skull.
(Superior petrosal sinus visible at center left.) ...
mastoid
Mastoid process The mastoid portion of the temporal bone is continued below into a conical
projection, the mastoid process, the size and form of which vary somewhat; ...
Mastoid portion of the temporal bone - Wikipedia, the free ... It is perforated by numerous foramina; one of these, of large size, situated near
the posterior border, is termed the mastoid foramen; it transmits a vein ...
Mastoid antrum The medial wall and part of the posterior and anterior walls of the right tympanic
cavity, lateral view. ("Mastoid antrum" labeled at upper left, ...
zygomatic
Zygomatic Zygomatic (from Greek zygoma, "yoke") can refer to:. Zygomatic bone · Zygomaticus
major muscle ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zygomatic" ...
Zygomatic bone The zygomatic bone (malar bone) is a paired bone of the human skull. It articulates
with the maxilla, the temporal bone, the sphenoid bone and the frontal ...
Zygomatic arch The zygomatic arch is formed by the zygomatic process of temporal bone (a bone
extending forward from the side of the skull, over the opening of the ear) ...
foramen magnum
Foramen magnum In anatomy, in the occipital bone, the foramen magnum (Latin: 'great hole') is
one of the several oval or circular apertures in the base of the skull (the ...
Brain herniation The brain can shift by such structures as the falx cerebri, the tentorium cerebelli,
and even through the hole called the foramen magnum in the base of the ...
Occipital bone It is pierced by a large oval aperture, the foramen magnum, through which the
cranial cavity communicates with the vertebral canal. ...
atlas
Atlas An atlas is a collection of maps or manifolds, traditionally bound into book
form, but also found in multimedia formats. As well as geographic features and ...
Atlas (mythology) [1] Where a Titan and a Titaness are assigned each of the seven planetary powers,
Atlas is paired with Phoebe and governs the moon. ...
ATLAS experiment When completed, ATLAS will be 46 metres long and 25 metres in diameter, and will
weigh about 7000 tonnes. The project involves roughly 2000 scientists and ...
clinoid process
Anterior clinoid process (Anterior clinoid process visible at top left.) Base of the skull. Upper surface.
(Label for anterior clinoid process visible at center left. ...
Posterior clinoid processes (Posterior clinoid process labeled at upper right.) Base of the skull. Upper surface.
(Caption for posterior clinoid process visible at center left. ...
Middle clinoid process (Middle clinoid process labeled at upper left.) Floor of the skull. (Sphenoid is
in yellow. Middle clinoid process labeled at center left.) ...
cribriform plate
Cribriform plate The cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone (horizontal lamina) is received into
the ethmoidal notch of the frontal bone and roofs in the nasal cavities. ...
Ethmoid bone the horizontal Cribriform plate (lamina cribrosa), part of the cranial base;
the vertical Perpendicular plate (lamina perpendicularis), which is part of the ...
Perpendicular plate of ethmoid bone The surfaces of the plate are smooth, except above, where numerous grooves and
canals are seen; these lead from the medial foramina on the cribriform plate ...
maxillary
Maxilla The maxilla is a fusion of two bones along the palatal fissure that form the
upper jaw. This is similar to the mandible, which is also a fusion of two ...
Maxillary artery The maxillary artery (or internal maxillary artery in older texts) is an artery
that supplies deep structures of the face. ...
Maxillary sinus Found in the body of the maxilla, this sinus has three recesses: an alveolar
recess pointed inferiorly, bounded by the alveolar process of the maxilla; ...
mandible
Mandible This article is about the human bone. For the arthropod mandibles, see
mandible (arthropod). For mandible, see Mandible (disambiguation). ...
Mandible (insect) Insect mandibles are a pair of appendages near the insect?s mouth, and the most
anterior of the three pairs of oral appendages (the labrum is more anterior, ...
Mandible claw The Mandible Claw is a professional wrestling maneuver which, when applied
correctly against an individual, can cause intense, legitimate pain. ...
temporomandibular joint
Temporomandibular joint Temporomandibular joint is the jaw joint and is frequently referred to as TMJ.
There are two TMJs, one on either side, working in unison. ...
Temporomandibular joint disorder Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD, TMJ or TMD), or TMJ syndrome, is an
umbrella term covering acute or chronic inflammation of the temporomandibular ...
Articular disk of the temporomandibular joint - Wikipedia, the ... Articular disk of the temporomandibular joint. Sagittal section of the articulation
of the mandible. (Articular disk visible at center.) ...
condyloid process
Condyloid process The condyloid process is thicker than the coronoid, and consists of two portions:
the condyle, and the constricted portion which supports it, the neck. ...
Alveolar process of maxilla On the maxilla, the alveolar process is a ridge on the inferior surface, ...
Mandibular canal, Angle, Coronoid process, Condyloid process, Mandibular notch) ...
Condyloid fossa Bone: Condyloid fossa. Occipital bone. Outer surface. ... Condyloid fossa -
Condylar canal - Jugular process - Jugular tubercle) - Basilar part (Pharyngeal ...
ramus
Ramus Ramus can refer to:. Petrus Ramus; A portion of a bone (from Latin ramus, "branch"),
as in the Ramus mandibulæ or Superior pubic ramus ...
Petrus Ramus Petrus Ramus, or Pierre de la Ramée (1515 ? August 26, 1572), French humanist,
logician, and educational reformer, was born at the village of Cuts in ...
Ramus Pomifer Ramus Pomifer (Latin for apple branch) was a constellation located between Hercules
and Lyra. It was depicted in the form of three serpents wrapped around a ...
coronoid process
Coronoid process The Coronoid process (from Greek korone, "like a crow's beak") can refer to:.
The coronoid process of the mandible, part of the ramus mandibulae of the ...
Coronoid process of the ulna Frequently, the Flexor pollicis longus muscle arises from the lower part of the
coronoid process by a rounded bundle of muscular fibers. ...
Coronoid process of the mandible The coronoid process is a thin, triangular eminence, which is flattened from side
to side and varies in shape and size. Its anterior border is convex and is ...
--- 9/5/07 Lecture 4 Skeletal System 3
maxillary bone
Maxilla The bony palate and alveolar arch. Sphenoid bone visible center right. Articulation
of left palatine bone with maxilla. Side view of the teeth and jaws. ...
Zygomatic bone Most of it belongs to the zygomatic bone, but there are other bones contributing
to it too, namely the frontal bone, maxilla and temporal bone. ...
Snake skeleton B. No coronoid bone; nasals isolated. 1. Maxillary elongate, not movable ...
Maxillary bone solid .......... Vipera. Maxillary bone hollowed out . ...
nasal
Nasal consonant A nasal consonant is produced when the velum?that fleshy part of the palate near
the back?is lowered, allowing air to escape freely through the nose. ...
Nasal Jump to: navigation, search. Look up nasal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Nasal may refer to: ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nasal" ...
Nasal vowel A nasal vowel is a vowel that is produced with a lowering of the velum so that
air escapes both through nose as well as the mouth. ...
lacrimal
Lacrimal bone The lacrimal bone, the smallest and most fragile bone of the face, is situated
at the front part of the medial wall of the orbit. ...
Lacrimal gland The orbital portion is the largest of the portions, and its convex superior
surface is lodged in the lacrimal fossa of the orbit. ...
Lacrimal Jump to: navigation, search. In anatomy Lacrimal can refer to:. Lacrimal artery ·
Lacrimal bone ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lacrimal" ...
zygomatic
Zygomatic Zygomatic (from Greek zygoma, "yoke") can refer to:. Zygomatic bone · Zygomaticus
major muscle ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zygomatic" ...
Zygomatic bone The zygomatic bone (malar bone) is a paired bone of the human skull. It articulates
with the maxilla, the temporal bone, the sphenoid bone and the frontal ...
Zygomatic arch The zygomatic arch is formed by the zygomatic process of temporal bone (a bone
extending forward from the side of the skull, over the opening of the ear) ...
palatine
Palatine Hill The Palatine Hill (Latin: Palatium) is the centermost of the seven hills of Rome
and is one of the most ancient parts of the city of Rome in Italy. ...
Paladin (disambiguation) Other variants derived from the same root include palatine and palatinus ...
All these meanings are ultimnately derived from the Palatine Hill in Rome, ...
Palatine, Illinois Palatine is a village in Cook County, Illinois, United States. It is a northwestern
residential suburb of Chicago. As of the 2000 census, the village had a ...
conchae
Inferior nasal conchae The inferior nasal concha (Inferior Turbinated Bone) is one of the turbinates in
the nose. It extends horizontally along the lateral wall of the nasal ...
Sphenoidal conchae The sphenoidal conchae (sphenoidal turbinated processes) are two thin, curved
plates, situated at the anterior and lower part of the body of the sphenoid. ...
Turbinate In anatomy, a turbinate (or nasal concha) is a long, narrow and curled bone
shelf (shaped like an elongated sea-shell) which protrudes into the breathing ...
vomer
Vomer The vomer (from Latin vomer, -?ris, "ploughshare") is one of the unpaired facial
bones of the skull. It is located in the midsagittal line, and touches the ...
Vomer flap surgery Vomer flap surgery was used prior to 1975 as a surgical treatment for children
with cleft palate. In this procedure, the vomer bone was used to reconstruct ...
Ossification of vomer Two ossific centers, one on either side of the middle line, appear about the
eighth week of fetal life in this part of the membrane, and hence the vomer ...
mandible
Mandible This article is about the human bone. For the arthropod mandibles, see
mandible (arthropod). For mandible, see Mandible (disambiguation). ...
Mandible (insect) Insect mandibles are a pair of appendages near the insect?s mouth, and the most
anterior of the three pairs of oral appendages (the labrum is more anterior, ...
Mandible claw The Mandible Claw is a professional wrestling maneuver which, when applied
correctly against an individual, can cause intense, legitimate pain. ...
condyloid process
Condyloid process The condyloid process is thicker than the coronoid, and consists of two portions:
the condyle, and the constricted portion which supports it, the neck. ...
Alveolar process of maxilla On the maxilla, the alveolar process is a ridge on the inferior surface, ...
Mandibular canal, Angle, Coronoid process, Condyloid process, Mandibular notch) ...
Condyloid fossa Bone: Condyloid fossa. Occipital bone. Outer surface. ... Condyloid fossa -
Condylar canal - Jugular process - Jugular tubercle) - Basilar part (Pharyngeal ...
coronoid process
Coronoid process The Coronoid process (from Greek korone, "like a crow's beak") can refer to:.
The coronoid process of the mandible, part of the ramus mandibulae of the ...
Coronoid process of the ulna Frequently, the Flexor pollicis longus muscle arises from the lower part of the
coronoid process by a rounded bundle of muscular fibers. ...
Coronoid process of the mandible The coronoid process is a thin, triangular eminence, which is flattened from side
to side and varies in shape and size. Its anterior border is convex and is ...
ramus
Ramus Ramus can refer to:. Petrus Ramus; A portion of a bone (from Latin ramus, "branch"),
as in the Ramus mandibulæ or Superior pubic ramus ...
Petrus Ramus Petrus Ramus, or Pierre de la Ramée (1515 ? August 26, 1572), French humanist,
logician, and educational reformer, was born at the village of Cuts in ...
Ramus Pomifer Ramus Pomifer (Latin for apple branch) was a constellation located between Hercules
and Lyra. It was depicted in the form of three serpents wrapped around a ...
hyoid
Hyoid bone The hyoid bone (Lingual Bone) is a bone in the human neck, and is the only bone
in the skeleton not articulated to any other bone. ...
Hyoid bone The hyoid bone (Lingual Bone) is a bone in the human neck, and is the only bone
in the skeleton not articulated to any other bone. ...
Hyoid arch Hyoid arch. Head end of human embryo, about the end of the fourth week. Floor of
pharynx of embryo. (Second arch visible near center.) ...
larynx
Larynx The larynx (plural larynges), colloquially known as the voicebox, is an organ in
the neck of mammals involved in protection of the trachea and sound ...
Laryngeal cancer Laryngeal cancer may also be called cancer of the larynx or laryngeal carcinoma.
Most laryngeal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, reflecting their ...
Mechanical larynx A mechanical larynx is a medical device used to produce clearer speech by those
who have lost their original voicebox, usually due to cancer of the larynx. ...
facet
Facet Facets are flat faces on geometric shapes. The organization of naturally occurring
facets was key to early developments in crystallography, ...
Facet (mathematics) A facet of a geometric polyhedron is traditionally any polygon whose corners are
vertices of the polyhedron. By extension to higher dimensions, ...
Zygapophysial joint A zygapophysial joint (zygapophyseal, or facet joint) is a synovial joint between
the ... There are two facet joints in each vertebral motion segment. ...
annulus fibrosis
Intervertebral disc Discs consist of an outer annulus fibrosus, which surrounds the inner nucleus
... The disc can be likened to a doughnut: whereby the annulus fibrosis is ...
Annulus fibrosus disci intervertebralis - Wikipedia, the free ... Each intervertebral fibrocartilage is composed, at its circumference, of laminæ
of fibrous tissue and fibrocartilage, forming the annulus fibrosus. ...
Intervertebral disc Discs consist of an outer annulus fibrosus, which surrounds the inner nucleus
... The disc can be likened to a doughnut: whereby the annulus fibrosis is ...
nucleus pulposus
Nucleus pulposus Nucleus pulposus is the jelly-like substance in the middle of the spinal disc.
It is the remnant of the notochord. It functions to distribute hydraulic ...
Intervertebral disc Discs consist of an outer annulus fibrosus, which surrounds the inner nucleus
pulposus. The annulus fibrosus consists of several layers of fibrocartilage. ...
Intervertebral disc The strong annular fibers contain the nucleus pulposus and distribute pressure
... The nucleus pulposus contains loose fibers suspended in a mucoprotein gel ...
slipped disc
Ten Hands (band) 1992, Be My Guru, Slipped Disc, Image:TenHands_Guru.jpeg. 1993, Jazz For Jerks,
Clubland, Image:TenHands_Jazz4Jerks.jpeg ...
User talk:Terence/Archive 12 23 Slipped disc; 24 On Digital Life? 25 Signpost updated for January 29th, 2007.
..... [edit] Slipped disc. You're welcome to read my edit history, ...
User talk:Rebroad/Archive 1 Medical personnel have created the new article and were agreed the Slipped disc
article was very problematic. -- Fyslee 12:48, 28 January 2007 (UTC) ...
costal cartilage
Costal cartilages The costal cartilages are bars of hyaline cartilage which serve to ... Each costal
cartilage presents two surfaces, two borders, and two extremities. ...
Manubrium The lateral borders are each marked above by a depression for the first costal
cartilage, and below by a small facet, which, with a similar facet on the ...
Costochondral joint The costochondral joints are the articulations between the false ribs and costal
cartilage. They are hyaline cartilagenous joints. Each rib has a depression ...
jugular notch
Suprasternal notch The suprasternal notch (incisura jugularis sternalis), also known as the jugular
notch, is part of human anatomy. It is the large, visible dip where the ...
Lateral parts of occipital bone Extending lateralward from the posterior half of the condyle is a quadrilateral
plate of bone, the jugular process, excavated in front by the jugular notch, ...
Jugular process (Jugular process not labeled, but occipital bone is identified in blue at the
... the jugular process, excavated in front by the jugular notch, which, ...
manubrium
Manubrium The manubrium (from Latin manubr?um, "a handle") or manubrium sterni is the broad,
upper part of the sternum. With a quadrangular shape, wider superiorly ...
Sternum It is slightly convex in front and concave behind; broad above, becoming narrowed
at the point where the manubrium joins the body, after which it again ...
Ossification of sternum These two bars fuse with each other along the middle line to form the cartilaginous
sternum which is ossified from six centers: one for the manubrium, ...
xiphoid
Xiphoid process The xiphoid process is a small cartilaginous extension to the lower part of the
sternum which is usually ossified in the adult human. By age 15 to 29, ...
Xiphoid process The xiphoid process is a small cartilaginous extension to the lower part of the
sternum which is usually ossified in the adult human. By age 15 to 29, ...
User:Xiphoid From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search. Retrieved
from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Xiphoid" ...
sternal angle
Sternal angle The sternal angle is the angle formed by the junction of the manubrium and the
body of the sternum in the form of a secondary cartilaginous joint ...
Sternum The sternum is an elongated, flattened bone, forming the middle portion of the
... The most common site of sternal fractures is at the sternal angle. ...
Body of sternum The superior border is oval and articulates with the manubrium, the junction of
the two forming the sternal angle (angulus Ludovici). ...
sternoclavicular joint
Shoulder In regards to the shoulder, however, it also aids in respiration by elevating
the sternoclavicular joint when the head is fixed. ...
Sternoclavicular articulation The sternoclavicular articulation is a double arthrodial joint. The parts entering
into its formation are the sternal end of the clavicle, the upper and ...
Common carotid artery It originates along the aortic arch, and travels upward through the superior
mediastinum to the level of the left sternoclavicular joint, ...
acromion process
Acromion The acromion forms the summit of the shoulder, and is a large, somewhat triangular
or oblong process, flattened from behind forward, projecting at first ...
Coracoid process The coracoid process is a thick curved process attached by a broad base to the
upper part of the neck of the scapula; it runs at first upward and medialward ...
Shoulder The acromioclavicular (AC) joint is located between the acromion process of the
... It inserts on the lateral clavicle, the acromion process, and into the ...
greater and lesser tubercle
Upper extremity of humerus ('tuberculum majus; greater tuberosity') The greater tubercle is situated lateral
to the head and lesser tubercle, and just lateral to the anatomical neck. ...
Lesser tubercle The lesser tubercle of the humerus, although smaller, is more prominent than the
greater tubercle: it is situated in front, and is directed medialward and ...
Greater tubercle The greater tubercle of the humerus is situated lateral to the head and lesser
tubercle. Its upper surface is rounded and marked by three flat impressions. ...
intertubercular groove
Intertubercular groove The tubercles of the humerus are separated from each other by a deep groove, the
intertubercular groove (bicipital groove, sulcus intertubercular), ...
Upper extremity of humerus The tubercles are separated from each other by a deep groove, the intertubercular
groove (bicipital groove), which lodges the long tendon of the biceps ...
Humerus Pectoralis major, teres major and latissimus dorsi, which all insert at the
intertubercular groove of the humerus, adduct and medially rotate the humerus. ...
anatomical and surgical neck
Surgical neck of the humerus The surgical neck of the humerus is a constriction below the tubercles of ...
It is much more frequently fractured than the anatomical neck of the humerus. ...
Upper extremity of humerus 1 The head; 2 The anatomical neck; 3 The greater tubercle; 4 The lesser tubercle;
5 The intertubercular (bicipital) groove; 6 The surgical neck ...
Anatomical neck of humerus The anatomical neck of the humerus is obliquely directed, ... Humerus ·
upper extremity: necks (anatomical, surgical) - tubercles (greater, ...
cervical
Cervical Look up cervical in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. In anatomy, 'cervical' is
an adjective that has two meanings:. of or pertaining to any neck. ...
Cervical cancer Cervical cancer is a malignant cancer of the cervix. It may present with vaginal
bleeding but symptoms may be absent until the cancer is in its advanced ...
Cervical vertebrae In many vertebrate species, cervical vertebrae are variable in number; however,
almost all mammals have seven (including those with very short necks, ...
thoracic
Thoracic cavity The thoracic cavity (or chest cavity) is the chamber of the human body (and other
animal bodies) that is protected by the thoracic wall (thoracic cage and ...
Thoracic vertebrae The thoracic vertebrae compose the middle segment of the vertebral column, between
the cervical vertebrae and the lumbar vertebrae. They are intermediate in ...
Thoracic outlet syndrome Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) consists of a group of distinct disorders that
affect the nerves in the brachial plexus (nerves that pass into the arms from ...
lumbar
Lumbar In anatomy, lumbar is an adjective that means of or pertaining to the abdominal
segment of the torso, between the diaphragm and the sacrum (pelvis). ...
Lumbar vertebrae The lumbar vertebrae are the largest segments of the movable part of the vertebral
column, and can be distinguished by the absence of a foramen (hole) in ...
Lumbar puncture A patient undergoes a lumbar puncture at the hands of a neurologist. The reddish-brown
swirls on the patient's back are iodine (a disinfectant). ...
sacral
Sacral The adjective sacral may have one of the following meanings. A synonym for "sacred".
... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacral" ...
Sacral plexus In human anatomy, the sacral plexus is a nerve plexus emerging from the sacral
vertebrae (S1-S4), and which provides nerves for the pelvis and lower limbs. ...
Sacrum The sacrum is a large, triangular bone at the base of the spine and at the upper
and back part of the pelvic cavity, where it is inserted like a wedge ...
coccygeal
Coccyx Of these, the superior pair are large, and are called the coccygeal cornua; they
project upward, and articulate with the cornua of the sacrum, and on either ...
Coccygeal nerve The coccygeal nerve is the 31st spinal nerve. It arises from the sacral plexus,
and its ventral ramus helps form the coccygeal plexus. ...
Coccygeal plexus This plexus is formed by the fifth sacral nerve (with a contribution from S4)
and the coccygeal nerve. It gives rise to the anococcygeal nerve. ...
scoliosis
Scoliosis Scoliosis is a condition that involves complex lateral and rotational curvature
and deformity of the spine. It is typically classified as congenital (caused ...
Minimally Invasive Thorasic Spinal Fusion - Wikipedia, the free ... Scoliosis is a three dimensional curvature of the spine. ... Scoliosis: Ascending
the Curve. New York: M. Evans and Company, Inc., 1999. Scoliosis. ...
Spondylolisthesis The routine use of pedicle screws for one or two level pediatric fusions (not
long fusions for correcting scoliosis) is without proven benefit in clinical ...
kyphosis
Kyphosis Kyphosis (Greek - kyphos, a hump), in general terms, is a curvature of the upper
spine. It can be either the result of bad posture or a structural anomaly ...
Kyphosis (disambiguation) A deformity, where the back is bowed (see kyphosis article for more details);
A term describing the normally convex (arched, kyphotic) segments of the spine ...
Scheuermann's disease Patients suffering with Scheuermann?s kyphosis cannot consciously correct their
... Whereas in postural kyphosis, the vertebrae and disks appear normal, ...
lordosis
Lordosis Lordosis (commonly referred to as swayback, saddle back, or hyper-lordosis) is
a medical term used to describe an inward curvature of a portion of the ...
Lordosis behavior Lordosis behavior, or Mammalian lordosis, is a sexual response in mammals, such
as mice and cats, that consists of a ventral arching of the spine. ...
User talk:Puellanivis 4 estradiol/lordosis behavior in male mammals; 5 Meaning maintenance; 6 Hej! 7 Hej
.... male lordosis behavior is normal in bighorn sheep. ...
lamina
Lamina Laminae, a part of the horse hoof; Lamina Forster, a genus of the (intertidal
spider) ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamina" ...
Lamina of the vertebral arch Bone: Lamina of the vertebral arch. A typical thoracic vertebra, viewed from above.
(Lamina labeled at bottom left.) A cervical vertebra. ...
Basal lamina The basal lamina is a layer on which epithelium sits and which is secreted by
the epithelial cells. It is often confused with the basement membrane, ...
transverse
Transverse Look up transverse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Transverse may refer to:
... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transverse" ...
Transverse wave A light wave is an example of a transverse wave. The light wave is however
composite, all parts of which have transversal wave properties. ...
Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate system - Wikipedia, the ... The Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinate system is a grid-based method
of specifying locations on the surface of the Earth. ...
process
Process Process (lat. processus - movement) is a naturally occurring or designed sequence
of changes of properties or attributes of an object or system [1] [2] [3] ...
Process (computing) In computing, a process is an instance of a computer program that is being
sequentially executed. [1] While a program itself is just a passive collection of ...
Business process Management processes - the processes that govern the operation of a system.
Typical management processes include "Corporate Governance" and "Strategic ...
articular process
Articular processes The articular processes (zygapophyses) of a vertebra, two superior and two ...
articular+process at eMedicine Dictionary; Photo of model at Waynesburg ...
Atlas (anatomy) The diminutive size of this process prevents any interference with the ...
which arches backward from the posterior end of the superior articular process. ...
User:Figma/Sandbox process, A relatively large projection or prominent bump. articulation, The region
where adjacent bones contact each other?a joint. articular process, A ...
odontoid or dens
Dens (anatomy) The dens or odontoid process or odontoid peg of the axis exhibits a slight
constriction or neck, where it joins the body. On its anterior surface is an oval ...
Axis (anatomy) The most distinctive characteristic of this bone is the strong odontoid
process ("dens") which rises perpendicularly from the upper surface of the body. ...
Cervical vertebrae The most distinctive characteristic of this bone is the strong odontoid process (dens)
which rises perpendicularly from the upper surface of the body. ...
pivot
Pivot table A pivot table is a data summarization tool found in data visualization programs
such as spreadsheets. Among other functions, it can automatically sort, ...
Pivot A pivot joint is a kind of joint between bones in the body. ... Retrieved
from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pivot". Category: Disambiguation ...
Bernard Pivot Bernard Pivot (born 5 May 1935) is a journalist, interviewer and host of French
cultural television programmes. He is a member of the Académie Goncourt. ...
--- 9/7/07 Lecture 5 Skeletal System 4
acromion
Acromion The acromion forms the summit of the shoulder, and is a large, somewhat triangular
or oblong process, flattened from behind forward, projecting at first ...
Acromion The acromion forms the summit of the shoulder, and is a large, somewhat triangular
or oblong process, flattened from behind forward, projecting at first ...
Ossification of scapula The base of the acromion is formed by an extension from the spine; ... Failure of
bony union between the acromion and spine sometimes occurs, the junction ...
acromial process
Acromion The acromion forms the summit of the shoulder, and is a large, somewhat triangular
or oblong process, flattened from behind forward, projecting at first ...
Acromion The acromion forms the summit of the shoulder, and is a large, somewhat triangular
or oblong process, flattened from behind forward, projecting at first ...
Coracoacromial ligament This ligament, together with the coracoid process and the acromion, forms a vault
for the protection of the head of the humerus. It is in relation, above, ...
glenoid fossa
Glenoid fossa From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search. The Glenoid
fossa can refer to:. Glenoid cavity (more common); Mandibular fossa ...
Glenoid cavity On the lateral angle of the scapula is a shallow pyriform, articular surface,
the glenoid cavity (or glenoid fossa of scapula), which is directed ...
Mandibular fossa In the temporal bone, the mandibular fossa (glenoid fossa) is bounded, in front,
by the articular tubercle; behind, by the tympanic part of the bone, ...
greater tubercle
Greater tubercle The greater tubercle of the humerus is situated lateral to the head and lesser
tubercle. ... The lateral surface of the greater tubercle is convex, rough, ...
Upper extremity of humerus ('tuberculum majus; greater tuberosity') The greater tubercle is situated lateral
to the head and lesser tubercle, and just lateral to the anatomical neck. ...
Humerus Supraspinatus muscle, greater tubercle, superior facet. Teres minor muscle,
greater tubercle, inferior facet. Subscapularis muscle · lesser tubercle ...
lesser tubercle
Lesser tubercle The lesser tubercle of the humerus, although smaller, is more prominent than the
greater tubercle: it is situated in front, and is directed medialward and ...
Upper extremity of humerus ('tuberculum majus; greater tuberosity') The greater tubercle is situated lateral
to the head and lesser tubercle, and just lateral to the anatomical neck. ...
Body of humerus The medial border extends from the lesser tubercle to the medial epicondyle.
Its upper third consists of a prominent ridge, the crest of the lesser tubercle ...
intertubercular groove
Intertubercular groove The tubercles of the humerus are separated from each other by a deep groove, the
intertubercular groove (bicipital groove, sulcus intertubercular), ...
Upper extremity of humerus The tubercles are separated from each other by a deep groove, the intertubercular
groove (bicipital groove), which lodges the long tendon of the biceps ...
Humerus Pectoralis major, teres major and latissimus dorsi, which all insert at the
intertubercular groove of the humerus, adduct and medially rotate the humerus. ...
medial & lateral epicondyle
Lateral epicondyle of the femur The lateral epicondyle of the femur, smaller and less prominent than the medial
epicondyle, gives attachment to the fibular collateral ligament of the ...
Medial epicondyle of the femur The medial epicondyle of the femur is a large convex eminence to which the ...
(lateral condyle, medial condyle, lateral epicondyle, medial epicondyle, ...
Lateral epicondyle of the humerus The lateral epicondyle of the humerus is a small, tuberculated eminence, ...
infraspinatous) - borders (superior, lateral/axillary, medial/vertebral) ...
radial tuberosity
Radial tuberosity (Radial tuberosity visible at center right.) Bones of left forearm. Anterior aspect.
(Radius is bone on right. Radial tuberosity is visible at upper left ...
Upper extremity of radius Beneath the neck, on the medial side, is an eminence, the radial tuberosity; its
surface is divided into a posterior, rough portion, for the insertion of ...
Radial fossa Above the front part of the capitulum is a slight depression, the radial fossa,
... conoid tubercle - trapezoid line - costal tuberosity - subclavian groove ...
olecranon process
Ulna Proximally, the ulna has a bony process, the olecranon process, a hook-like
structure that fits into the olecranon fossa of the humerus. ...
Upper extremity of ulna ('olecranon process') The olecranon is a large, thick, curved eminence, situated
at the upper and back part of the ulna. It is bent forward at the summit so ...
Anconeus muscle Insertion:, lateral surface of the olecranon process and the superior part of
... can be easily palpated just lateral to the olecranon process of the ulna. ...
trochlear notch
Semilunar notch The semilunar notch of the ulna (trochlear notch of ulna, greater sigmoid cavity)
is a large depression, formed by the olecranon and the coronoid process, ...
Elbow dysplasia This is known as elbow incongruity, and it may be caused by abnormal development
of the trochlear notch of the ulna. [1] ...
Trochlear fovea (Trochlear fovea not directly labeled, but visible at bottom right. ...
Foramen cecum) - Pars orbitalis (Ethmoidal notch - Lacrimal fossa - Trochlear fovea ...
styloid process
Styloid process In anatomy, a styloid process (from Greek stylos, "pillar"), usually serving as
points of attachment for muscles, refers to the slender, pointed process ...
Ulna Proximally, the ulna has a bony process, the olecranon process, a hook-like
structure that fits ... Distally (near the hand), there is a styloid process. ...
Temporal styloid process The styloid process is a slender pointed piece of bone just below the ear.
It projects down and forward from the inferior surface of the temporal bone, ...
carpal bones
Carpus [edit] Common characteristics of the carpal bones. Each bone (excepting the
pisiform) presents six (6) surfaces. Of these the palmar or anterior and the ...
Intercarpal articulations In this movement the carpal bones rotate on a transverse axis drawn between the
tips of the styloid processes of the radius and ulna. ...
Carpus This article is about Carpal bones. In Greek mythology, Carpus (Greek: ...
While this article focuses primarily on human anatomy, the carpal bones have ...
metacarpals
Metacarpus Besides their phalangeal articulations, the metacarpal bones articulate as follows:
... Multiple fractures of the metacarpals (aka broken hand). Hand bones ...
Equine forelimb anatomy The large third metacarpal (informally the cannon or shin bone) provides the
major support of ... These smaller metacarpals are often called splint bones. ...
Dorsal interossei of the hand They are specified as 'dorsal' to contrast them with the palmar interossei, which
are located on the anterior side of the metacarpals. ...
greater trochanter
Greater trochanter The greater trochanter (great trochanter) of the femur is a large, irregular,
quadrilateral eminence, situated at the junction of the neck with the upper ...
Trochanteric fossa In mammals including humans, the medial surface of the greater trochanter has at
its base a deep depression bounded posteriorly by the intertrochanteric ...
Body of femur The other two borders of the femur are only slightly marked: the lateral border
extends from the antero-inferior angle of the greater trochanter to the ...
lesser trochanter
Lesser trochanter Bone: Lesser trochanter. Left hip-joint, opened by removing the floor of the
acetabulum from within the pelvis. Upper extremity of right femur viewed from ...
Trochanteric fossa It is bounded medially by the internal trochanter (also known as the lesser
trochanter), laterally by the posterior branch of the ventral ridge, ...
Trochanter Image including greater and lesser trochanter. Image including greater and lesser
trochanter. Trochanter is a part of the thigh bone. It can refer to: ...
sesamoid bone
Sesamoid bone The presence of the sesamoid bone holds the tendon slightly farther away from
the center of the joint and thus increases its moment arm. Sesamoid bones also ...
Sesamoiditis Usually periostitis (new bone growth) occurs along with sesamoiditis, ...
Sometimes the sesamoid bone will even fracture and can be difficult to pick up on ...
Sesamoid bone The presence of the sesamoid bone holds the tendon slightly farther away from
the center of the joint and thus increases its moment arm. Sesamoid bones also ...
tibial tuberosity
Tibial tuperosity advancement procedure - Wikipedia, the free ... Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA) is an orthopedic procedure to repair deficient
cranial cruciate ligaments in dogs. It has also been used in cats. ...
Tuberosity of the tibia Narrow below where the anterior surfaces of the condyles of the tibia end in a
large oblong elevation, the tuberosity of the tibia, which gives attachment ...
Tibia The tibia or shin bone, in human anatomy, is found medial (towards the middle)
... condyle - intercondyloid eminence - tuberosity of the tibia - posterior ...
quadriceps femoris tendon
Vastus lateralis muscle A few additional fibers arise from the tendon of the Glutæus maximus, ...
blending with the Quadriceps femoris tendon, and giving an expansion to the ...
Quadriceps femoris muscle The quadriceps femoris (quadriceps, quadriceps extensor, ... All four parts of
the quadriceps muscle attach to the patella via the quadriceps tendon. ...
Quadriceps tendon In human anatomy, the quadriceps tendon connects the quadriceps femoris muscles
to the superior aspects of the patella on the anterior of the thigh. ...
periosteum
Periosteum The periosteum is a thin layer of dense, irregular connective tissue membrane
that covers the outer surface of a bone in all places except at joints. ...
Endochondral ossification Formation of periosteum:Once vascularized, the perichondrium becomes the periosteum.
The periosteum contains a layer of undifferentiated cells which later ...
Intramembranous ossification The periosteum is formed and bone growth continues at the surface of trabeculae.
Much like spicules, the increasing growth of trabeculae result in ...
medial & lateral malleolus
Lateral malleolus Lateral aspect of right leg. (Lateral malleolus labeled at lower left.) ...
it descends to a lower level than the medial malleolus. The lateral surface is ...
Body of fibula The antero-medial border, or interosseous crest, is situated close to the medial
... surface immediately above the articular facet of the lateral malleolus. ...
Medial malleolus its lateral or articular surface is smooth and slightly concave, ... The summit
of the medial malleolus is marked by a rough depression behind, ...
tibia
Tibia The tibia or shin bone, in human anatomy, is found medial (towards the middle)
and anterior (towards the front) to the other such bone, the fibula. ...
Tibia (computer game) Encyclopedia article describing the game and its history.
Body of tibia The body of the tibia has three borders and three surfaces. ... for the attachment
of the interosseous ligament connecting the tibia and fibula. ...
fibula
Fibula The fibula or calf bone is a bone located on the lateral side of the tibia, with
which it is connected above and below. It is the smaller of the two bones, ...
Praeneste fibula The Praeneste fibula or Præneste fibula (the "brooch of Palestrina") is a golden
brooch that was once thought to be the earliest surviving specimen of the ...
Body of fibula The body of fibula presents four borders - the antero-lateral, the antero-medial,
the postero-lateral, and the postero-medial; and four surfaces - anterior, ...
talus
Talus Talus (which is Latin for ankle-bone) may refer to: ... Talus, in architecture,
the slope of an embankment wall, which is thicker at the bottom than at the ...
Talus bone Due to the way that the talus bone is shaped, it can land in one of four positions.
This fact led to the bone assuming a role as a form of die in games of ...
Scree Scree, also called talus and detritic cone, is a term given to broken rock that
appears at ... The term scree is generally used interchangeably with talus, ...
calcaneus
Calcaneus The calcaneus is the largest bone of the human foot. The skeleton of the human
foot is made up of three groups of bones: the tarsus, the metatarsus and the ...
Rhacophorus calcaneus Rhacophorus calcaneus is a species of frog in the Rhacophoridae family. It is
found in Laos, Vietnam, and possibly Cambodia. Its natural habitats are ...
Achilles tendon Posterior view of the foot and leg, showing the Achilles tendon (tendo calcaneus).
The gastrocnemius muscle is cut to expose the soleus. ...
metatarsals
Metatarsus The base of each metatarsal bone articulates with one or more of the tarsal bones,
... The second and third metatarsals are fixed while walking, ...
Wikipedia:Peer review/Daspletosaurus/archive1 - Wikipedia, the ... I have an image from Columbia University that shows that D. torosus walked around
on its metatarsals and so... never mind. ...
Craig Johnston ... ankles, and of course, metatarsals. He also thinks that the problem can be
solved by designing a smaller stud that doesn't stick to the soil. ...
Achilles' tendon
Achilles tendon Posterior view of the foot and leg, showing the Achilles tendon (tendo calcaneus).
The gastrocnemius muscle is cut to expose the soleus. ...
Achilles tendon rupture Achilles tendon rupture commonly occurs as an acceleration injury e.g. pushing
off or jumping up. Diagnosis is made by clinical history; typically people ...
Achilles tendinitis Achilles tendinitis is tendinitis of the Achilles tendon, generally precipitated
... The Achilles tendon does not have good blood supply or cell activity, ...
osteoporosis
Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a disease of bone leading to an increased risk of fracture.
In osteoporosis the bone mineral density (BMD) is reduced, ...
Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a disease of bone in which the bone mineral density (BMD) is
reduced, bone microarchitecture is disrupted, and the amount and variety of ...
Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a disease of bone leading to an increased risk of fracture.
In osteoporosis the bone mineral density (BMD) is reduced, ...
ilium
Ilium (novel) Ilium is a science fiction novel by Dan Simmons, the first part of the Ilium/Olympus
cycle, concerning the re-creation of the events in the Iliad on Mars. ...
Ilion (disambiguation) Ilion or Ilium may refer to:. Ilion or Ilium, alternative names for the legendary
city of Troy · Ilio, Greece, a suburb of Athens, Greece, also known as Nea ...
Ilium (bone) The ilium of the pelvis is divisible into two parts, the body and the ala; the
separation is indicated on the internal surface by a curved line, ...
ischium
Ischium (bone) The ischium forms the lower and back part of the hip bone. It is situated below
the ilium. The word comes from the Greek ischion, meaning "hip. ...
Body of ischium From its posterior border there extends backward a thin and pointed triangular
eminence, the ischial spine, more or less elongated in different subjects. ...
Ischial spine From the posterior border of the body of the Ischium there extends backward a
thin and pointed triangular eminence, the ischial spine, ...
ischial tuberosity
Tuberosity of the ischium Posteriorly, the superior ramus of the ischium forms a large swelling, the
tuberosity of the ischium (or ischial tuberosity). ...
Hamstring biceps femoris - long head, ischial tuberosity, lateral side of the head of the
fibula · tibial · biceps femoris - short head, linea aspera near the head of ...
Hamstring semitendinosus, ischial tuberosity, medial surface of tibia, tibial ...
biceps femoris - long head, ischial tuberosity, lateral side of the head of the ...
obturator foramen
Obturator foramen The obturator foramen is the hole created by the ischium and pubic bones of the
pelvis through which nerves and muscles pass. ...
Obturator artery The obturator artery passes antero-inferiorly (forwards and downwards) on the
lateral wall of the pelvis, to the upper part of the obturator foramen, and, ...
Obturator membrane The membrane is attached to the sharp margin of the obturator foramen except at
its lower lateral angle, where it is fixed to the pelvic surface of the ...
pubis or pubic bone
Pubis (bone) In the female, the pubic bone is anterior to the urethral sponge. The left and
right hip bones join at the pubic symphysis. ...
Osteitis pubis The cause of osteitis pubis is excessive physical strain on the pubic bone,
usually caused by the increasing rigorous demands of competitive sport, ...
Mons pubis This pushes the forward portion of the labia majora out and away from the pubic
bone, and parallel to the ground (when standing). ...
pubic symphysis
Pubic symphysis The pubic symphysis is the midline cartilaginous joint uniting the superior rami
of the left and right pubic bones (pubis). ...
Human abdomen The pelvic brim stretches from the lumbosacral angle (the intervertebral disk
between L5 and S1) to the pubic symphysis and is the edge of the pelvic inlet. ...
Pelvic girdle pain Pubic Symphysis Separation. Fetal and Maternal Medicine Review (2002), 13: 141-155
Kelly Owens, Anne Pearson, Gerald Mason; ^ Pain In Childbearing, ...
--- 9/10/07 Lecture 6 Skeletal System 5
periosteum
Periosteum The periosteum is a thin layer of dense, irregular connective tissue membrane
that covers the outer surface of a bone in all places except at joints. ...
Endochondral ossification Formation of periosteum:Once vascularized, the perichondrium becomes the periosteum.
The periosteum contains a layer of undifferentiated cells which later ...
Intramembranous ossification The periosteum is formed and bone growth continues at the surface of trabeculae.
Much like spicules, the increasing growth of trabeculae result in ...
talus
Talus Talus (which is Latin for ankle-bone) may refer to: ... Talus, in architecture,
the slope of an embankment wall, which is thicker at the bottom than at the ...
Talus bone Due to the way that the talus bone is shaped, it can land in one of four positions.
This fact led to the bone assuming a role as a form of die in games of ...
Scree Scree, also called talus and detritic cone, is a term given to broken rock that
appears at ... The term scree is generally used interchangeably with talus, ...
malleolus
Medial malleolus its posterior border presents a broad groove, the malleolar sulcus, directed
obliquely downward and medialward, and occasionally double; this sulcus lodges ...
Lateral malleolus The lower extremity (distal extremity; external malleolus) of the fibula is of
a pyramidal form, and somewhat flattened from side to side; it descends to a ...
Malleolus Malleolus is the name for the bony prominence on each side of the ankle. The one
to the outside of the leg is the lateral malleolus, and the one to the ...
calcaneus
Calcaneus The calcaneus is the largest bone of the human foot. The skeleton of the human
foot is made up of three groups of bones: the tarsus, the metatarsus and the ...
Rhacophorus calcaneus Rhacophorus calcaneus is a species of frog in the Rhacophoridae family. It is
found in Laos, Vietnam, and possibly Cambodia. Its natural habitats are ...
Achilles tendon Posterior view of the foot and leg, showing the Achilles tendon (tendo calcaneus).
The gastrocnemius muscle is cut to expose the soleus. ...
Achilles’ tendon
Achilles tendon Posterior view of the foot and leg, showing the Achilles tendon (tendo calcaneus).
The gastrocnemius muscle is cut to expose the soleus. ...
Achilles tendon rupture Achilles tendon rupture commonly occurs as an acceleration injury e.g. pushing
off or jumping up. Diagnosis is made by clinical history; typically people ...
Achilles tendinitis Achilles tendinitis is tendinitis of the Achilles tendon, generally precipitated
... The Achilles tendon does not have good blood supply or cell activity, ...
osteoporosis
Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a disease of bone leading to an increased risk of fracture.
In osteoporosis the bone mineral density (BMD) is reduced, ...
Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a disease of bone in which the bone mineral density (BMD) is
reduced, bone microarchitecture is disrupted, and the amount and variety of ...
Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a disease of bone leading to an increased risk of fracture.
In osteoporosis the bone mineral density (BMD) is reduced, ...
periosteal fibroblasts
Bone healing The periosteal cells distal to the fracture gap develop into osteoblasts and form
woven bone. The fibroblasts within the granulation tissue also develop ...
Periosteum The periosteum consists of an outer "fibrous layer" and inner "cambium layer".
The fibrous layer contains fibroblasts while the cambium layer contains ...
Panosteitis [2] Panosteitis is characterized histologically by an increase in activity of
osteoblasts and fibroblasts in the periosteum, endosteum and bone marrow, ...
osteoblasts
Osteoblast An osteoblast (from the Greek words for "bone" and "germ" or embryonic) is a
mononucleate cell that is responsible for bone formation. ...
Osteostimulation Osteostimulation is a technique for healing bone injuries or defects, through
the active stimulation of osteoblast proliferation and differentiation as ...
Endochondral ossification The osteoblasts use the calcified cartilage matrix as a template to build ...
Formation of bone collar: The osteoblast secretes osteoid against the shaft of ...
callus
Callus A callus (or callous) is an especially toughened area of skin which has become
relatively thick and hard as a response to repeated contact or pressure. ...
Ashley Callus Ashley Callus (born March 10, 1979) is an Australian sprint freestyle swimmer,
who won a gold medal in the 4x100 m freestyle relay at the 2000 Sydney ...
Callus (cell biology) A callus is usually sustained on gel media, much in the same manner as bacteria
are grown. Sufficient media consists of agar and the usual mix of ...
arthrology
Did you mean anthology?
Arthrology Arthrology is the science concerned with the anatomy, function, dysfunction and
treatment of ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthrology" ...
Kazimierz Pelczar The main fields of medicine in which he worked and published many publications
were oncology, arthrology, cardiology, hematology and halth-resort science. ...
Medical roots and their derivations As a general rule, this -o- almost always acts as a joint-stem to connect two
constantal roots, e.g. arthr- + -o- + logy = arthrology. ...
fibrous joint
Joint Cartilaginous joints allow more movement between bones than a fibrous joint but
less than the highly mobile synovial joint. An example would be the joint ...
Synovial joint It secretes synovial fluid into the joint, which nourishes and lubricates the
articular cartilage. The synovium is separated from the capsule by a layer of ...
Joint capsule The fibrous capsule is attached to the whole circumference of the articular end
of each bone entering into the joint, and thus entirely surrounds the joint. ...
cartilaginous joint
Joint Depiction of an intervertebral disk, a cartilaginous joint. ... The two bone
surfaces at the joint are both covered in hyaline cartilage and joined by ...
Synovial joint In joints where the two surfaces do not fit snugly together, a meniscus or multiple
folds of fibro-cartilage within the joint correct the fit, ...
Synovial osteochondromatosis In this condition, cartilaginous metaplasia takes place within the synovial
membrane of the joint. Metaplastic synovium organizes into nodules. ...
hyaline cartilage
Hyaline cartilage Hyaline cartilage consists of a slimy mass of a firm consistency, but of considerable
elasticity and pearly bluish color. It contains no nerves or blood ...
Cartilage Hyaline cartilage is found lining bones in joints (articular cartilage or, ...
Articular Cartilage is a specialization of hyaline cartilage left on the ends ...
Elastic cartilage Elastic cartilage, histologically is similar to hyaline cartilage but contains
a plethora of elastic fibers. These fibers form bundles that appear dark ...
synovial membrane
Synovial fluid The inner membrane of synovial joints is called the synovial membrane, which
secretes synovial fluid into the joint cavity. This fluid forms a thin layer ...
Synovium Where the underlying subintima is loose the intima sits on a pliable membrane,
giving rise to the term synovial membrane. This membrane, together with the ...
Elbow All these articular surfaces are enveloped by a common synovial membrane, and
the movements of the whole joint should be studied together. ...
synovial fluid
Synovial fluid Synovial fluid is a thick, stringy fluid found in the cavities of synovial joints.
With its egg-like consistency (synovial comes from Latin for "egg"), ...
Synovium The water of synovial fluid is not secreted as such, but is effectively trapped in
... Excess synovial fluid weeping from inflamed synovium can provide a ...
Joint manipulation This sound is believed to be the result of a phenomenon known as cavitation
occurring within the synovial fluid of the joint. When a manipulation is ...
joint capsule
Joint capsule The joint capsule comprises Type A and B synoviocytes. Impurities in the synovial
fluid are removed by the Type A cells while the Type B cells secrete a ...
Capsule of temporomandibular joint Joint capsule. This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain
edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained ...
Capsule of hip joint The capsule is much thicker at the upper and forepart of the joint, where the
greatest amount of resistance is required; behind and below, it is thin and ...
bursa
Bursa Bursa (historically also known as Brusa, Greek: ???????, Prusa) is a city in
northwestern Turkey and the seat of Bursa Province. ...
Bursa (anatomy) A bursa (plural bursae or bursas; Latin: Bursa synovialis) is a small fluid-filled
sac located at the point where a muscle or tendon slides across bone. ...
Bursa Malaysia The Bursa Malaysia or Malaysia Exchange, MYX previously known as Kuala Lumpur
Stock Exchange (KLSE, Bursa Saham Kuala Lumpur in Malay) dates back to 1930 ...
bursitis
Bursitis Bursitis is the inflammation of one or more bursae, or small sacs of synovial
fluid, in the body. Bursae rest at the points where internal functionaries, ...
Prepatellar bursitis Prepatellar bursitis, also known as housemaid's knee, is a common cause of swelling
and pain above the patella (kneecap), and is due to inflammation of the ...
Olecranon bursitis Bursitis normally develops as a result either of a single injury to the elbow,
or perhaps more commonly due to repeated minor injuries, such as may be ...
hinge
Hinge A hinge is a type of bearing that connects two solid objects, typically allowing
only a limited angle of rotation between them. Hinges may be made of ...
User talk:Mairy hinge User talk:Mairy hinge. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation,
search. Welcome to Wikipedia. We invite everyone to contribute ...
Hinge joint In the hinge joint (ginglymus), the articular surfaces are moulded to each other
in such a manner as to permit motion only in one plane, ...
hinge joint
Hinge joint In the hinge joint (ginglymus), the articular surfaces are moulded to each other
in such a manner as to permit motion only in one plane, ...
Gliding joint A gliding joint (arthrodial joint, plane articulation) is a joint which admits of
... Condyloid joint, Saddle joint, Ball and socket joint, Gliding joint) ...
Pivot joint Pivot joint (trochoid joint, rotary joint): Where the movement is limited to
rotation, the joint is formed by a pivot-like process turning within a ring, ...
ball and socket joint
Ball and socket joint A ball and socket joint (enarthrosis, spheroidal joint) is a joint in which the
distal bone is capable of motion around an indefinite number of axes, ...
Joint These are further classified into ball and socket joints, condyloid joints, saddle
joints, hinge joints, pivot joints, and gliding joints. ...
Ground glass joint For ball and socket joints, the inner joint is a ball and the outer joint is a
socket, ... For either standard taper joints or ball and socket joints, ...
pivot joint
Pivot joint Pivot joint (trochoid joint, rotary joint): Where the movement is limited to
rotation, the joint is formed by a pivot-like process turning within a ring, ...
Gliding joint A gliding joint (arthrodial joint, plane articulation) is a joint which admits of
... Condyloid joint, Saddle joint, Ball and socket joint, Gliding joint) ...
Hinge joint In the hinge joint (ginglymus), the articular surfaces are moulded to each other
in such a manner as to permit motion only in one plane, ...
flexion
Flexion In anatomy, flexion is a position that is made possible by the joint angle decreasing.
The skeletal (bones, cartilage, and ligaments) and muscular (muscles ...
Anatomical terms of motion Extension - The opposite of flexion; a straightening movement that ... It consists
of a combination of flexion, extension, adduction, and abduction. ...
Flexion test A flexion test is a veterinary proceedure performed on a horse, generally during
a prepurchase or a lameness exam. The animal's leg is held in a flexed ...
extension
Extension System Extension, a particular type of this software on the classic Mac OS ·
Extension (Mozilla), this type of software for Firefox and other Mozilla ...
Extension (Mozilla) Extensions, also known as add-ons, are installable enhancements to the Mozilla
Foundation's projects (and compatible variants such as Portable Firefox), ...
Filename extension A filename extension is a suffix to the name of a computer file applied to show
its format. It is commonly used to infer information about what sort of data ...
adduction
Adduction Adduction is a movement which brings a limb - arm or leg - closer to the sagittal
plane of the ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adduction" ...
Anatomical terms of motion Adduction - A motion that pulls a structure or part towards the midline of ...
It consists of a combination of flexion, extension, adduction, and abduction. ...
Extraocular muscles Elevation, adduction: Superior rectus, Elevation, abduction: inferior oblique.
Adduction: Medial rectus, Abduction: Lateral rectus. Depression, adduction: ...
abduction
Abduction Abduction may refer to:. Kidnapping, as a near synonym in criminal law, but
sometimes used particularly in cases involving a woman or child ...
Abductive reasoning Abduction, or inference to the best explanation, is a method of reasoning in ...
The term abduction is also sometimes used to just mean the generation of ...
Child abduction Perhaps the most feared (although not the most common) kind of abduction is
removal by a stranger. The stereotypical version of stranger abduction is the ...
circumduction
Anatomical terms of motion Circumduction - The circular (or, more precisely, conical) movement of a body
part, such as a ball-and-socket joint or the eye. It consists of a combination ...
Kinesiology region, flexion/extension · abduction/adduction · internal/external rotation,
circumduction, other. Shoulder, yes, Serratus anterior/Rhomboid major, ...
Ball and socket joint Movements are flexion-extension, abduction-adduction, and rotation (triaxial)
and circumduction;. The ball-and-socket joint is a movable joint, ...
arthritis
Arthritis Arthritis (from Greek arthro-, joint + -itis, inflammation; plural: arthritides)
is a group of conditions where there is damage caused to the joints of the ...
Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis / Osteoarthrosis (OA, also known as degenerative arthritis,
degenerative joint disease, arthrosis or in more colloquial terms "wear and ...
Rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is traditionally considered a chronic, inflammatory
autoimmune disorder that causes the immune system to attack the joints. ...
rheumatoid
Rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is traditionally considered a chronic, inflammatory
autoimmune disorder that causes the immune system to attack the joints. ...
Rheumatoid factor Rheumatoid factor (RF or RhF) is a blood test performed in patients with suspected
rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is an antibody against the Fc portion of ...
Rheumatoid factor Rheumatoid factor (RF or RhF) is a blood test performed in patients with suspected
rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is an antibody against the Fc portion of ...
osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis / Osteoarthrosis (OA, also known as degenerative arthritis,
degenerative joint disease, arthrosis or in more colloquial terms "wear and ...
Arthritis The most common form of arthritis, osteoarthritis is also known as degenerative
joint ... Osteoarthritis is classically worse at night or following rest. ...
Glucosamine Oral glucosamine is commonly used for the treatment of osteoarthritis.
Since glucosamine is a precursor for glycosaminoglycans, and glycosaminoglycans are a ...
trauma
Trauma Blunt force trauma, a type of physical trauma caused by impact or other force
applied from or with a blunt object; Penetrating trauma, a type of physical ...
Physical trauma Physical trauma refers to a physical injury. A trauma patient is someone who has
suffered serious and life-threatening physical injury potentially resulting ...
Psychological trauma Psychological trauma is a type of damage to the psyche that occurs as a result
of a traumatic event. When that trauma leads to Post Traumatic Stress ...
--- 9/12/07 Lecture 7 Skeletal System 6
sulfated glucosaminoglycans
Did you mean sulfated glycosaminoglycans?
collagenous
Collagen Collagen is the main protein of connective tissue in animals and the most abundant
protein in mammals, [1] making up about 25% of the total protein content. ...
Collagenous colitis Collagenous colitis is an inflammatory colonic disease with peak incidence in
the 5th decade of life, affecting women more than men. ...
Collagen XVII Collagen XVII, previously called BP180, is a transmembrane protein which plays
a critical role in maintaining the linkage between the intracellular and the ...
collagen
Collagen Collagen is the main protein of connective tissue in animals and the most abundant
protein in mammals, [1] making up about 25% of the total protein content. ...
Collagen helix In collagen, the collagen helix, or type 2 helix, is a major shape in quaternary
structure. It consists of a triple helix made of the repetitious amino acid ...
Type-III collagen Type-III collagen is a fibrous scleroprotein in bone and cartilage and tendon
and other connective tissue; yields gelatin on boiling. ...
cross-linked
Cross-link Once a substance is cross-linked, the product is very hard or impossible to recycle.
In some cases, though, if the cross-link bonds are sufficiently ...
Cross-linked polyethylene Cross-linked polyethylene, commonly abbreviated PEX or XLPE, is a form of
polyethylene with cross-links. It is formed into tubing, and is used predominantly ...
Cross-linked enzyme aggregate In biochemistry, a cross-linked enzyme aggregate is a immobilized enzyme prepared
via crosslinking. They can be used as stereoselective industrial ...
hyaline
Hyaline In common medical histopathological usage, hyaline is a substance with a glassy,
pink appearance after haematoxylin and eosin staining?most often an ...
Hyaline cartilage Hyaline cartilage consists of a slimy mass of a firm consistency, but of considerable
elasticity and pearly bluish color. It contains no nerves or blood ...
Infant respiratory distress syndrome - Wikipedia, the free ... Hyaline membranes are composed of fibrin, cellular debris, ... Most cases of
hyaline membrane disease can be ameliorated or prevented if mothers who are ...
nostrils
Nostril A nostril (or naris, pl. nares) is one of the two channels of the nose, from the
point where they bifurcate to the external opening. In birds and mammals, ...
Choana Fish don't have choana, instead they have a pair of external nostrils: two tubes
whose frontal openings lie close to the upper jaw, and the posterior ...
Pratiloma ujjayi Pratiloma Ujjayi utilises alternate nostril breathing and Ujjayi in an way that
... Ujjayi is practiced with both nostrils open, when one is blocked breath ...
larynx
Larynx The larynx (plural larynges), colloquially known as the voicebox, is an organ in
the neck of mammals involved in protection of the trachea and sound ...
Laryngeal cancer Laryngeal cancer may also be called cancer of the larynx or laryngeal carcinoma.
Most laryngeal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, reflecting their ...
Mechanical larynx A mechanical larynx is a medical device used to produce clearer speech by those
who have lost their original voicebox, usually due to cancer of the larynx. ...
trachea
Trachea Vertebrate trachea, in terrestrial vertebrates, such as birds and humans, the
trachea allows oxygen and carbon dioxide to move from the throat to the lungs ...
Vertebrate trachea The trachea, or windpipe, is a tube that has an inner diameter of about 20-25 mm
and a length of about 10-16cm. It extends from the larynx to the primary ...
Invertebrate trachea Chapter 25: The Open Hemolymph System of Holometabola and Its Relation to the
Tracheal Space. In "Microscopic Anatomy of Invertebrates". Wiley-Liss, Inc.. ...
bronchi
Bronchus A bronchus (plural bronchi, adjective bronchial) is a caliber of airway in the
respiratory tract that conducts air into the lungs. ...
Secondary bronchus Secondary bronchi (also known as lobar bronchi) arise from the primary bronchi,
with each one serving as the airway to a specific lobe of the lung. ...
Tertiary bronchus The tertiary bronchi (also known as the segmental bronchi) arise from the secondary
bronchi. The respiratory epithelium lining their lumen is surrounded by ...
embryonic skeleton
Cartilage In addition, hyaline cartilage forms most of the embryonic skeleton. Articular
Cartilage is a specialization of hyaline cartilage left on the ends of long ...
Cartilage During embryonic development, cartilage is enclosed in a dense connective tissue
... In addition, hyaline cartilage forms most of the embryonic skeleton. ...
Elephant Bird The specimen is intact and contains an embryonic skeleton of the unborn bird.
Reconstruction of Elephant Bird Egg, Ipswich Museum, England ...
external ear
Ear The outer ear is the most external portion of the ear. The outer ear includes
the pinnae (also called auricle), the ear canal, and the very most superficial ...
Outer ear Outer ear. External and middle ear, opened from the front. Right side. The auricula.
Lateral surface. Gray's · subject #229 1033 · MeSH · External+Ear ...
Inner ear The vestibular system of the inner ear is responsible for the sensations of
balance and motion. It uses the same kinds of fluids and detection cells (hair ...
epiglottis
Epiglottis The epiglottis is a lid-like flap of elastic cartilage tissue covered with a
mucus membrane, attached to the root of the tongue. ...
Laryngomalacia The shortened aryepiglottic folds cause the epiglottis to be furled on itself.
This is the well known "omega shaped" epiglottis in laryngomalacia. ...
Epiglottitis Epiglottitis is inflammation of the epiglottis - the cartilage that covers the
... Epiglottitis involves bacterial infection of the epiglottis, most often ...
glottis
Glottis Sound production involving only the glottis is called glottal. English has a
voiceless glottal fricative spelled "h". In many accents of English the glottal ...
Glottal consonant Glottal consonants are consonants articulated with the glottis. Many phoneticians
consider them, or at least the so-called fricatives, to be transitional ...
Phonation (Note that Mazatec is a tonal language, so the glottis is making several tonal
... However, at least two supra-glottal phonations appear to be widespread in ...
Eustachian tube
Eustachian tube The Eustachian tube (or auditory tube) is a tube that links the pharynx to the
middle ear. In adults the Eustachian tube is approximately 35 mm long. ...
Patulous Eustachian tube Patulous Eustachian tube is the name of a rare physical disorder where the
Eustachian tube, which is normally closed, instead stays intermittently open. ...
Otitis media The rhinoviruses (nose viruses) that cause the common cold infect the eustachian
tube that goes from the back of the nose to the middle ear, ...
intramembranous
Intramembranous ossification Intramembranous ossification is one of two types of bone formation and is the
process responsible for the development of flat bones, especially those found ...
Bone 8.1 Intramembranous ossification; 8.2 Endochondral ossification .... Intramembranous
ossification mainly occurs during formation of the flat bones of the ...
User:Figma/Sandbox Intramembranous ossification mainly occurs during formation of the flat bones of
the skull; ... The steps in intramembranous ossification are: ...
endochondral
Endochondral ossification Endochondral ossification is one of two types of bone formation (ossification)
and is the process responsible for much of the bone growth in vertebrate ...
Osteichthyes One of the best-known innovations of the osteichthians is endochondral bone or
... This is the unique endochondral bone from which the osteichthians derived ...
Bone Endochondral ossification, on the other hand, occurs in long bones, such as limbs;
... Endochondral ossification begins with points in the cartilage called ...
epiphysis
Epiphysis This article is about the rounded end of a bone. For information on the endocrine
gland also referred to as epiphysis, see epiphysis cerebri. ...
Slipped Upper Femoral Epiphysis Slipped Upper Femoral Epiphysis is a common cause of hip and knee pain in children
aged 10-17. It is the most common hip disorder in adolescence. ...
Slipped capital femoral epiphysis Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a medical term referring to a fracture
through the epiphyseal growth plate. The capital (head of the femur) ...
diaphysis
Diaphysis The diaphysis is the main or mid section (shaft) of a long bone. It is usually
filled with Yellow Cartilage, which is made mostly of adipose (fat). ...
Bone Long bones are longer than they are wide, consisting of a long shaft (the diaphysis)
plus two articular (joint) surfaces, called epiphyses. ...
User:Figma/Sandbox Long bones are longer than they are wide, consisting of a long shaft (the diaphysis)
plus two articular (joint) surfaces, called epiphyses. ...
epiphyseal disc
Bone epiphyseal plate, The thin disc of hyaline cartilage between the diaphysis and
epiphyses; disappears by twenty years of age. Also known as the growth plate ...
User:Figma/Sandbox epiphyseal plate, The thin disc of hyaline cartilage between the diaphysis and
epiphyses; disappears by twenty years of age. Also known as the growth plate ...
ICD-10 Chapter XIII: Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and ... (M51.0) Lumbar and other intervertebral disc disorders with myelopathy; (M51.1)
Lumbar and other .... (M93.0) Slipped upper femoral epiphysis (nontraumatic) ...
compact bone
Bone The hard outer layer of bones is composed of compact bone tissue, so-called due
to its minimal gaps and spaces. This tissue gives bones their smooth, white, ...
Cortical bone Cortical bone, also known as compact bone is one of two main types of osseous
tissues. Cortical bone is dense and forms the surface of bones, ...
Ulna Below the coronoid process there is a small area of compact bone from which
trabeculæ curve upward to end obliquely to the surface of the semilunar notch ...
spongy bone
Cancellous bone Microscopic view of spongy bone. Bone trabeculae appear red in this stain. ...
Cancellous bone (also known as trabecular, or spongy) is a type of osseous ...
Bone Filling the interior of the organ is the trabecular bone tissue (an open cell
porous network also called cancellous or spongy bone) which is comprised of a ...
Osteichthyes Structurally, the effect is to create a relatively lightweight, flexible, "spongy"
bone interior, surrounded by an outline of dense, lamellar periostial ...
Haversian systems
Osteon Osteons (also called Haversian system in honor of Clopton Havers) are predominant
structures found in some lamellar or compact bone. Osteons are found in ...
Haversian canals Haversian canals (named after Clopton Havers) are a series of tubes around narrow
... diaphysis), structure (osteon/Haversian system, Haversian canals, ...
Bone Their main features are a haversian canal in the centre, surrounded by lamellae,
.... diaphysis), structure (osteon/Haversian system, Haversian canals, ...
Haversian canals
Haversian canals Haversian canals (named after Clopton Havers) are a series of tubes around narrow
channels formed by lamellae. This is the region of bone called compact ...
Osteon Pfeiffer, Susan; Crowder, Christian; Harrington, Lesley; and Brown, Brown
2006 "Secondary Osteon and Haversian Canal Dimensions as Behavioral Indicators," ...
Physiology of dinosaurs Armand de Ricqles discovered Haversian canals in dinosaur bones. [18] These canals
are common in "warm-blooded" animals and are associated with fast growth ...
lamellae
Lamella Lamella is a term for a plate-like structure, appearing in multiples, that occurs
in various situations, such as biology or materials sciences. ...
Lamella (zoology) A lamella is a thin plate-like structure, often one amongst many lamellae very
close to one another, with open space between. Aside from respiratory organs, ...
Thylakoid Grana are connected by stroma thylakoids, also called intergrana thylakoids or
lamellae. Grana thylakoids and stroma thylakoids can be distinguished by ...
lacunae
Lacuna Generally, a lacuna is a gap. The term may refer to: ... Lacuna (comics) a
fictional Marvel Comics superhero and associate of X-Statix. ...
Lacuna (histology) X 100. a, Haversian canals; b, lacunae seen from the side; c, others seen from
the surface in lamellae, which are cut horizontally. ...
Lacunae of Morgagni Lacunae of Morgagni, also called the urethral lacunae of the male urethra (lacunae
urethrales urethrae masculinae or the crypts of Morgagni, ...
canaliculi
Lacrimal canaliculi The lacrimal canaliculi, also known as the lacrimal canals or lacrimal ducts,
are the small channels in each eyelid that commence at minute orifices, ...
Bile canaliculus Bile canaliculus (plural:bile canaliculi; also called bile capillaries) is a thin
tube that collects bile secreted by hepatocytes. The bile canaliculi merge ...
Canaliculus A canaliculus is an anatomical term used to describe a small passageway. [1].
Examples include:. Canaliculus (bone), a small channel found in ossified bone ...
Volkmann’s canals
Did you mean Volkmann's canals?
Nago-Torbole At the same time Volkmann teaches me that this lake was formerly called Benacus,
.... ORA It?s the most constant and famous wind. It blows on Torbole with a ...
American modernism Strasser, S. (1989): Satisfaction Guaranteed: The Making of the American Mass
Market. New York: Pantheon Books. Volkmann, L. (2006): "Ikonen des neuen ...
List of diseases (C) Congenital m-Congenital s ... Congenital stenosis of cervical medullary canal ·
Congenital sucrose isomaltose malabsorption · Congenital syphilis ...
osteoblasts, -cytes, -clasts
Osteoblast An osteoblast (from the Greek words for "bone" and "germ" or embryonic) is a
mononucleate cell that is responsible for bone formation. ...
Osteostimulation Osteostimulation is a technique for healing bone injuries or defects, through
the active stimulation of osteoblast proliferation and differentiation as ...
Endochondral ossification The osteoblasts use the calcified cartilage matrix as a template to build ...
Formation of bone collar: The osteoblast secretes osteoid against the shaft of ...
--- 9/14/07 Lecture 8 Skeletal, Muscular Systems
parathyroid gland
Parathyroid gland The parathyroid glands are small endocrine glands in the neck, usually located
behind the thyroid gland, which produce parathyroid hormone. ...
Parathyroid hormone Parathyroid hormone (PTH), or parathormone, is secreted by the parathyroid glands
as a polypeptide containing 84 amino acids. ...
Sestamibi scan A sestamibi scan of the parathyroid gland is a nuclear medicine procedure which
is performed to identify hyperparathyroidism (or parathyroid adenoma). ...
parathormone
Parathyroid hormone Parathyroid hormone (PTH), or parathormone, is secreted by the parathyroid glands
as a polypeptide containing 84 amino acids. ...
Parathyroid gland Parathyroid hormone (PTH, also known as parathormone) is a small protein that
takes part in the control of calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, ...
Wikipedia:WikiProject Clinical medicine/categorizations ... ... gonadotropins insulin insulin analogs amylin glucagon somatostatin analogs
chorionic gonadotropin parathormone analogs IGF1 ACTH peptides desmopressin ...
musculus
House Mouse The common House Mouse (Mus musculus) is one of the most numerous species of the
genus Mus equivalent to the common term mouse. ...
Blue Whale The Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) is a marine mammal belonging to the suborder
of ... The specific name musculus is Latin and could mean "muscular", ...
Mouse The best known mouse species is the common house mouse (Mus musculus). It is
found in nearly all countries and, as the laboratory mouse, ...
deltoid
Deltoid Deltoid can refer to:. The deltoid muscle, a muscle in the shoulder; Kite (geometry),
... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deltoid" ...
Deltoid muscle The anterior deltoid is weak in strict transverse flexion but assists the pectoralis
major during shoulder transverse flexion / shoulder flexion (elbow ...
Deltoid curve In geometry, a deltoid is a hypocycloid of three cusps. A deltoid can be represented
by the following parametric equations ...
brevis
Ars longa, vita brevis for the album by The Nice, see Ars Longa Vita Brevis (album). Ars longa, vita
brevis is part of an aphorism by Ancient Greek physician Hippocrates. ...
Adductor brevis muscle Structures surrounding right hip-joint. (Adductor brevis at upper right.) ...
The adductor brevis is a muscle in the thigh situated immediately behind the ...
Missa Brevis A missa brevis (Latin) is, literally, a "short Mass". It is a popular form of
choral composition, particularly in the twentieth century. ...
longus
Longus Longus (Greek: ??????) was a Greek novelist and romancer, and author of Daphnis
and Chloe. Very little is known of his life, and it is assumed that he lived ...
Peroneus longus In human anatomy, the peroneus longus (also known as fibularis longus) is a
superficial muscle in the lateral compartment of the leg, and acts to evert and ...
Adductor longus muscle The adductor longus muscle is a muscle of the human body. It is a part of the
adductor group of the thigh, that as the name suggests adducts the thigh. ...
extensor carpi radialis longus
Extensor carpi radialis longus muscle - Wikipedia, the free ... Extensor carpi radialis longus is one of the five main muscles that control
movement at the wrist. This muscle is quite long, starting on the lateral side ...
Flexor carpi ulnaris muscle Flexor carpi ulnaris is the most medial (closest to the little finger) of these.
(The most lateral one is flexor carpi radialis muscle, and the middle one, ...
Extensor carpi ulnaris muscle The Extensor carpi ulnaris extends the wrist, but when acting alone inclines the
hand toward the ulnar side; by its continued action it extends the ...
biceps
Biceps A biceps is a muscle from either of two muscle pairs (right and left) in the body.
Biceps is the Latin adjective meaning two-headed. ...
Biceps brachii muscle In human anatomy, the biceps brachii is a muscle located on the upper arm.
The biceps has several functions, the most important simply being to flex the ...
Biceps femoris muscle The biceps femoris is a muscle of the posterior thigh. As its name implies, it
has two parts, one of which (the long head) forms part of the hamstrings ...
triceps
Triceps brachii muscle The triceps brachii muscle is often simply called the triceps (both singular and
plural). However, the term triceps (Latin for "three-headed") can mean any ...
Triceps surae The triceps surae is a term given by some anatomists to the gastrocnemius and
soleus muscles together as they both insert into the calcaneus, ...
Lying triceps extensions Lying triceps extensions, also known as skull crushers and French extensions, is
one of the most stimulating exercises to the entire triceps muscle group in ...
quadriceps
Quadriceps femoris muscle The quadriceps femoris (quadriceps, quadriceps extensor, or quads) includes the
four prevailing muscles on the front of the thigh. ...
Vastus medialis ... the 'teardrop' muscle, is a medially located muscle of the quadriceps. ...
into the medial border of the patella and the Quadriceps femoris tendon, ...
Quadriceps tendon In human anatomy, the quadriceps tendon connects the quadriceps femoris muscles
to the superior aspects of the patella on the anterior of the thigh. ...
biceps brachii
Biceps brachii muscle In human anatomy, the biceps brachii is a muscle located on the upper arm.
The biceps has several functions, the most important simply being to flex the ...
Triceps brachii muscle The triceps brachii muscle is a large three-headed skeletal muscle found in humans.
... often neglect this group of muscles in favor of the biceps brachii. ...
Musculocutaneous nerve The branches to the Biceps brachii and Brachialis are given off after the ...
The nerve may pass under the Coracobrachialis or through the Biceps brachii. ...
biceps femoris
Biceps femoris muscle The biceps femoris is a muscle of the posterior thigh. As its name implies, it
has two parts, one of which (the long head) forms part of the hamstrings ...
Biceps femoris tendon avulsion The biceps femoris is commonly injured in sports that require explosive bending
of the knee as seen in sprinting. If the athlete is fatigued or has not ...
Hamstring The short head of the biceps femoris, with its divergent origin and ... The long
head of the biceps femoris extends the hip as when beginning to walk; ...
intercostals
Intercostal muscle the external intercostal muscles, which aid in quiet and forced inhalation.
They originate on ribs 1-11 and have their insertion on ribs 2-12. ...
Posterior intercostal arteries The 1st and 2nd posterior intercostal arteries arise from the supreme intercostal
artery, a branch of the costocervical trunk of the subclavian artery. ...
Muscles of respiration The principal muscles are the external intercostal, the intercondral part of the
... The last layer is the innermost intercostals and consists of three ...
temporalis
Temporalis muscle As with the other muscles of mastication, control of the temporalis muscle comes
from the third (mandibular) branch of the trigeminal nerve. ...
Squama temporalis Its outer surface is smooth and convex; it affords attachment to the temporalis
muscle, and forms part of the temporal fossa; on its hinder part is a ...
Red-browed Finch The Red-browed Finch Neochmia temporalis is an estrildid finch that inhabits the
east coast of Australia. This species is also been introduced to French ...
sternocleidomastoid
Sternocleidomastoid muscle In human anatomy, the sternocleidomastoid (pronounced /?st?.no?kli.d??mæs.t???d/)
muscles are anterior muscles in the neck that act to flex and rotate the ...
Accessory nerve disorder Interruption of the nerve supply to the sternocleidomastoid muscle results in an
asymmetric neckline, while weakness of the trapezius muscle can produce a ...
Accessory nerve The spinal accessory nerve provides motor innervation from the central nervous
system to two muscles of the neck: the sternocleidomastoid muscle and the ...
supinators
Flexor muscle Other types of muscles include: abductors, adductors, supinators and rotators In
humans, some muscles include 'flexor' in their name. Some examples are: ...
Forearm The forearm contains many muscles, including the flexors and extensors of the
digits, a flexor of the elbow (brachioradialis), and pronators and supinators ...
Forearm The forearm contains many muscles, including the flexors and extensors of the
digits, a flexor of the elbow (brachioradialis), and pronators and supinators ...
pronators
Foot type Pronation is the rolling motion of the foot from heel to toe while walking,
jogging, or running. Pronation includes Neutral Pronation, Underpronation, ...
Forearm Anterior, superficial, pronator teres, I, median. Anterior, superficial (or
intermediate) ... Anterior, deep, pronator quadratus, I, median ...
Forearm Anterior, superficial, pronator teres, I, median. Anterior, superficial (or
intermediate) ... Anterior, deep, pronator quadratus, I, median ...
prime mover
Prime mover The term prime mover is an English translation of the Latin Primum Mobile.
The original latin refers to a "first cause" of motion in the theological sense, ...
Cosmological argument The Prime Mover did not organize matter physically, but is instead a Being ...
Plato's demiurge and Aristotle's Prime Mover each referred to a being who, ...
Prime Movers The Prime Movers were a blues band based in the Detroit area, formed in 1965.
Robert Vinopal left soon after the band's formation and was replaced by Jack ...
antagonist
Antagonist An antagonist is that against which the protagonist contends. ... Retrieved
from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antagonist" ...
Receptor antagonist In pharmacology an antagonist is a binding partner (ligand) of a receptor that
inhibits the function of an agonist or inverse agonist by blocking its ...
H?-receptor antagonist An H2-receptor antagonist, (H2RA) often shortened to H2 antagonist, is a drug
used to block the action of histamine on parietal cells in the stomach, ...
brachioradialis
Brachioradialis Brachioradialis is a muscle of the forearm that acts to flex the forearm at the
elbow. It is also capable of both pronation and supination, depending on the ...
User talk:Arcadian The serious error is at brachioradialis, where the seer image shows the brachioradialis
... I really like the image gallery you put into brachioradialis. ...
Posterior compartment of the forearm - Wikipedia, the free ... The Brachioradialis, flexor of the forearm, is unusual in that it is located in
... mobile wad (brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis) ...
occipitofrontalis
Occipitofrontalis muscle Some sources consider the Occipitofrontalis to be a structure consisting of two
distinct muscles, the Frontalis and the Occipitalis. ...
Frontalis muscle Frontalis. Visible at top left. Latin, venter frontalis musculi occipitofrontalis.
Gray's · subject #105 379 · Origin: · galea aponeurosis ...
Occipitalis muscle Visible at center right. Occipital bone. Outer surface. (Red circle at upper
right is for occipitalis.) Latin, venter occipitalis musculi occipitofrontalis ...
occipitalis
Occipitalis muscle The Occipitalis, thin and quadrilateral in form, arises by tendinous fibers from
the lateral two-thirds of the superior nuchal line of the occipital bone, ...
Squama occipitalis That part of the squama which lies above the highest nuchal lines is named the
planum occipitale and is covered by the Occipitalis muscle. ...
Liolaemus occipitalis Liolaemus occipitalis is a species of lizard in the Iguanidae family. It is
endemic to Brazil. Its natural habitat is sandy shores. ...
gala aponeurotica
orbicularis oculi
Orbicularis oculi muscle The orbicularis oculi arises from the nasal part of the frontal bone, from the
frontal process of the maxilla in front of the lacrimal groove, ...
Facial Action Coding System ... smile: contraction of zygomatic major and inferior part of orbicularis oculi.
... labii inferioris or relaxation of Mentalis, or Orbicularis oris ...
Corrugator supercilii muscle The Corrugator supercilii is a small, narrow, pyramidal muscle, placed at the
medial end of the eyebrow, beneath the Frontalis and Orbicularis oculi. ...
levator palpebrae
Levator palpebrae superioris muscle The levator palpebrae superioris (or levator muscle of upper eyelid) is the muscle
in the orbit that elevates the superior (upper) eyelid. ...
Marcus Gunn phenomenon ... with an inhibition of the branch of the oculomotor nerve to the levator
palpebrae superioris, as opposed to stimulation in Marcus Gunn jaw-winking. ...
Superior tarsal muscle The superior tarsal muscle (Müller's Muscle) is a smooth muscle adjoining the
levator palpebrae superioris muscle that helps to raise the upper eyelid. ...
ptosis
Ptosis (eyelid) In ophthalmology, ptosis is an abnormally low position (drooping) of the upper
eyelid which may grow more or less severe during the day. ...
Ptosis Look up Ptosis in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Ptosis (?????? "falling, a
fall") refers to droopiness of any body part. Specifically, it can refer to: ...
Ptosis (breasts) Breast Ptosis, or sagging breasts is a medical term for the drooping or sagging
of the breast. Some women have this condition naturally whereas many won't ...
buccinator
Buccinator muscle The buccinator is a thin quadrilateral muscle, occupying the interval between
the maxilla and the mandible at the side of the face. ...
Buccinator From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search. Buccinator can
refer to: ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buccinator" ...
Trumpeter Swan The Trumpeter Swan, Cygnus buccinator is the largest native North American bird,
... Wikimedia Commons has media related to:. Cygnus buccinator ...
orbicularis oris
Orbicularis oris muscle The Orbicularis oris is not a simple sphincter muscle like the Orbicularis oculi;
it consists of numerous strata of muscular fibers surrounding the orifice ...
Orbicularis oculi muscle The orbicularis oculi arises from the nasal part of the frontal bone, from the
frontal ... mouth · levator anguli oris/depressor anguli oris - levator labii ...
Depressor anguli oris muscle At its origin it is continuous with the Platysma, and at its insertion with the
Orbicularis oris and Risorius; some of its fibers are directly continuous ...
mastication
Mastication Mastication or chewing is the process by which food is mashed and crushed by teeth.
It is the first step of digestion and it increases the surface area of ...
Mouthfeel Chewiness: Number of chews (at 1 chew/sec) needed to masticate the sample ...
Mouthcoating: Type and degree of coating in the mouth after mastication (for ...
Horace Fletcher Fletcher argued that his mastication method will increase the amount of strength
a person could have while actually decreasing the amount of food that they ...
trapezius
Trapezius muscle In human anatomy, the trapezius is a large superficial muscle on a person's back.
It is innervated by the accessory nerve (Cranial Nerve 11), ...
Trapezius muscles (cat) The Trapezius muscles are a set of muscles found in mammals. In the cat they are
three thin flat muscles that cover the back, and to a lesser extent, ...
Trapezius muscle In human anatomy, the trapezius is a large superficial muscle on a person's back.
It is innervated by the accessory nerve (Cranial Nerve 11), ...
ligamentum nuchae
Nuchal ligament Outer surface. (Nuchal lines are identified at left.) Seventh cervical vertebra.
(Spinous process visible at bottom.) Latin, ligamentum nuchae ...
Serratus posterior superior muscle It arises by a thin and broad aponeurosis from the lower part of the ligamentum
nuchae, from the spinous processes of the seventh cervical and upper two or ...
Splenius capitis muscle The splenius capitis arises from the lower half of the ligamentum nuchæ, from
the spinousial process of the seventh cervical vertebra, and from the spinous ...
--- 9/17/07 Lecture 9 Muscular System 1
ligamentum nuchae
Nuchal ligament Outer surface. (Nuchal lines are identified at left.) Seventh cervical vertebra.
(Spinous process visible at bottom.) Latin, ligamentum nuchae ...
Serratus posterior superior muscle It arises by a thin and broad aponeurosis from the lower part of the ligamentum
nuchae, from the spinous processes of the seventh cervical and upper two or ...
Splenius capitis muscle The splenius capitis arises from the lower half of the ligamentum nuchæ, from
the spinousial process of the seventh cervical vertebra, and from the spinous ...
thoracolumbar fascia
Thoracolumbar fascia The thoracolumbar fascia (lumbodorsal fascia) is a deep investing membrane which
covers the deep muscles of the back of the trunk. ...
Thoracolumbar fascia The thoracolumbar fascia (lumbodorsal fascia) is a deep investing membrane which
covers the deep muscles of the back of the trunk. ...
Fascia The rectus sheath and the thoracolumbar fascia provide strong fascial support
between the bottom of the ribcage and the top of the pelvis. ...
intertubercular groove of
Intertubercular groove The tubercles of the humerus are separated from each other by a deep groove, the
intertubercular groove (bicipital groove, sulcus intertubercular), ...
Humerus Pectoralis major, teres major and latissimus dorsi, which all insert at the
intertubercular groove of the humerus, adduct and medially rotate the humerus. ...
Upper extremity of humerus The tubercles are separated from each other by a deep groove, the intertubercular
groove (bicipital groove), which lodges the long tendon of the biceps ...
humerus
Humerus The humerus is a long bone in the arm or fore-legs (animals) that runs from the
shoulder to the elbow. On a skeleton, it fits between the scapula and the ...
Upper extremity of humerus The upper extremity of the humerus (proximal humerus) consists of a large rounded
head joined to the body by a constricted portion called the neck, ...
Trochlea of humerus The medial portion of the articular surface of the humerus is named the trochlea,
and presents a deep depression between two well-marked borders; ...
supraspinatus
Supraspinatus muscle The supraspinatus is a relatively small muscle of the upper limb that takes its
name from its origin from the supraspinous fossa superior to the spine of ...
Rotator cuff The most effective is the side-lying abduction, which activates the supraspinatus,
subscapularis and infraspinatus. The side-lying abduction involves the ...
Rotator cuff The most effective is the side-lying abduction, which activates the supraspinatus,
subscapularis and infraspinatus. The side-lying abduction involves the ...
infraspinatus
Infraspinatus muscle The Infraspinatus and Teres minor rotate the head of the humerus outward (external
rotation); they also assist in carrying the arm backward. ...
Rotator cuff The most effective is the side-lying abduction, which activates the supraspinatus,
subscapularis and infraspinatus. The side-lying abduction involves the ...
Teres minor muscle The Infraspinatus and Teres minor rotate the head of the humerus outward; ...
a group of muscle fibres from teres minor may be fused with Infraspinatus. ...
subscapularis
Subscapularis muscle Innervation to subscapularis is supplied by the upper and lower subscapular
nerves, branches of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. ...
Scapula The anterior (front) side of the scapula shows the fossa subscapularis (subscapular
fossa) to which the subscapularis muscle attaches. ...
Scapula The anterior (front) side of the scapula shows the fossa subscapularis (subscapular
fossa) to which the subscapularis muscle attaches. ...
teres minor
Teres minor muscle The Teres minor is a narrow, elongated muscle of the rotator cuff. ... Sometimes a
group of muscle fibres from teres minor may be fused with infraspinatus. ...
Teres major muscle #5 is Teres major muscle #6 is Teres minor muscle ... Teres major is a muscle of
the upper limb and one of six scapulohumeral muscles. ...
Axillary nerve The posterior branch (lower branch) supplies the Teres minor and the posterior
part of the Deltoideus; upon the branch to the Teres minor an oval ...
biceps brachii
Biceps brachii muscle In human anatomy, the biceps brachii is a muscle located on the upper arm.
The biceps has several functions, the most important simply being to flex the ...
Triceps brachii muscle The triceps brachii muscle is a large three-headed skeletal muscle found in humans.
... often neglect this group of muscles in favor of the biceps brachii. ...
Musculocutaneous nerve The branches to the Biceps brachii and Brachialis are given off after the ...
The nerve may pass under the Coracobrachialis or through the Biceps brachii. ...
upper margin of glenoid
Scapula At the upper part of the fossa is a transverse depression, ... It begins above
at the lower margin of the glenoid cavity, and inclines obliquely downward ...
Shoulder The glenohumeral joint is the main joint of the shoulder and the generic ....
deltoid, middle fibers, Arises from the lateral margin and upper surface of ...
Interclavicular ligament ... a curved direction from the upper part of the sternal end of one clavicle to
that of the other, and is also attached to the upper margin of the sternum. ...
fossa
Fossa (animal) The Fossa is a very agile animal. It can leap from tree to tree and display an
agility similar to squirrels. The Fossa is extremely cat-like in appearance ...
Fossa In anatomical terminology, fossa has come to mean a depression or hollow, typically
in a bone. Other parts of the body may be involved, for example the ...
Mandibular fossa In the temporal bone, the mandibular fossa (glenoid fossa) is bounded, in front,
by the articular tubercle; behind, by the tympanic part of the bone, ...
radial tuberosity
Radial tuberosity (Radial tuberosity visible at center right.) Bones of left forearm. Anterior aspect.
(Radius is bone on right. Radial tuberosity is visible at upper left ...
Upper extremity of radius Beneath the neck, on the medial side, is an eminence, the radial tuberosity; its
surface is divided into a posterior, rough portion, for the insertion of ...
Radial fossa Above the front part of the capitulum is a slight depression, the radial fossa,
... conoid tubercle - trapezoid line - costal tuberosity - subclavian groove ...
triceps brachii
Triceps brachii muscle The triceps brachii muscle is often simply called the triceps (both singular and
plural). However, the term triceps (Latin for "three-headed") can mean any ...
Profunda brachii It follows closely the radial nerve, running at first backward between the medial
and lateral heads of the triceps brachii, then along the groove for the ...
Posterior compartment of the arm The muscles of this compartment are the triceps brachii and anconeus muscle. ...
Some embryologists consider it as the fourth head of the triceps brachii. ...
infraglenoid tubercle
Infraglenoid tubercle (Infraglenoid tubercle labeled at center right.) ... The infraglenoid tubercle
is the part of the scapula to which the long head of the triceps brachii ...
Scapula Triceps Brachii (long head), origin, infraglenoid tubercle .... angles (superior,
inferior, lateral) - tubercles (infraglenoid, supraglenoid) ...
Greater tubercle The greater tubercle of the humerus is situated lateral to the head and lesser
tubercle. ... inferior, lateral) - tubercles (infraglenoid, supraglenoid) ...
supracondylar ridge
Lateral supracondylar ridge Bone: Lateral supracondylar ridge. Left humerus. Anterior view. (Lateral
supracondylar ridge on side at bottom right, but not labeled.) ...
Medial supracondylar ridge The inferior third of the medial border of the humerus is raised into a slight
ridge, the medial supracondylar ridge (or medial supracondylar line), ...
Body of humerus Its lower part forms a prominent, rough margin, a little curved from behind
forward, the lateral supracondylar ridge, which presents an anterior lip for the ...
styloid process
Styloid process In anatomy, a styloid process (from Greek stylos, "pillar"), usually serving as
points of attachment for muscles, refers to the slender, pointed process ...
Ulna Proximally, the ulna has a bony process, the olecranon process, a hook-like
structure that fits ... Distally (near the hand), there is a styloid process. ...
Temporal styloid process The styloid process is a slender pointed piece of bone just below the ear.
It projects down and forward from the inferior surface of the temporal bone, ...
flexor carpi ulnaris
Flexor carpi ulnaris muscle Flexor carpi ulnaris muscle arises by two heads - humeral and ulnar, connected
by a tendinous arch beneath which the ulnar nerve and ulnar artery pass. ...
Extensor carpi ulnaris muscle The Extensor carpi ulnaris extends the wrist, but when acting alone inclines the
hand toward the ulnar side; by its continued action it extends the ...
Flexor carpi radialis muscle This muscle starts at the medial epicondyle of the humerus (as does flexor carpi
ulnaris muscle) and attaches to the anterior side of the base of the 2nd ...
thenar eminence
Thenar eminence The thenar eminence is the body of muscle on the palm of the human hand just beneath
... A good way to remember what muscles are in the thenar eminence is ...
Hypothenar eminence Hypothenar eminence. The mucous sheaths of the tendons on the front of the wrist
... thenar and hypothenar muscles (deep) · thenar and hypothenar muscles ...
Thenar eminence A good way to remember what muscles are in the thenar eminence is - "OAF"; oafs
have big thenar eminences. 'O' = opponens, 'A' = abductor, 'F' = flexor. ...
rectus abdominus
Rectus abdominis muscle The rectus abdominis muscle is a paired muscle running vertically on each side
of the anterior wall of the human abdomen (and in some other animals). ...
Transversus abdominis muscle The muscle runs transverse and is the deepest of the major abdominal muscles (the
others being the rectus abdominis, and the internal and external obliques) ...
Arcuate line (anterior abdominal wall) - Wikipedia, the free ... Superior to the arcuate line, the internal oblique aponeurosis splits to envelope
the rectus abdominis muscle. Inferior to the arcuate line, the internal ...
external oblique
Abdominal external oblique muscle The external oblique muscle (of the abdomen) (also external abdominal oblique
muscle) is the largest and the most superficial (outermost) of the three flat ...
Aponeurosis of the Obliquus externus abdominis - Wikipedia, the ... The spermatic cord in the inguinal canal. (Aponeurosis of external oblique muscle
labeled at bottom center.) Gray's · subject #118 410 ...
Abdominal internal oblique muscle The internal oblique muscle (of the abdomen) is the intermediate muscle of the
abdomen, lying just underneath the external oblique and just above ...
internal oblique
Abdominal internal oblique muscle The internal oblique muscle (of the abdomen) is the intermediate muscle of the
abdomen, lying just underneath the external oblique and just above ...
Transversus abdominis muscle ... the rectus muscle and blend with the posterior lamella of the aponeurosis of
the internal oblique; its lower fourth is in front of the rectus abdominis. ...
Abdominal muscles (cat) There are four abdominal muscles in the cat, namely, External Oblique, Internal
Oblique, Transversus abdominis, and the Rectus Abdominis. ...
transversus
Transversus abdominis muscle The transversus abdominis muscle, also known as the transversalis muscle and
transverse abdominal muscle, is a muscle layer of the anterior and lateral ...
Transversus thoracis muscle The lowest fibers of this muscle are horizontal in their direction, and are
continuous with those of the Transversus abdominis; the intermediate fibers are ...
Transversus perinei superficialis muscle - Wikipedia, the free ... The Transversus perinei superficialis (Transversus perinei; Superficial transverse
perineal muscle) is a narrow muscular slip, which passes more or less ...
aponeuroses
Did you mean aponeurosis?
Aponeurosis When dissected, aponeuroses are papery, and peel off by sections. ... The ventral
abdominal aponeuroses are located just on top of the rectus abdominis ...
Arcuate line (anterior abdominal wall) - Wikipedia, the free ... Inferior to the arcuate line, the internal oblique and transversus abdominis
aponeuroses merge and pass superficial to the rectus muscle. ...
List of subjects in Gray's Anatomy: IV. Myology - Wikipedia, the ... 3 tendons, aponeuroses, and fasciae (Gray's s104). 3.1 Gray's page #376; 3.2 Gray's
page #377 ..... [edit] tendons, aponeuroses, and fasciae (Gray's s104) ...
umbilicus
Umbilicus The navel, or bellybutton; Umbilicus (mollusk), a feature of mollusk anatomy ·
Umbilicus (genus), a genus of plants including the species: Umbilicus ...
Umbilicus (genus) Umbilicus is a genus of 15-20 species of flowering plants in the family Crassulaceae.
Selected species. Umbilicus chloranthus, Southern Balkans ...
Umbilicus rupestris Umbilicus rupestris is a succulent, perennial flowering plant in the stonecrop
family Crassulaceae, in the genus Umbilicus. ...
tendinous inscriptions
Tendinous intersection The Rectus abdominis is crossed by fibrous bands, three in number, which are
named the tendinous inscriptions (or tendinous intersections); one is usually ...
Rectus abdominis muscle The Rectus is crossed by fibrous bands, three in number, which are named the
tendinous inscriptions. If well-defined, the rectus abdominis is colloquially ...
Sternohyoid muscle Doubling; accessory slips (Cleidohyoideus); absence. It sometimes presents,
immediately above its origin, a transverse tendinous inscription. ...
--- 9/19/07 Lecture 10 Muscular System 2
thenar eminence
Thenar eminence The thenar eminence is the body of muscle on the palm of the human hand just beneath
... A good way to remember what muscles are in the thenar eminence is ...
Hypothenar eminence Hypothenar eminence. The mucous sheaths of the tendons on the front of the wrist
... thenar and hypothenar muscles (deep) · thenar and hypothenar muscles ...
Thenar eminence A good way to remember what muscles are in the thenar eminence is - "OAF"; oafs
have big thenar eminences. 'O' = opponens, 'A' = abductor, 'F' = flexor. ...
inferior oblique
Inferior oblique muscle The Obliquus oculi inferior (inferior oblique) is a thin, narrow muscle, placed
near the anterior margin of the floor of the orbit. ...
Extraocular muscles The last muscle is the inferior oblique, which originates at the lower front of
the nasal orbital wall, and passes under the LR to insert on the lateral, ...
Inferior branch of oculomotor nerve The third and longest runs forward between the inferior recti and lateralis to
the inferior oblique. From the last a short thick branch is given off to the ...
transversus
Transversus abdominis muscle The transversus abdominis muscle, also known as the transversalis muscle and
transverse abdominal muscle, is a muscle layer of the anterior and lateral ...
Transversus thoracis muscle The lowest fibers of this muscle are horizontal in their direction, and are
continuous with those of the Transversus abdominis; the intermediate fibers are ...
Transversus perinei superficialis muscle - Wikipedia, the free ... The Transversus perinei superficialis (Transversus perinei; Superficial transverse
perineal muscle) is a narrow muscular slip, which passes more or less ...
linea alba
Linea alba The linea alba is a fibrous structure that runs down the midline of the abdomen
in humans and other vertebrates. The name means white line and the linea ...
Human abdomen The lower two-thirds of it insert, in common with fibers of the external oblique
and the underlying transversus abdominis, into the linea alba. ...
Abdominal muscles (cat) Insertion, linea alba, Action, compressor of the abdomen. ... Its fibers are
extremely longitudinal, on each side of the linea alba. ...
tendinous inscriptions
Tendinous intersection The Rectus abdominis is crossed by fibrous bands, three in number, which are
named the tendinous inscriptions (or tendinous intersections); one is usually ...
Rectus abdominis muscle The Rectus is crossed by fibrous bands, three in number, which are named the
tendinous inscriptions. If well-defined, the rectus abdominis is colloquially ...
Sternohyoid muscle Doubling; accessory slips (Cleidohyoideus); absence. It sometimes presents,
immediately above its origin, a transverse tendinous inscription. ...
aponeurosis
Aponeurosis The primary regions with thick aponeurosis is in the ventral abdominal region,
the dorsal lumbar region, and in the palmar region. ...
Palmar aponeurosis The palmar aponeurosis (palmar fascia) invests the muscles of the palm, and
consists of central, lateral, and medial portions. ...
Bicipital aponeurosis The bicipital aponeurosis (also known as lacertus fibrosus) is a broad aponeurosis
of the biceps brachii which is located in the cubital fossa of the elbow ...
anterior iliac spine
Anterior superior iliac spine The anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) is an important landmark of surface
anatomy. It refers to the anterior extremity of the iliac crest of the pelvis, ...
Iliac crest About 5 cm behind the anterior superior iliac spine there is a prominent tubercle
on the outer lip. To the external lip are attached the Tensor fasciæ latæ, ...
Anterior inferior iliac spine Below the Sartorius notch of the anterior border of the ala of the ilium is the
anterior inferior iliac spine, which ends in the upper lip of the acetabulum ...
inguinal ligament
Inguinal ligament The inguinal ligament is a band running from the pubic tubercle to the anterior
superior iliac spine. Its anatomy is very important for operating on hernia ...
Reflected inguinal ligament The reflected inguinal ligament (triangular fascia) is a layer of tendinous fibers
of a triangular shape, formed by an expansion from the lacunar ligament ...
Reflex inguinal ligament The Reflex inguinal ligament is a triangular fibrous band that arises from the
lacunar ligament and the pubic bone and passes diagonally upward and medially ...
pubic tubercle
Pubic tubercle The pubic tubercle (also known as the pubic spine) is a prominent forward-projecting
tubercle on the upper border of the medial portion of the superior ...
Superior pubic ramus The upper border presents a prominent tubercle, the pubic tubercle (pubic spine),
which projects forward; the inferior crus of the subcutaneous inguinal ...
Aponeurosis of the Obliquus externus abdominis - Wikipedia, the ... That portion of the aponeurosis which extends between the anterior superior iliac
spine and the pubic tubercle is a thick band, folded inward, ...
inguinal canal
Inguinal canal The inguinal canal is a passage in the anterior (toward the front of the body)
abdominal wall which in men conveys the spermatic cord and in women the round ...
Inguinal hernia Inguinal hernias are protrusions of abdominal cavity contents through the inguinal
canal. They are very common and their repair is one of the most ...
Indirect inguinal hernia The testicle remains connected to its blood vessels and the vas deferens, which
make up the spermatic cord and descend through the inguinal canal to the ...
vas deferens
Vas deferens During ejaculation the smooth muscle in the walls of the ductus deferens or vas
deferens contracts reflexively, thus propelling the sperm forward. ...
Congenital absence of the vas deferens - Wikipedia, the free ... Congenital absence of the vas deferens (CAVD) is a condition in which the two
vas deferens, male reproductive organs, fail to form properly prior to birth. ...
Image:Vas deferens.JPG-en.html Image:Vas deferens.JPG-en.html. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to:
navigation, search. No file by this name exists; you can upload it. ...
copulation
Mating In biology, mating is the pairing of opposite-sex or hermaphroditic internal
fertilization animals for copulation and, in social animals, also to raise ...
Russian copulation In cryptography, Russian copulation is a method of rearranging plaintext before
encryption so as to conceal stereotyped headers, salutations, introductions, ...
Copulation Of The Virtuous And Vicious - Wikipedia, the free ... Copulation of the Virtuous and Vicious. Copulation of the Virtuous and Vicious
... Copulation of the Virtuous and Vicious is Rottrevore's first EP(7"). ...
testis (es)
English plural crisis, crises, /?k?a??si?z/. testis, testes, /?t?s?ti?z/ ... a final -us that
take an -i in plural form can also, in modern usage, take an -es instead. ...
Stem cell niche 2.1 Drosophila germarium; 2.2 ES Cell niche; 2.3 Vertebrate Adult stem cell niches:
... The main niche in drosophila testis is the hub cell. ...
Differences between Malay and Indonesian - Wikipedia, the free ... refrigerator, peti sejuk, lemari es, lemari pendingin, kulkas - from Dutch koelkast
... testicles, buah zakar, testis, buah zakar, kanjut (slang, vulgar) ...
inguinal hernia
Inguinal hernia There are two types of inguinal hernia, direct and indirect. Direct inguinal
hernias occur when abdominal contents herniate through a weak point in the ...
Hernia Inguinal hernias are further divided into the more common indirect inguinal
hernia (2/3, depicted here), in which the inguinal canal is entered via a ...
Indirect inguinal hernia The most common groin hernia, the indirect inguinal hernia is a type of inguinal
hernia which protrudes through the inguinal ring and is ultimately the ...
external genitalia
Sex organ Thereafter, the development of the internal reproductive organs and the external
genitalia is determined by hormones produced by certain fetal gonads ...
Sex assignment However, the usual act of assignment carries with it some conscious and unconscious
assumptions, namely that the external genitalia reflect other aspects of ...
Labioscrotal folds The labioscrotal folds (or labioscrotal swellings, or genital swellings) are paired
... HSC - Gonad Descent and Development of External Genitalia II ...
defecating
Defecation Defecation is the act or process by which organisms eliminate solid or semisolid
waste material (feces) from the digestive tract via the anus. ...
Housebreaking If the puppy is caught in the process of urinating or defecating indoors, ...
Formerly housebroken dogs may develop problems with defecating indoors due to ...
Caganer The caganer is not the only defecating character in the Catalan Christmas ...
Other mentions of feces and defecation are common in Catalan folklore, indeed, ...
levator ani
Levator ani The Levator ani arises, in front, from the posterior surface of the superior
ramus of the pubis lateral to the symphysis; behind, from the inner surface of ...
Levator ani The Levator ani arises, in front, from the posterior surface of the superior
ramus of the pubis lateral to the symphysis; behind, from the inner surface of ...
Iliococcygeus muscle Iliococcygeus muscle. Left Levator ani from within. Latin, musculus iliococcygeus
... It is part of the levator ani group of muscles. ...
median raphe
Median raphe nucleus The median raphe nucleus (or superior central nucleus) is composed of polygonal,
fusiform and pyriform neurons and exists rostral to the nucleus raphe ...
User:Alteripse/workshop3 A similar median raphe can usually be seen from the posterior junction of the
labia to the anus. Internal anatomy, especially the presence or absence of ...
Palatine raphe The palatine raphe (or median raphe) is a raphe running across the palate, from
the palatine uvula to the incisive papilla. ...
superficial transversus
Superficial transverse metacarpal ligament - Wikipedia, the free ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Superficial
transverse ligament of the fingers. (Discuss) ...
Superficial transverse ligament of the fingers - Wikipedia, the ... The Superficial Transverse Ligament of the Fingers (or superficial transverse
metacarpal ligament) is a thin band of transverse fasciculi; it stretches ...
List of subjects in Gray's Anatomy: IV. Myology - Wikipedia, the ... Transversus perinæi superficialis (Transversus perinæi; Superficial transverse
perineal muscle); Bulbocavernosus (Sphincter vaginæ) ...
perineal body
Perineal body The perineal body is a fibrous point in the middle line of the perineum. It is
found in both males and females, and it is between the vagina and anus, ...
Perineum The following areas are thus classified as parts of the perineal region: ...
Anatomy of the Human Body. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1918; Bartleby.com, ...
Perineal membrane The perineal membrane is triangular in shape. It attaches to both ischiopubic
rami of the pelvis. It also attaches to the perineal body. ...
vagina
Vagina dentata Vagina dentata is Latin for toothed vagina. The tale is frequently told as a
cautionary tale warning of the dangers of sex with strange women. ...
The Vagina Monologues The Vagina Monologues is an Obie Award-winning episodic play written by Eve Ensler
which ran at the off-Broadway Westside Theatre after a limited run at ...
Vagina The vagina, (from Latin, literally "sheath" or "scabbard" ) is the tubular tract
leading from the uterus to the exterior of the body in female placental ...
urethra
Urethra In anatomy, the urethra is a tube which connects the urinary bladder to the
outside of the body. The urethra has an excretory function in both genders to ...
Perineal urethra A perineal urethra is a human urethral opening that is located on the perineum
rather than at the tip of the phallus. Urethral position is an aspect of ...
The Urethra Chronicles The Urethra Chronicles (2000) was released by the band Blink-182 on May 2, 2000.
A later sequel was released in 2002; The Urethra Chronicles II: Harder ...
feces
Feces Feces, faeces, or fæces (see spelling differences) is a waste product from an
animal's digestive tract expelled through the anus (or cloaca) during ...
Human feces Human feces (also faeces ? see spelling differences), also known as stools, vary
significantly in appearance, depending on the state of the whole digestive ...
Defecation Defecation is the act or process by which organisms eliminate solid or semisolid
waste material (feces) from the digestive tract via the anus. ...
--- 9/21/07 Lecture 11 Muscular System 3
iliotibial band
Iliotibial band syndrome Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS or ITBFS, for Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome)
is a common thigh injury generally associated with running. ...
Iliotibial tract The iliotibial tract (iliotibial band) is a downward continuation of the ...
The part of the iliotibial band which lies beneath the Tensor fasciæ latæ is ...
Fascia lata This band is continued downward, under the name of the iliotibial band ...
The part of the iliotibial band which lies beneath the Tensor fasciæ latæ is ...
fascia lata
Fascia lata The deep fascia of the thigh is named, from its great extent, the fascia lata;
it constitutes an investment for the whole of this region of the limb, ...
Tensor fasciae latae The Tensor fasciæ latæ is a tensor of the fascia lata; continuing its action,
the oblique direction of its fibers enables it to abduct the thigh and to ...
Anterior cutaneous branches of the femoral nerve - Wikipedia, the ... The intermediate cutaneous nerve (middle cutaneous nerve) pierces the fascia
lata (and generally the Sartorius) about 7.5 cm. below the inguinal ligament, ...
sartorius
Sartorius muscle The sartorius muscle is a long thin muscle that runs down the length of the thigh.
It is the longest muscle in the human body. Its upper portion forms the ...
Sartorius Sartorius is the Latin word for tailor. In history, many people whose name
meant 'tailor' in their own language adopted the surname Sartorius because it had ...
Sartorius (Yu-Gi-Oh! GX) Sartorius, known as Takuma Saiou (????, Sai? Takuma?) in the original Japanese
language version, is a fictional character in the Yu-Gi-Oh! ...
rectus femoris
Rectus femoris muscle The Rectus femoris muscle is one of the four quadriceps muscles of the human body.
(The others are the vastus medialis, the vastus intermedius (deep to the ...
Quadriceps femoris muscle (Rectus femoris removed to reveal the vastus intermedius. ... Rectus femoris
occupies the middle of the thigh, covering most of the other three quadriceps ...
Antagonist (muscle) The Rectus Femoris biarticular muscle acting over the hip, when compared to the
... This means that contraction from both rectus femoris and hamstrings will ...
vastus lateralis
Vastus lateralis muscle The Vastus lateralis (Vastus externus) is the largest part of the Quadriceps
femoris. It arises by a broad aponeurosis, which is attached to the upper part ...
Vastus intermedius muscle The Vastus intermedius (Crureus) arises from the front and lateral surfaces of
the body of the femur in its upper two-thirds and from the lower part of the ...
Vastus medialis Vastus medialis has been widely reported to be responsible for extending the ...
vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius, vastus medialis) - articularis genu ...
vastus intermedius
Vastus intermedius muscle The Vastus intermedius (Crureus) arises from the front and lateral surfaces of
the body of the femur in its upper two-thirds and from the lower part of the ...
Vastus medialis The Vastus medialis and Vastus intermedius appear to be inseparably united, but
when the Rectus femoris has been reflected a narrow interval will be ...
Vastus lateralis muscle The Vastus lateralis (Vastus externus) is the largest part of the Quadriceps
femoris. It arises by a broad aponeurosis, which is attached to the upper part ...
vastus medialis
Vastus medialis Vastus medialis has been widely reported to be responsible for extending the leg
the last 10%, however this commonly held claim has no basis, indeed there ...
Vastus intermedius muscle The Vastus medialis and Vastus intermedius appear to be inseparably united, but
when the Rectus femoris has been reflected a narrow interval will be ...
Femoral nerve The branch to the Vastus medialis descends lateral to the femoral vessels ...
Another, derived from the nerve to the Vastus medialis, can usually be traced ...
quadriceps tendon
Quadriceps tendon In human anatomy, the quadriceps tendon connects the quadriceps femoris muscles
to the superior aspects of the patella on the anterior of the thigh. ...
Quadriceps femoris muscle All four parts of the quadriceps muscle attach to the patella via the quadriceps
tendon. The quadriceps is also involved in Lombard's Paradox. ...
Rectus femoris muscle All four combine to form the quadriceps tendon, which inserts into the patella
and continues as the patellar ligament.) The Rectus femoris is situated in ...
patellar ligament
Patellar ligament The Patellar ligament (anterior ligament) is the central portion of the common
tendon of the Quadriceps femoris, which is continued from the patella to the ...
Muscular system of the horse Inserts into the medial femorotibial ligament, medial side of he tibia, and medial
side of the patellar ligament. Adducts the limb. ...
Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction - Wikipedia, the free ... A patellar tendon graft was used. Discoloration of the left leg is from swelling
that drained from the knee to the shin. Anterior cruciate ligament ...
tibial tuberosity
Tibial tuperosity advancement procedure - Wikipedia, the free ... Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA) is an orthopedic procedure to repair deficient
cranial cruciate ligaments in dogs. It has also been used in cats. ...
Tuberosity of the tibia Narrow below where the anterior surfaces of the condyles of the tibia end in a
large oblong elevation, the tuberosity of the tibia, which gives attachment ...
Tibia The tibia or shin bone, in human anatomy, is found medial (towards the middle)
... condyle - intercondyloid eminence - tuberosity of the tibia - posterior ...
femoral triangle
Femoral triangle Since the femoral triangle provides easy access to a major artery, coronary
angioplasty is often performed by entering the femoral artery at the femoral ...
Femoral canal The femoral canal is conical and measures about 1.25 cm. in length. The entrance
to the femoral canal is the femoral ring, through which bowel can sometimes ...
Femoral triangle Since the femoral triangle provides easy access to a major artery, coronary
angioplasty is often performed by entering the femoral artery at the femoral ...
adductor magnus
Adductor magnus muscle The function of the adductor magnus is to serve as a powerful extensor of the
thigh, along with being able to flex and laterally rotate the thigh. ...
Muscles of the hip The adductor brevis, adductor longus, adductor magnus, pectineus, and gracilis
make up the adductor group. The adductors all orginate on the pubis and ...
Adductor brevis muscle The adductor brevis is a muscle in the thigh situated immediately behind the
pectineus ... pectineus - adductor brevis - adductor longus - adductor magnus ...
hamstrings
Hamstring In human anatomy, a hamstring refers to one of the tendons that makes up the
borders of the space behind the knee. In modern anatomical contexts, however, ...
Weight training exercises 1.1 Quadriceps (front of legs); 1.2 Hamstrings (back of legs); 1.3 Calves.
2 Upper body ... This is an isolation exercise for the hamstrings. ...
Hamstring In human anatomy, a hamstring refers to one of the tendons that makes up the
borders of the space behind the knee. In modern anatomical contexts, however, ...
biceps femoris
Biceps femoris muscle The biceps femoris is a muscle of the posterior thigh. As its name implies, it
has two parts, one of which (the long head) forms part of the hamstrings ...
Biceps femoris tendon avulsion The biceps femoris is commonly injured in sports that require explosive bending
of the knee as seen in sprinting. If the athlete is fatigued or has not ...
Hamstring The short head of the biceps femoris, with its divergent origin and ... The long
head of the biceps femoris extends the hip as when beginning to walk; ...
semimembranosus
Semimembranosus muscle The semimembranosus, so called from its membranous tendon of origin, is situated
at the back and medial side of the thigh. ...
Bursa of the knee joint ... and the tendon of the Semimembranosus and often communicates with the joint;
... a bursa between the tendons of the Semimembranosus and Semitendinosus. ...
Hamstring Semitendinosus and semimembranosus extend the hip when the trunk is ...
posterior compartment/hamstring: biceps femoris - semitendinosus, semimembranosus ...
semitendinosus
Semitendinosus muscle The semitendinosus, remarkable for the great length of its tendon of insertion,
is situated at the posterior and medial aspect of the thigh. ...
Hamstring Semitendinosus and semimembranosus extend the hip when the trunk is ...
posterior compartment/hamstring: biceps femoris - semitendinosus, semimembranosus ...
Hamstring Semitendinosus and semimembranosus extend the hip when the trunk is ...
posterior compartment/hamstring: biceps femoris - semitendinosus, semimembranosus ...
gracilis
Gracilis muscle The Gracilis (Latin: slender) is the most superficial muscle on the medial side
of the thigh. It is thin and flattened, broad above, narrow and tapering ...
Nepenthes gracilis Nepenthes gracilis (Latin: gracilis = thin, slender) is a very common lowland
pitcher plant that is very widespread in the Sunda region. ...
Fasciculus gracilis The fasciculus gracilis (tract of Goll) is wedge-shaped on transverse section,
and lies next the posterior median septum, its base being at the surface of ...
tibialis anterior
Tibialis anterior muscle In human anatomy, the tibialis anterior is a muscle in the shin that spans the
length of the tibia. It originates in the upper two-thirds of the lateral ...
Tibialis posterior muscle As well as being a key muscle for stabilisation, the tibialis posterior muscle
also contracts to produce inversion of the foot and assists in the plantar ...
Body of tibia The lateral surface is narrower than the medial; its upper two-thirds present a
shallow groove for the origin of the Tibialis anterior; its lower third is ...
dorsiflex
Tibialis anterior muscle Its acts to dorsiflex and invert the foot. It is situated on the lateral side of
the tibia; it is thick and fleshy above, tendinous below. ...
Plantar reflex A baby's smaller toes will fan out, and their big toe will dorsiflex slowly.
This happens because the corticospinal pathways (that run from the brain down ...
Massage The other hand is placed around the heel so that the therapist's forearm can be
used to dorsiflex the foot. This is one of the techniques used by sports ...
invert
Inverse Inversion in postcolonial theory, a discursive strategy/gesture in cultural and
subaltern studies; Invert, a bmx trick; Inverted pyramid, a way to arrange ...
Inverted sugar syrup Inverted sugar syrup is sucrose-based syrup treated with the glycoside hydrolase
enzyme invertase or an acid, which splits each sucrose molecule into one ...
Inverse function From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search. A function
? and its inverse ??1. Because ? maps a to 3 ...
gastrocnemius
Gastrocnemius muscle The Gastrocnemius (pronounced /?gæs.tr?k?ni.mi.?s/) muscle is a powerful superficial
muscle that is in the back part of the lower leg (the calf). ...
Soleus muscle It is closely connected to the gastrocnemius muscle and some anatomists ...
Superficial to the soleus (closer to the skin) is the gastrocnemius muscle. ...
Achilles tendon The Achilles tendon is the tendonous extension of three muscles in the lower leg:
gastrocnemius, soleus, and plantaris. In humans, the tendon passes behind ...
soleus
Soleus muscle The soleus muscle and surrounding structures, from Gray's Anatomy. This is a view
of the back of the right leg; most of the gastrocnemius muscle has been ...
Gastrocnemius muscle The gastrocnemius is located with the soleus in the superficial posterior ...
Deep to the gastrocnemius (farther from the skin) is the soleus muscle, ...
Achilles tendon The Achilles tendon is the tendonous extension of three muscles in the lower leg:
gastrocnemius, soleus, and plantaris. In humans, the tendon passes behind ...
plantar flex
Ankle The ankle joint is responsible for dorsiflexion (moving the toes up as when
standing only on the heels) and plantar flexion of the foot (moving the toes ...
Plantarflexion Flexor muscles visible at bottom center. Plantarflexion is the movement which
increases ... The word "Plantar" translates as "toward the sole" ("Planta"). ...
Flexor hallucis brevis muscle The Flexor hallucis brevis arises, by a pointed tendinous process, ... plantar third
layer - flexor hallucis brevis - adductor hallucis - flexor digiti ...
gastrointestinal tract
Gastrointestinal tract The gastrointestinal tract (GI tract), also called the digestive tract, or the
alimentary canal, is the system of organs within multicellular animals that ...
Image:Digestive system diagram.svg The gastrointestinal tract, also called the digestive tract, alimentary canal,
or gut, is the system of organs within multicellular animals that takes in ...
Digestion Fiber helps to keep the food moving through the G.I. tract. The food that cannot
be broken down is called feces. Feces are stored in the rectum until they ...
peristalsis
Peristalsis Peristalsis is the rhythmic contraction of smooth muscles to propel contents
through the digestive tract. The word is derived from New Latin and comes from ...
Peristalsis Peristalsis is the rhythmic contraction of smooth muscles to propel contents
through the digestive tract. The word is derived from New Latin and comes from ...
Retroperistalsis Retroperistalsis is the reverse of the involuntary smooth muscle contractions of
peristalsis. It usually occurs as a precursor to vomiting. ...
intercolated disc
Did you mean intercalated disc?
--- 9/24/07 Lecture 12 Hematology 1
sarcolemma
Sarcolemma This means that the sarcolemma is not attached to the cytoskeleton. Therefore during
muscle contraction, the sarcolemma is not synchronized with the ...
Smooth muscle Actin filaments attach to the sarcolemma by focal adhesions or attachment ...
The sarcolemma possess microdomains specialized to cell signalling events and ...
Musculoskeletal system These neurotransmitters diffuse across the synapse and bind to specific receptor
sites on the sarcolemma (cell membrane of the muscle fiber). ...
sarcoplasm
Sarcoplasm The Sarcoplasm of a muscle fiber is comparable to the cytoplasm of other cells,
but it houses unusually large amounts of glycosomes (granules of stored ...
Systole (medicine) At this point, voltage-gated calcium channels on the cell membrane open and allow
calcium ions to pass through, into the sarcoplasm, or interior, ...
Energy systems This all occurs in the sarcoplasm of muscle cells and is said to be anaerobic as
oxygen is not required for it to work. When the intensity of exercise drops ...
myofibrils
Myofibril Myofibrils (obsolete term: sarcostyles) are cylindrical organelles, found within
muscle cells. They are bundles of actomyosin filaments that run from one ...
Muscle hypertrophy The additional contractile proteins appear to be incorporated into existing
myofibrils (the chains of sarcomeres within a muscle cell). ...
Muscle Within the cells are myofibrils; myofibrils contain sarcomeres, which are composed
of actin and myosin. Individual muscle fibres are surrounded by ...
myofilaments
Myofilament The filaments of myofibrils constructed from proteins, myofilaments, consist of
2 types ... sarcomere (a, i, and h bands; z and m lines), myofilaments (thin ...
Troponin ... them to form a troponin-tropomyosin complex; Troponin I binds to actin in thin
myofilaments to hold the troponin-tropomyosin complex in place ...
Troponin I It binds to actin in thin myofilaments to hold the troponin-tropomyosin complex
in place. The letter I is given due to its inhibitory character. ...
myosin
Myosin Part of the myosin structure, atoms in the heavy chain are colored red on the
left-hand side, and atoms in the light chains are colored orange and yellow. ...
Myosin light-chain kinase This binding will activate the MLCK which will go on to phosphorylate the myosin
light chain. This will enable the myosin crossbridge to bind to the actin ...
Sliding filament model Myosin is a molecular motor that acts like an active ratchet. Chains of actin
proteins form high tensile passive 'thin' filaments that transmit the force ...
actin
Actin Actin is a globular structural, 42-47 kDa protein found in many eukaryotic cells,
with concentrations of over 100 ?M. It is also one of the most highly ...
Actin-binding protein 1 A Actin-Binding Proteins (and Drugs); 2 B Actin-Binding Proteins ....
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actin-binding_protein" ...
Microfilament Actoclampins are the actin filament (+)-end-tracking molecular motors that generate
... The term actoclampin is generic and applies to all actin filament ...
sarcomere
Sarcomere A sarcomere is the basic unit of a muscle's cross-striated myofibril. Sarcomeres are
multi-protein complexes composed of three different filament systems. ...
Muscular system The smallest cross section of skeletal muscle is called a sarcomere which is the
functional unit within the cell. It extends from one Z line to the next ...
Desmin Desmin forms a scaffold around the Z-disk of the sarcomere and connects the Z-disk to
... [2] Through its connection to the sarcomere Desmin connects the ...
sarcoplasmic reticulum
Endoplasmic reticulum The sarcoplasmic reticulum is a special type of smooth ER found in smooth and
striated muscle. The only structural difference between this organelle and the ...
Muscle contraction Activated voltage-gated calcium channels physically interact with calcium-release
channels to activate them, causing the sarcoplasmic reticulum to release ...
Calsequestrin Calsequestrin is a calcium-binding protein of the sarcoplasmic reticulum.
The protein helps hold calcium in the sarcoplasmic reticulum after a muscle ...
hematology
Hematology Wikipedia article describing branch of medicine, related diseases, tests, and
treatments.
Category:Hematology The main article for this category is Hematology. (previous 200) (next 200) ...
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Hematology" ...
Hematological malignancy Although hematological malignancies are a form of cancer, they are generally
treated by specialists in hematology, although in many hospitals oncology ...
plasma
Plasma Blood plasma, the yellow-colored liquid component of blood, in which blood cells
are suspended; Plasma (physics), an ionized gas where the electrons in the ...
Plasma (physics) In physics and chemistry, a plasma is typically an ionized gas. Plasma is considered
to be a distinct state of matter, apart from gases, because of its ...
Blood plasma Blood plasma is the liquid component of blood, in which the blood cells are
suspended. It makes up about 55% of total blood volume. Blood plasma is prepared ...
corpuscles
Corpuscle Corpuscle is an archaic term that has several meanings: ... "On the Number of
Corpuscles in an Atom". Philosophical Magazine. a single, ...
Pacinian corpuscle Pacinian corpuscles are one of the four major types of mechanoreceptor, responsible
for sensitivity to deep pressure touch and high frequency vibration. ...
Meissner's corpuscle Meissner's corpuscles are encapsulated unmyelinated nerve endings, which consist
of flattened supportive cells arranged as horizontal lamellae surrounded by ...
cell fragments
Central dogma of molecular biology These cell fragments could express proteins from foreign DNA templates, and
neomycin was found to enhance this effect. [3] ...
Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia The result is red cell fragmentation and intravascular hemolysis. ... programmed to
flag blood films that display red blood cell fragments or schistocytes. ...
Differential centrifugation Whereas smaller cell fragments and organelles require more force and greater
times to pellet. In general, one can enrich for whole cells, nuclei, ...
formed elements
Well-formed element In web page design, and generally for all markup languages such as SGML, HTML,
and XML, a well-formed element is one that is either: ...
Nucleosynthesis (Elements formed during this time were in the plasma state, and did not cool to
the state of neutral atoms until much later). ...
Well-formed For example, it can be the way in which an HTML tag, or more commonly an XML
element, may be used; see well-formed element. ...
buffers
Buffer solution For an individual weak acid or weak base component, see Buffering agent. For uses
not related to acid-base chemistry, see Buffer (disambiguation). ...
Buffer Mineral redox buffer, a mineral assemblage which stabilises oxidation state in
natural rock systems. In electronics and computer science: ...
Buffer (computer science) In computing, a buffer is a region of memory used to temporarily hold data while
it is being moved from one place to another. Typically, the data is stored ...
enzymes
Enzyme Ribbon diagram of the enzyme TIM, surrounded by the space-filling model of the
protein. TIM is an extremely efficient enzyme involved in the process that ...
Category:Enzymes Enzymes appear in subcategories according to the EC number classification: ...
For a list of enzymes currently sorted in this category, see List of enzymes ...
Restriction enzyme A restriction enzyme (or restriction endonuclease) is an enzyme that cuts
double-stranded DNA. The enzyme makes two incisions, one through each of the ...
erythropoiesis
Erythropoiesis Erythropoiesis is the process by which red blood cells (erythrocytes) are produced.
In human adults, this usually occurs within the bone marrow. ...
Darbepoetin alfa It stimulates erythropoiesis (increases red blood cell levels) and is used to
treat anemia, ... It is an erythropoiesis stimulating 165-amino acid protein. ...
Erythropoietin FDA Public Health Advisory: Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents (ESAs): ...
Information for Healthcare Professionals: Erythropoiesis Stimulating Agents (ESA). ...
normoblast
Normoblast The term normoblast is sometimes used as a synonym for erythroblast, but at other
times it is considered a subcategory. In the latter context, there are two ...
Erythropoiesis ... basophilic normoblast/early normoblast; polychromatophilic normoblast/intermediate
normoblast; orthochromatic normoblast/late normoblast; reticulocyte ...
User:TenOfAllTrades/temp2 Normoblast stages. Pronormoblast. Basophilic normoblast. Polychromatic normoblast.
Orthochromatic normoblast. ?. Reticulocyte. ?. Erythrocyte ...
leukocytes
White blood cell In addition to the irregularly shaped leukocytes, both red blood cells and many
... White blood cells or leukocytes are cells of the immune system which ...
Category:Leukocytes Pages in category "Leukocytes". There are 15 pages in this section of this category.
... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Leukocytes" ...
Leukocyte extravasation Leukocyte extravasation refers to the movement of leukocytes from the circulatory
system into the interstitial fluid, towards the site of tissue damage or ...
platelets
Platelet Platelets or thrombocytes are the cell fragments circulating in the blood that
are involved in the cellular mechanisms of primary hemostasis leading to the ...
Thrombocytopenia The number of platelets in a blood sample also decreases rather quickly with time
and a low ... If the cause for the low platelet count remains unclear, ...
Plateletpheresis Platelet count increase as well as platelet survival after transfusion is ...
Because platelets have a life-span of just 5 days, more platelet donors are ...
thrombocytes
Platelet Platelets or thrombocytes are the cell fragments circulating in the blood that
are involved in the cellular mechanisms of primary hemostasis leading to the ...
Plasmodium ... pigmented forms may be found in the leukocytes occasionally. Fallisia produce
non pigmented asexual and gametocyte forms in leukocytes and thrombocytes. ...
User:Ghenzmitz Platelets ? thrombocytes a. Responsible in blood clotting. Blood Types:- discovered
by Karl Landsteiner and Co-workers (1900-1902) ?A? ?B? ?AB? ?O? ...
hematocrit
Hematocrit The hematocrit (Ht or HCT) and packed cell volume (PCV) are measures of the
proportion of blood volume that is occupied by red blood cells. ...
Polycythemia vera Common findings include an elevated hemoglobin level or hematocrit, reflecting
the increased number of red blood cells; the platelet count or white blood ...
Bjarne Riis The 60% is an allusion to a high hematocrit (red blood cell) level, an indication
of EPO usage. It has been published, but never proven, that Riis had a ...
microcytic anemia
Microcytic anemia Microcytic anemia is characterized by small red blood cells. The normal mean
corpuscular volume (abbreviated to MCV on full blood count results) is 76-100 ...
Anemia Microcytic anemia is primarily a result of hemoglobin synthesis ... A mnemonic
commonly used to remember causes of microcytic anemia is TAILS: T ...
Iron deficiency anemia Microcytic anemia can also be the result of malabsorption phenomena associated
with gluten-sensitive enteropathy/coeliac disease. ...
hypochromic anemia
Hypochromic anemia Hypochromic anemia is a form of anemia characterized by a disproportionate
reduction of red cell hemoglobin in proportion to the volume of the erythrocyte ...
Thalassemia Two ? loci permit nearly normal erythropoiesis, but there is a mild microcytic
hypochromic anemia. The disease in this form can be mistaken for iron ...
Microcytic anemia In microcytic anemia, the red blood cells (erythrocytes) are usually also
hypochromic, meaning that the red blood cells are paler than usual. ...
albumin
Albumin Albumin (Latin: albus, white) refers generally to any protein with water solubility,
which is moderately soluble in concentrated salt solutions, ...
Serum albumin Serum albumin, often referred to simply as albumin, is the most abundant plasma
protein in humans and other mammals. Albumin is essential for maintaining ...
Human serum albumin Human serum albumin is the most abundant protein in human blood plasma. It is
produced in the liver. Albumin comprises about half of the blood serum protein ...
fibrinogen
Fibrin Fibrin is made from its zymogen fibrinogen, a soluble plasma glycoprotein that
is synthesised by the liver. Processes in the coagulation cascade activate ...
Fibrin Fibrin is made from its zymogen fibrinogen, a soluble plasma glycoprotein that
is synthesised by the liver. Processes in the coagulation cascade activate ...
Disseminated intravascular coagulation - Wikipedia, the free ... The fibrinolytic system then functions to break down fibrinogen and fibrin. ...
DIC results in lower fibrinogen (as it has all been converted to fibrin), ...
globulin
Globulin Globulin is one of the two types of serum proteins, the other being albumin.
This generic term encompasses a heterogeneous series of families of proteins, ...
Gamma globulin Gamma globulins, or Ig's, are a class of proteins in the blood, identified by
their position after serum protein electrophoresis. The most significant gamma ...
Thyroxine-binding globulin Thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) is one of three proteins (along with transthyretin
and albumin) responsible for carrying the thyroid hormones thyroxine ...
plasma cells
Plasma cell Plasma cells (also called plasma B cells or plasmocytes) are cells of the immune
system that secrete large amounts of antibodies. They differentiate from B ...
Multiple myeloma Multiple myeloma (also known as MM, myeloma, plasma cell myeloma, .... Clonal plasma
cells >10% on bone marrow biopsy or (in any quantity) in a biopsy from ...
B cell Plasma B cells (also known as plasma cells) are large B cells that have been
exposed to antigen and are producing and secreting large amounts of antibodies, ...
antibodies
Antibody Antibodies are Y-shaped proteins that are found in blood or other bodily fluids
of vertebrates, and are used by the immune system to identify and neutralize ...
Monoclonal antibodies Monoclonal antibodies (mAb or moAb) are antibodies that are identical because
they were produced by one type of immune cell and are all clones of a single ...
Polyclonal antibody Polyclonal antibodies are antibodies that are derived from different B-cell lines.
They are a mixture of immunoglobulin molecules secreted against a ...
blood proteins
Blood proteins Blood proteins, also called serum proteins, are proteins found in blood plasma.
They serve many different functions including circulatory transport ...
Category:Blood proteins Pages in category "Blood proteins". There are 11 pages in this section of this
category. B. Barbourin · Blood proteins. C. Cholesterylester transfer protein ...
Blood plasma Blood plasma contains many vital proteins including fibrinogen (a clotting ...
It is mainly composed of water, blood proteins, and inorganic electrolytes. ...
multipotential stem cells
User:Aeternalis/Charles Leblond The existence of stem cells in adult organs, as shown by autoradiography with
.... with the idea that most cells are multipotential in their functions. ...
erythrocytes
Red blood cell Red blood cells are also known as RBCs, haematids, or erythrocytes (from Greek
... The diameter of a typical human erythrocyte disk is 6?8 µm, much smaller ...
Complement receptor 1 The number of CR1 molecules decreases with aging of erythrocytes in normal ...
The mean number of complement receptor 1 (CR1) molecules on erythrocytes in ...
CD36 CD36 is found on platelets, erythrocytes, monocytes, differentiated adipocytes,
mammary epithelial cells, spleen cells and some skin microdermal endothelial ...
testosterone
Testosterone Testosterone is a steroid hormone from the androgen group. Testosterone is
primarily secreted in the testes of males and the ovaries of females although ...
Testosterone poisoning Testosterone poisoning is a pejorative neologism that refers not to actual
poisoning, but to stereotypical aspects of male behavior. ...
Pud Galvin In 1889, over 100 years before the current steroid controversy in Major League
Baseball, he was known to have injected monkey testosterone before pitching. ...
reticulocyte
Reticulocyte Reticulocytes are immature red blood cells, typically composing about 1% of the
red cells in the human body. Reticulocytes develop and mature in the red ...
Reticulocyte index The Reticulocyte production index (RPI, also called a corrected reticulocyte
count) is a calculated value used in the diagnosis of anemia. ...
Reticulocyte Reticulocytes are immature red blood cells, typically composing about 1% of the
red cells in the human body. Reticulocytes develop and mature in the red ...
reticulum
Reticulum For the second stomach of a ruminant animal, see Reticulum (anatomy). For the
organelle of the cell, see the Endoplasmic reticulum article. ...
Endoplasmic reticulum The endoplasmic reticulum or ER is an organelle found in all eukaryotic cells
that is an interconnected network of tubules, vesicles and cisternae that is ...
Reticulum (anatomy) For the constellation see reticulum. For the organelle of the cell, endoplasmic
reticulum. The reticulum is the second chamber in the alimentary canal of a ...
--- 9/26/07 Lecture 13 Hematology 2
normoblast
Normoblast The term normoblast is sometimes used as a synonym for erythroblast, but at other
times it is considered a subcategory. In the latter context, there are two ...
Erythropoiesis ... basophilic normoblast/early normoblast; polychromatophilic normoblast/intermediate
normoblast; orthochromatic normoblast/late normoblast; reticulocyte ...
User:TenOfAllTrades/temp2 Normoblast stages. Pronormoblast. Basophilic normoblast. Polychromatic normoblast.
Orthochromatic normoblast. ?. Reticulocyte. ?. Erythrocyte ...
reticulocyte
Reticulocyte Reticulocytes are immature red blood cells, typically composing about 1% of the
red cells in the human body. Reticulocytes develop and mature in the red ...
Reticulocyte index The Reticulocyte production index (RPI, also called a corrected reticulocyte
count) is a calculated value used in the diagnosis of anemia. ...
Reticulocyte Reticulocytes are immature red blood cells, typically composing about 1% of the
red cells in the human body. Reticulocytes develop and mature in the red ...
polycythemia
Polycythemia Polycythemia is a condition in which there is a net increase in the total number
of red blood cells in the body. The overproduction of red blood cells may ...
Polycythemia vera Primary polycythemia, often called polycythemia vera (PCV), polycythemia rubra
vera (PRV), or erythremia, occurs when excess red blood cells are produced as ...
John Martin Ping In July 2005 Mr. Ping suffered a small stroke and discovered he was suffering
from a disease called Polycythemia vera, which is an abnormal increase in ...
polymorphonuclear
Granulocyte [1] They are also called polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN or PML) because of the
... In common parlance, the term polymorphonuclear leukocyte often refers ...
Image:S1-Polymorphonuclear Cells with Conidia in Liquid Media.ogg ... Image:S1-Polymorphonuclear Cells with Conidia in Liquid Media.ogg-en.html.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search ...
PMN PMN may refer to:. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes, or granulocyte; PMN mine, an
anti-personnel mine; Panglima Mangku Negara, a Malaysian honour ...
phagocytize
Did you mean phagocytized?
Phagocytosis A great body of evidence continues to mount showing that resident, neighbouring
cells in a tissue will phagocytize their apoptotic neighbours, ...
Granulation tissue These work to phagocytize old or damaged tissue, and protect the healing tissue
from pathogenic insult. This is necessary both to aid the healing process ...
Wound healing [3] [2] In the inflammatory phase, bacteria and debris are phagocytized and .....
[26] [29] Epithelial cells have the ability to phagocytize debris such as ...
granular leukocytes
Decidua Its leukocyte population is distinct with the presence of large endometrial
granular leukocytes being predominant, while polynuclear leukocytes and B-cells ...
Lymphocyte Most, but not all large granular lymphocytes are more commonly known as the ....
Cytotoxicity · Human leukocyte antigen · Lymphoproliferative disorders ...
User:Mattopaedia/nursery The white blood cells or leukocytes take on an important role in ... They are
easily identified by their multilobed nuclei and granular cytoplasm and ...
neutrophils
Neutrophil granulocyte A blood smear showing a Neutrophil Granulocyte; the three-lobulated nucleus can
be seen. This picture has been stained with MayGrunwald Giemsa, and observed ...
Absolute neutrophil count Absolute neutrophil count (ANC) is a measure of the number of neutrophil
granulocytes (also known as polymorphonuclear cells, PMN's, polys, granulocytes, ...
Innate immune system [3] Neutrophils then trigger other parts of the immune system by releasing factors
that summon other leukocytes and lymphocytes. ...
acidophils
Anterior pituitary acidophil In the anterior pituitary, the term "acidophil" is used to describe two ...
and chromophobes) [1], and are therefore identified simply as "acidophils". ...
Eosinophil granulocyte Eosinophil granulocytes, commonly referred to as eosinophils (or less commonly
as acidophils), are white blood cells of the immune system that are ...
Eosinophil granulocyte Eosinophil granulocytes, commonly referred to as eosinophils (or less commonly
as acidophils), are white blood cells of the immune system that are ...
basophils
Basophil granulocyte Basophils are the least common of the granulocytes, representing about 0.01% to
0.3% of circulating leukocytes (white blood cells). ...
Mast cell Mast cells are very similar to basophil granulocytes (a class of white blood ...
Nevertheless, both mast cells and basophils are thought to originate from ...
Anterior pituitary basophil These basophils are further classified by the hormones they produce. (It is
usually not possible to distinguish between these cell types using standard ...
agranular leukocytes
Monoblast The cytoplasm is agranular, stains moderately to lightly basophilic, and often
has an intensely stained ... Categories: Leukocytes | Immunology stubs ...
lymphocytes
Lymphocyte A lymphocyte is a type of white blood cell in the vertebrate immune system.
By their appearance under the light microscope, there are two broad categories ...
B cell B lymphocytes are the cells of the immune system that make antibodies to invading
... B cells are lymphocytes that play a large role in the humoral immune ...
Category:Lymphocytes Jump to: navigation, search. The main article for this category is Lymphocytes.
... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Lymphocytes" ...
monocytes
Monocyte A monocyte is a leukocyte, part of the human body's immune system that protects
against blood-borne pathogens and moves quickly (aprox. ...
Arteriogenesis An increase in shear stress causes an increase in the number of monocyte ...
MCP-1 increases the tendency of monocytes to attach to the cell wall. ...
Macrophage When a monocyte enters damaged tissue through the endothelium of a blood vessel (a
... As secretory cells, monocytes and macrophages are vital to the ...
plasma cells
Plasma cell Plasma cells (also called plasma B cells or plasmocytes) are cells of the immune
system that secrete large amounts of antibodies. They differentiate from B ...
Multiple myeloma Multiple myeloma (also known as MM, myeloma, plasma cell myeloma, .... Clonal plasma
cells >10% on bone marrow biopsy or (in any quantity) in a biopsy from ...
B cell Plasma B cells (also known as plasma cells) are large B cells that have been
exposed to antigen and are producing and secreting large amounts of antibodies, ...
globulin
Globulin Globulin is one of the two types of serum proteins, the other being albumin.
This generic term encompasses a heterogeneous series of families of proteins, ...
Gamma globulin Gamma globulins, or Ig's, are a class of proteins in the blood, identified by
their position after serum protein electrophoresis. The most significant gamma ...
Thyroxine-binding globulin Thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) is one of three proteins (along with transthyretin
and albumin) responsible for carrying the thyroid hormones thyroxine ...
thymus gland
Thymus MeSH · Thymus+gland · Dorlands/Elsevier · t_10/12807749 ... In human anatomy,
the thymus is an organ located in the upper anterior portion of the chest ...
Ductless gland The pineal gland, the thymus gland, the pituitary gland, the thyroid gland, the
spleen, and the two adrenal glands are all ductless glands. ...
Thymectomy A thymectomy is an operation to remove the thymus gland. It usually results in
remission of myasthenia gravis with the help of medication including steroids ...
antigen
Antigen An antigen or immunogen is a molecule that stimulates an immune response. The word
originated from the notion that they can stimulate antibody generation. ...
Prostate specific antigen Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a protein produced by the cells of the prostate
gland. PSA is present in small quantities in the serum of normal men, ...
Duffy antigen system The Duffy antigen system is a blood system in which a pair of proteins appears
on the outside of red blood cells. It was named after the patient in which it ...
killer cells
Natural killer cell Given their strong cytolytic activity and the potential for auto-reactivity,
Natural Killer cell activity is tightly regulated. Natural Killer cells must ...
Natural Killer T cell NKT cells include both NK1.1+ and NK1.1-, as well as CD4+, CD4-, CD8+ and CD8-
cells. Natural Killer T cells share other features with NK cells as well, ...
Lymphokine-activated killer cell In cell biology, a lymphokine-activated killer cell (also known as a LAK cell)
is a white blood cell that has been stimulated to kill tumour cells. ...
suppressor cells
Regulatory T cell Regulatory T cells (also known as suppressor T cells) are a specialized ...
T-suppressor cells are a component of the immune system that suppress immune ...
T cell Through interaction with helper T cells, these cells can be transformed into
suppressor T cells which prevent autoimmune diseases such as experimental ...
T helper cell For example, there are sub-groups of suppressor T cells, natural killer T cells,
and cytotoxic T cells that are known to express CD4 (although cytotoxic ...
helper cells
T helper cell T helper cells (also known as effector T cells or Th cells) are a sub-group of
lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell or leukocyte) that plays an important ...
T cell Helper T cells are the "middlemen" of the adaptive immune system. Once activated,
they divide rapidly and secrete small proteins called cytokines that ...
White blood cell CD4+ (helper) T cells co-ordinate the immune response and are important in the
... to CD4+ and CD8+ ?? T cells and share characteristics of helper T cells, ...
chromatin
Chromatin Chromatin is the complex of DNA and protein that makes up chromosomes. In eukaryotes
chromatin is found inside the nuclei of eukaryotic cells, ...
RNA polymerase control by chromatin structure - Wikipedia, the ... This is an outline of an example mechanism of yeast cells by which chromatin
structure and histone posttranslational modification help regulate and record ...
Chromatin immunoprecipitation Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, is an method used for experiments in
molecular biology. The purpose of this assay is to determine whether ...
T4 cells
Thyroid hormone Thyroxine, T4. Thyroxine, T4. Triiodothyronine, T3. Triiodothyronine, T3.
Thyroxine (3,5,3',5'-tetraiodothyronine) is produced by follicular cells of the ...
List of AIDS-related topics T cells (T lymphocytes) - T lymphocyte proliferation assay - T lymphocytes - T
suppressor cells - T4 cell - T4 cells (T-helper cells) - T8 cells - Tanner ...
Thyroid Cells of the brain are a major target for the thyroid hormones T3 and T4.
Thyroid hormones play a particularly crucial role in brain development during ...
T8 cells
Cytotoxic T cell A cytotoxic T cell (also known as TC, CTL or killer T cell) belongs to a sub-group
of T lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) which are capable of ...
List of AIDS-related topics T cells (T lymphocytes) - T lymphocyte proliferation assay - T lymphocytes - T
suppressor cells - T4 cell - T4 cells (T-helper cells) - T8 cells - Tanner ...
Health issues and the effects of cannabis - Wikipedia, the free ... CB2 receptors are most commonly prevalent on B-cells, natural killer cells, and
monocytes, but can also be found on polymorphonuclear neurtrophil cells, T8 ...
alkaline phosphatase
Alkaline phosphatase Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (EC 3.1.3.1) is a hydrolase enzyme responsible for
removing phosphate groups from many types of molecules, including nucleotides, ...
Calf Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase (CIP) - Wikipedia, the free ... Calf Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase (CIP) is an enzyme that catalyzes the 5'
phosophate group's removal from DNA. This enzyme is frequently used in DNA ...
Levamisole Levamisole reversibly but uncompetitively inhibits (independent from presence or
absence of Mg2+) most alkaline phosphatase isoforms (eg human liver, bone, ...
Barr body
Barr body In those species (including humans) in which sex is determined by the presence
of the Y or W chromosome rather than the diploidy of the X or Z, a Barr body ...
Barr body In those species (including humans) in which sex is determined by the presence
of the Y or W chromosome rather than the diploidy of the X or Z, a Barr body ...
X-inactivation The inactive X forms a discrete body within the nucleus called a Barr body.
[3] The Barr body is generally located on the periphery of the nucleus, ...
acid phosphatase
Acid phosphatase Acid phosphatase is a phosphatase, a type of enzyme, used to free attached
phosphate groups from other molecules during digestion.It is basically a phospho ...
Prostatic acid phosphatase Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is an enzyme produced by the prostate. It may
be found in increased amounts in men who have prostate cancer or other ...
Purple acid phosphatases Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) (EC 3.1.3.2) are metalloenzymes that hydrolyse
phosphate esters and anhydrides under acidic condition. ...
pus
Pus Pus is a whitish-yellow or yellow substance produced during inflammatory responses
of the body that can be found in regions of pyogenic bacterial infections ...
El Pus El Pus were a 'Rap and Roll' group from Atlanta, United States. They formed in
the early 1990s but only released their first album, Hoodlum Rock Vol. ...
Ubi pus, ibi evacua Ubi pus, ibi evacua is a Latin aphorism or adage, often cited in medicine, that
literally means: "where there is pus, there evacuate it". ...
allergy
Allergy An allergy is an abnormal, acquired sensitivity to a given substance, including
pollen, drugs, or numerous environmental triggers. ...
Food allergy A food allergy is an immunologic response to a food protein. It is estimated that
up to 12 million Americans have food allergies of one type or another, ...
Peanut allergy Peanut allergy is a type of food allergy, distinct from nut allergies. It is a
hypersensitivity to dietary substances from peanuts causing an overreaction ...
asthma
Asthma Asthma is a chronic illness involving the respiratory system in which the airway
occasionally constricts, becomes inflamed, and is lined with excessive ...
Yokkaichi Asthma Yokkaichi Asthma occurred in the city of Yokkaichi in Mie Prefecture, Japan in
the 1960s. The burning of petroleum and crude oil released large quantities ...
Category:Asthma Pages in category "Asthma". There are 25 pages in this section of this category.
... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Asthma" ...
histaminase
heparin
Heparin Heparin, a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan is widely used as an injectable
anticoagulant and has the highest negative charge density of any known ...
Low molecular weight heparin In medicine, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is a class of medication used
as an anticoagulant in diseases that feature thrombosis, as well as for ...
Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) with or without thrombosis (HITT) is
thrombocytopenia (low platelet counts) due to the administration of heparin. ...
histamine
Histamine Histamine is a biogenic amine involved in local immune responses as well as
regulating physiological function in the gut and acting as a neurotransmitter. ...
Histamine receptor H1 causes an increase in phosphoinositol hydrolysis, H2 stimulates gastric acid
secretion, and H3 mediates feedback inhibition of histamine. ...
Antihistamine A H1 antihistamine is a histamine antagonist which serves to reduce or eliminate
effects mediated by histamine, an endogenous chemical mediator released ...
megakaryocyte
Megakaryocyte The megakaryocyte is a bone marrow cell responsible for the production of blood
platelets necessary for normal blood clotting. ...
Thrombopoietin It stimulates the production and differentiation of megakaryocytes, the bone
marrow cells that fragment into large numbers of platelets [1]. ...
Promegakaryocyte The developmental stages of the megakaryocyte are: CFU-Me (pluripotential
hemopoietic stem cell or hemocytoblast) -> megakaryoblast -> promegakaryocyte ...
thromboplastin
Tissue factor Tissue factor, also called thromboplastin, factor III or CD142 is a protein
present in subendothelial tissue, platelets, and leukocytes necessary for the ...
Partial thromboplastin time The partial thromboplastin time (PTT) or activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT
or APTT) is a performance indicator measuring the efficacy of both the ...
Prothrombin time It is used in conjunction with the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT)
... [1] Variations between various thromboplastin preparations have in the ...
--- 9/18/06 Muscular System 2
masseter
Masseter muscle Along with the other three muscles of mastication, the masseter is innervated by
the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve. ...
Zygomasseteric system The rostrum is unmodified and the masseter originates on the ventral zygomatic
surface. ... The masseter lateralis extends forwards onto the rostrum. ...
Mountain Beaver This means that it has no specialized attachments for the masseter muscles as
seen in other rodents. It is flattened and lacks a postorbital process. ...
temporalis
Temporalis muscle As with the other muscles of mastication, control of the temporalis muscle comes
from the third (mandibular) branch of the trigeminal nerve. ...
Squama temporalis Its outer surface is smooth and convex; it affords attachment to the temporalis
muscle, and forms part of the temporal fossa; on its hinder part is a ...
Red-browed Finch The Red-browed Finch Neochmia temporalis is an estrildid finch that inhabits the
east coast of Australia. This species is also been introduced to French ...
trapezius
Trapezius muscle In human anatomy, the trapezius is a large superficial muscle on a person's back.
It is innervated by the accessory nerve (Cranial Nerve 11), ...
Trapezius muscles (cat) The Trapezius muscles are a set of muscles found in mammals. In the cat they are
three thin flat muscles that cover the back, and to a lesser extent, ...
Trapezius muscle In human anatomy, the trapezius is a large superficial muscle on a person's back.
It is innervated by the accessory nerve (Cranial Nerve 11), ...
ligamentum nuchae
Nuchal ligament Outer surface. (Nuchal lines are identified at left.) Seventh cervical vertebra.
(Spinous process visible at bottom.) Latin, ligamentum nuchae ...
Serratus posterior superior muscle It arises by a thin and broad aponeurosis from the lower part of the ligamentum
nuchae, from the spinous processes of the seventh cervical and upper two or ...
Splenius capitis muscle The splenius capitis arises from the lower half of the ligamentum nuchæ, from
the spinousial process of the seventh cervical vertebra, and from the spinous ...
lumbosacral fascia
Human abdomen It originates from Poupart's ligament, the inner lip of the ilium, the lumbar
fascia and the inner surface of the cartilages of the six lower ribs. ...
Anterior cutaneous branches of the femoral nerve - Wikipedia, the ... Beneath the fascia lata, at the lower border of the Adductor longus, it joins to
form a ... Nerves of lower limbs and lower torso: the lumbosacral plexus ...
List of subjects in Gray's Anatomy: Alphabetical: L - Wikipedia ... Lymphatic trunks, lumbar: Gray's page #691 · subclavian: Gray's page #691 Gray's
page #692 · vessels: Gray's page #687 · of abdominal viscera: Gray's page # ...
intertubercular groove
Intertubercular groove The tubercles of the humerus are separated from each other by a deep groove, the
intertubercular groove (bicipital groove, sulcus intertubercular), ...
Upper extremity of humerus The tubercles are separated from each other by a deep groove, the intertubercular
groove (bicipital groove), which lodges the long tendon of the biceps ...
Humerus Pectoralis major, teres major and latissimus dorsi, which all insert at the
intertubercular groove of the humerus, adduct and medially rotate the humerus. ...
deltoid tuberosity
Deltoid tuberosity "An anatomic landmark to simplify subclavian vein cannulation: the "deltoid
tuberosity".". Anesth Analg 100 (3): 623-8, table of contents. PMID 15728041. ...
Body of humerus About its center it forms the anterior boundary of the deltoid tuberosity, on
which the deltoid muscle attaches; below, it is smooth and rounded, ...
Deltoid muscle Insertion: · deltoid tuberosity of humerus ... In human anatomy, the deltoid
muscle is the muscle forming the rounded contour of the shoulder. ...
pectoralis major
Pectoralis major muscle The Pectoralis major is a thick, fan-shaped muscle, situated at the upper
front (anterior) of the chest wall. It makes up the bulk of the chest muscles in ...
Teres major muscle Teres major is a muscle of the upper limb and one of six scapulohumeral muscles.
It is a thick but somewhat flattened muscle. ...
Pectoral muscles (cat) The pectoralis major, also called, pectoralis superficialis, is a broad triangular
portion of the pectoralis muscle which is immediately below the ...
rotator cuff
Rotator cuff The rotator cuff (rotor cuff) is an anatomical term given to the group of muscles
and their tendons that act to stabilize the shoulder. ...
Rotator cuff tear Rotator cuff tears are problems of the rotator cuff muscles of the shoulder.
One or more rotator cuff tendons may become inflamed from overuse, aging, ...
Supraspinatus muscle It is one of the four rotator cuff muscles and also abducts the arm at the shoulder.
The spine of the scapula separates the supraspinatus muscle from the ...
supraspinatus
Supraspinatus muscle The supraspinatus is a relatively small muscle of the upper limb that takes its
name from its origin from the supraspinous fossa superior to the spine of ...
Rotator cuff The most effective is the side-lying abduction, which activates the supraspinatus,
subscapularis and infraspinatus. The side-lying abduction involves the ...
Rotator cuff The most effective is the side-lying abduction, which activates the supraspinatus,
subscapularis and infraspinatus. The side-lying abduction involves the ...
subscapularis
Subscapularis muscle Innervation to subscapularis is supplied by the upper and lower subscapular
nerves, branches of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. ...
Scapula The anterior (front) side of the scapula shows the fossa subscapularis (subscapular
fossa) to which the subscapularis muscle attaches. ...
Scapula The anterior (front) side of the scapula shows the fossa subscapularis (subscapular
fossa) to which the subscapularis muscle attaches. ...
teres minor
Teres minor muscle The Teres minor is a narrow, elongated muscle of the rotator cuff. ... Sometimes a
group of muscle fibres from teres minor may be fused with infraspinatus. ...
Teres major muscle #5 is Teres major muscle #6 is Teres minor muscle ... Teres major is a muscle of
the upper limb and one of six scapulohumeral muscles. ...
Axillary nerve The posterior branch (lower branch) supplies the Teres minor and the posterior
part of the Deltoideus; upon the branch to the Teres minor an oval ...
coracoid process
Coracoid process The coracoid process is a thick curved process attached by a broad base to the
upper part of the neck of the scapula; it runs at first upward and medialward ...
Coracoid A coracoid is a paired bone which is part of the shoulder assembly in all ...
humans) it is non-existent or fused with the scapula as the coracoid process. ...
Coracoacromial ligament When the Pectoralis minor is inserted, as occasionally is the case, into the
capsule of the shoulder-joint instead of into the coracoid process, ...
radial tuberosity
Radial tuberosity (Radial tuberosity visible at center right.) Bones of left forearm. Anterior aspect.
(Radius is bone on right. Radial tuberosity is visible at upper left ...
Upper extremity of radius Beneath the neck, on the medial side, is an eminence, the radial tuberosity; its
surface is divided into a posterior, rough portion, for the insertion of ...
Radial fossa Above the front part of the capitulum is a slight depression, the radial fossa,
... conoid tubercle - trapezoid line - costal tuberosity - subclavian groove ...
infraglenoid
Infraglenoid tubercle (Infraglenoid tubercle labeled at center right.) ... The infraglenoid tubercle
is the part of the scapula to which the long head of the triceps brachii ...
Lateral border of the scapula Immediately below the glenoid cavity is a rough impression, the infraglenoid
tuberosity, about 2.5 cm. in length, which gives origin to the long head of the ...
Scapula Triceps Brachii (long head), origin, infraglenoid tubercle .... angles (superior,
inferior, lateral) - tubercles (infraglenoid, supraglenoid) ...
tubercle
Tubercle This view of the cactus Mammillaria marksiana shows its pattern of prominent
tubercles, with the spines emanating from each tubercle's tip. ...
Pubic tubercle The pubic tubercle (also known as the pubic spine) is a prominent forward-projecting
tubercle on the upper border of the medial portion of the superior ...
Genital tubercle A genital tubercle is a body of tissue which forms in the ventral, caudal region
of mammalian embryos of both sexes, and eventually develops into a phallus. ...
olecranon process
Ulna Proximally, the ulna has a bony process, the olecranon process, a hook-like
structure that fits into the olecranon fossa of the humerus. ...
Upper extremity of ulna ('olecranon process') The olecranon is a large, thick, curved eminence, situated
at the upper and back part of the ulna. It is bent forward at the summit so ...
Anconeus muscle Insertion:, lateral surface of the olecranon process and the superior part of
... can be easily palpated just lateral to the olecranon process of the ulna. ...
supracondylar
Lateral supracondylar ridge Bone: Lateral supracondylar ridge. Left humerus. Anterior view. (Lateral
supracondylar ridge on side at bottom right, but not labeled.) ...
Medial supracondylar ridge The inferior third of the medial border of the humerus is raised into a slight
ridge, the medial supracondylar ridge (or medial supracondylar line), ...
Supracondylar ridges From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to: navigation, search. Supracondylar
ridges can refer to:. Lateral supracondylar ridge · Medial supracondylar ...
ridge
Ridge A ridge is a geological feature that is also known as a Rip in the earth causing
magma to flow out and forming an undersea volcano, it also has geological ...
Battle of Vimy Ridge The Battle of Vimy Ridge was one of the opening battles in a larger British
campaign known as the Battle of Arras during the First World War. ...
Tom Ridge Thomas Joseph Ridge (born August 27, 1945 near Pittsburgh, USA) is an American
politician who served as a member of the United States House of ...
styloid process
Styloid process In anatomy, a styloid process (from Greek stylos, "pillar"), usually serving as
points of attachment for muscles, refers to the slender, pointed process ...
Ulna Proximally, the ulna has a bony process, the olecranon process, a hook-like
structure that fits ... Distally (near the hand), there is a styloid process. ...
Temporal styloid process The styloid process is a slender pointed piece of bone just below the ear.
It projects down and forward from the inferior surface of the temporal bone, ...
thenar eminence
Thenar eminence The thenar eminence is the body of muscle on the palm of the human hand just beneath
... A good way to remember what muscles are in the thenar eminence is ...
Hypothenar eminence Hypothenar eminence. The mucous sheaths of the tendons on the front of the wrist
... thenar and hypothenar muscles (deep) · thenar and hypothenar muscles ...
Thenar eminence A good way to remember what muscles are in the thenar eminence is - "OAF"; oafs
have big thenar eminences. 'O' = opponens, 'A' = abductor, 'F' = flexor. ...
rectus abdominis
Rectus abdominis muscle The rectus abdominis muscle is a paired muscle running vertically on each side
of the anterior wall of the human abdomen (and in some other animals). ...
Human abdomen The human rectus abdominis muscle, part of the human abdomen ... The rectus
abdominis muscles are long and flat. The muscle is crossed by three tendinous ...
Divarication of rectus abdominis muscles - Wikipedia, the free ... The rectus abdominis muscles should meet in the midline at the linea alba.
Superior to the umbilicus, some people have a congenital defect that results in a ...
external oblique
Abdominal external oblique muscle The external oblique muscle (of the abdomen) (also external abdominal oblique
muscle) is the largest and the most superficial (outermost) of the three flat ...
Aponeurosis of the Obliquus externus abdominis - Wikipedia, the ... The spermatic cord in the inguinal canal. (Aponeurosis of external oblique muscle
labeled at bottom center.) Gray's · subject #118 410 ...
Abdominal internal oblique muscle The internal oblique muscle (of the abdomen) is the intermediate muscle of the
abdomen, lying just underneath the external oblique and just above ...
internal oblique
Abdominal internal oblique muscle The internal oblique muscle (of the abdomen) is the intermediate muscle of the
abdomen, lying just underneath the external oblique and just above ...
Transversus abdominis muscle ... the rectus muscle and blend with the posterior lamella of the aponeurosis of
the internal oblique; its lower fourth is in front of the rectus abdominis. ...
Abdominal muscles (cat) There are four abdominal muscles in the cat, namely, External Oblique, Internal
Oblique, Transversus abdominis, and the Rectus Abdominis. ...
transverses
Colorado State Highway 14 It transverses the southern end of the Medicine Bow Mountains at Cameron Pass,
where it enters Larimer County. It descends the pass to the northwest along ...
Kohen ... cataracts; a white streak that transverses the junction between sclera (white
part of the eyeball) and iris; certain types of boils; crushed testicles ...
U.S. Route 34 [edit] Mountain Passes. Route 34 transverses Fall River Pass and Milner Pass in
the Front Range of Colorado. [edit] Nebraska. Main article: U.S. Route 34 in ...
aponeurosis
Aponeurosis The primary regions with thick aponeurosis is in the ventral abdominal region,
the dorsal lumbar region, and in the palmar region. ...
Palmar aponeurosis The palmar aponeurosis (palmar fascia) invests the muscles of the palm, and
consists of central, lateral, and medial portions. ...
Bicipital aponeurosis The bicipital aponeurosis (also known as lacertus fibrosus) is a broad aponeurosis
of the biceps brachii which is located in the cubital fossa of the elbow ...
linea alba
Linea alba The linea alba is a fibrous structure that runs down the midline of the abdomen
in humans and other vertebrates. The name means white line and the linea ...
Human abdomen The lower two-thirds of it insert, in common with fibers of the external oblique
and the underlying transversus abdominis, into the linea alba. ...
Abdominal muscles (cat) Insertion, linea alba, Action, compressor of the abdomen. ... Its fibers are
extremely longitudinal, on each side of the linea alba. ...
tendinous
Tendinous intersection The Rectus abdominis is crossed by fibrous bands, three in number, which are
named the tendinous inscriptions (or tendinous intersections); one is usually ...
Tendinous arch It is termed the tendinous arch or white line of the pelvic fascia, and marks
the line of attachment of the special fascia (pars endopelvina fasciæ pelvis) ...
Bulbospongiosus muscle It consists of two symmetrical parts, united along the median line by a tendinous
raphé. It arises from the central tendinous point of the perineum and from ...
inscription
Epigraphy Epigraphy (Greek, ???????? ? "written upon") is the study of inscriptions or
epigraphs engraved into stone or other durable materials, or cast in metal, ...
Behistun Inscription The Behistun Inscription (also Bisitun or Bisutun, Modern Persian: ?????? ;
Old Persian: Bagastana, meaning "the god's place or land") is a ...
Siloam inscription The Siloam inscription or Silwan inscription (in reference to Jerusalem neighborhood
called Silwan) is a passage of inscribed text originally found in the ...
--- 9/20/06 Muscular System 3
thenar eminence
Thenar eminence The thenar eminence is the body of muscle on the palm of the human hand just beneath
... A good way to remember what muscles are in the thenar eminence is ...
Hypothenar eminence Hypothenar eminence. The mucous sheaths of the tendons on the front of the wrist
... thenar and hypothenar muscles (deep) · thenar and hypothenar muscles ...
Thenar eminence A good way to remember what muscles are in the thenar eminence is - "OAF"; oafs
have big thenar eminences. 'O' = opponens, 'A' = abductor, 'F' = flexor. ...
rectus abdominus
Rectus abdominis muscle The rectus abdominis muscle is a paired muscle running vertically on each side
of the anterior wall of the human abdomen (and in some other animals). ...
Transversus abdominis muscle The muscle runs transverse and is the deepest of the major abdominal muscles (the
others being the rectus abdominis, and the internal and external obliques) ...
Arcuate line (anterior abdominal wall) - Wikipedia, the free ... Superior to the arcuate line, the internal oblique aponeurosis splits to envelope
the rectus abdominis muscle. Inferior to the arcuate line, the internal ...
superior oblique
Superior oblique muscle The superior oblique muscle, or obliquus oculi superior, is a fusiform muscle in
the upper, medial side of the orbit whose primary action is intorsion and ...
Inferior oblique muscle The Obliquus oculi inferior (inferior oblique) is a thin, narrow muscle, placed
near the anterior margin of the floor of the orbit. ...
Trochlea of superior oblique The Trochlea of superior oblique is a pulley structure in the eye through which
the superior oblique muscle passes. [edit] Additional images ...
inferior oblique
Inferior oblique muscle The Obliquus oculi inferior (inferior oblique) is a thin, narrow muscle, placed
near the anterior margin of the floor of the orbit. ...
Extraocular muscles The last muscle is the inferior oblique, which originates at the lower front of
the nasal orbital wall, and passes under the LR to insert on the lateral, ...
Inferior branch of oculomotor nerve The third and longest runs forward between the inferior recti and lateralis to
the inferior oblique. From the last a short thick branch is given off to the ...
transversus
Transversus abdominis muscle The transversus abdominis muscle, also known as the transversalis muscle and
transverse abdominal muscle, is a muscle layer of the anterior and lateral ...
Transversus thoracis muscle The lowest fibers of this muscle are horizontal in their direction, and are
continuous with those of the Transversus abdominis; the intermediate fibers are ...
Transversus perinei superficialis muscle - Wikipedia, the free ... The Transversus perinei superficialis (Transversus perinei; Superficial transverse
perineal muscle) is a narrow muscular slip, which passes more or less ...
tendinous inscriptions
Tendinous intersection The Rectus abdominis is crossed by fibrous bands, three in number, which are
named the tendinous inscriptions (or tendinous intersections); one is usually ...
Rectus abdominis muscle The Rectus is crossed by fibrous bands, three in number, which are named the
tendinous inscriptions. If well-defined, the rectus abdominis is colloquially ...
Sternohyoid muscle Doubling; accessory slips (Cleidohyoideus); absence. It sometimes presents,
immediately above its origin, a transverse tendinous inscription. ...
linea alba
Linea alba The linea alba is a fibrous structure that runs down the midline of the abdomen
in humans and other vertebrates. The name means white line and the linea ...
Human abdomen The lower two-thirds of it insert, in common with fibers of the external oblique
and the underlying transversus abdominis, into the linea alba. ...
Abdominal muscles (cat) Insertion, linea alba, Action, compressor of the abdomen. ... Its fibers are
extremely longitudinal, on each side of the linea alba. ...
anterior iliac spine
Anterior superior iliac spine The anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) is an important landmark of surface
anatomy. It refers to the anterior extremity of the iliac crest of the pelvis, ...
Iliac crest About 5 cm behind the anterior superior iliac spine there is a prominent tubercle
on the outer lip. To the external lip are attached the Tensor fasciæ latæ, ...
Anterior inferior iliac spine Below the Sartorius notch of the anterior border of the ala of the ilium is the
anterior inferior iliac spine, which ends in the upper lip of the acetabulum ...
pubic tubercle
Pubic tubercle The pubic tubercle (also known as the pubic spine) is a prominent forward-projecting
tubercle on the upper border of the medial portion of the superior ...
Superior pubic ramus The upper border presents a prominent tubercle, the pubic tubercle (pubic spine),
which projects forward; the inferior crus of the subcutaneous inguinal ...
Aponeurosis of the Obliquus externus abdominis - Wikipedia, the ... That portion of the aponeurosis which extends between the anterior superior iliac
spine and the pubic tubercle is a thick band, folded inward, ...
aponeurosis
Aponeurosis The primary regions with thick aponeurosis is in the ventral abdominal region,
the dorsal lumbar region, and in the palmar region. ...
Palmar aponeurosis The palmar aponeurosis (palmar fascia) invests the muscles of the palm, and
consists of central, lateral, and medial portions. ...
Bicipital aponeurosis The bicipital aponeurosis (also known as lacertus fibrosus) is a broad aponeurosis
of the biceps brachii which is located in the cubital fossa of the elbow ...
inguinal ligament
Inguinal ligament The inguinal ligament is a band running from the pubic tubercle to the anterior
superior iliac spine. Its anatomy is very important for operating on hernia ...
Reflected inguinal ligament The reflected inguinal ligament (triangular fascia) is a layer of tendinous fibers
of a triangular shape, formed by an expansion from the lacunar ligament ...
Reflex inguinal ligament The Reflex inguinal ligament is a triangular fibrous band that arises from the
lacunar ligament and the pubic bone and passes diagonally upward and medially ...
inguinal canal
Inguinal canal The inguinal canal is a passage in the anterior (toward the front of the body)
abdominal wall which in men conveys the spermatic cord and in women the round ...
Inguinal hernia Inguinal hernias are protrusions of abdominal cavity contents through the inguinal
canal. They are very common and their repair is one of the most ...
Indirect inguinal hernia The testicle remains connected to its blood vessels and the vas deferens, which
make up the spermatic cord and descend through the inguinal canal to the ...
superficial inguinal ring
Superficial inguinal ring In the aponeurosis of the Obliquus externus, immediately above the crest of the
pubis, is a triangular opening, the subcutaneous inguinal ring (superficial ...
Deep inguinal ring The abdominal inguinal ring (internal or deep abdominal ring, deep inguinal ring,
... Inguinal canal · Inguinal hernia · Superficial inguinal ring ...
Crura of superficial inguinal ring The superficial inguinal ring is bounded below by the crest of the pubis; on
either side by the margins of the opening in the aponeurosis, which are called ...
deep inguinal ring
Deep inguinal ring The abdominal inguinal ring (internal or deep abdominal ring, deep inguinal ring,
internal inguinal ring) is the entrance to the inguinal canal. ...
Superficial inguinal ring In the aponeurosis of the Obliquus externus, immediately above the crest of the
pubis, is a triangular opening, the subcutaneous inguinal ring (superficial ...
Crura of superficial inguinal ring The superficial inguinal ring is bounded below by the crest of the pubis; on
either side by the margins of the opening in the aponeurosis, which are called ...
vas deferens
Vas deferens During ejaculation the smooth muscle in the walls of the ductus deferens or vas
deferens contracts reflexively, thus propelling the sperm forward. ...
Congenital absence of the vas deferens - Wikipedia, the free ... Congenital absence of the vas deferens (CAVD) is a condition in which the two
vas deferens, male reproductive organs, fail to form properly prior to birth. ...
Image:Vas deferens.JPG-en.html Image:Vas deferens.JPG-en.html. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to:
navigation, search. No file by this name exists; you can upload it. ...
round ligament
Round ligament In human anatomy, the term round ligament (or its Latin equivalent ligamentum teres)
... Round ligament of uterus, also known as the ligamentum teres uteri ...
Round ligament of uterus The function of the round ligament is maintenance of the anteversion of the
uterus (a position where the fundus of the uterus leans ventrally). ...
Round ligament of liver In anatomy, the round ligament of (the) liver (also commonly known by its Latin
name, ligamentum teres - or more specifically ligamentum teres hepatis as ...
external genitalia
Sex organ Thereafter, the development of the internal reproductive organs and the external
genitalia is determined by hormones produced by certain fetal gonads ...
Sex assignment However, the usual act of assignment carries with it some conscious and unconscious
assumptions, namely that the external genitalia reflect other aspects of ...
Labioscrotal folds The labioscrotal folds (or labioscrotal swellings, or genital swellings) are paired
... HSC - Gonad Descent and Development of External Genitalia II ...
inguinal hernia
Inguinal hernia There are two types of inguinal hernia, direct and indirect. Direct inguinal
hernias occur when abdominal contents herniate through a weak point in the ...
Hernia Inguinal hernias are further divided into the more common indirect inguinal
hernia (2/3, depicted here), in which the inguinal canal is entered via a ...
Indirect inguinal hernia The most common groin hernia, the indirect inguinal hernia is a type of inguinal
hernia which protrudes through the inguinal ring and is ultimately the ...
levator ani
Levator ani The Levator ani arises, in front, from the posterior surface of the superior
ramus of the pubis lateral to the symphysis; behind, from the inner surface of ...
Levator ani The Levator ani arises, in front, from the posterior surface of the superior
ramus of the pubis lateral to the symphysis; behind, from the inner surface of ...
Iliococcygeus muscle Iliococcygeus muscle. Left Levator ani from within. Latin, musculus iliococcygeus
... It is part of the levator ani group of muscles. ...
superficial transversus
Superficial transverse metacarpal ligament - Wikipedia, the free ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Superficial
transverse ligament of the fingers. (Discuss) ...
Superficial transverse ligament of the fingers - Wikipedia, the ... The Superficial Transverse Ligament of the Fingers (or superficial transverse
metacarpal ligament) is a thin band of transverse fasciculi; it stretches ...
List of subjects in Gray's Anatomy: IV. Myology - Wikipedia, the ... Transversus perinæi superficialis (Transversus perinæi; Superficial transverse
perineal muscle); Bulbocavernosus (Sphincter vaginæ) ...
perineal body
Perineal body The perineal body is a fibrous point in the middle line of the perineum. It is
found in both males and females, and it is between the vagina and anus, ...
Perineum The following areas are thus classified as parts of the perineal region: ...
Anatomy of the Human Body. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1918; Bartleby.com, ...
Perineal membrane The perineal membrane is triangular in shape. It attaches to both ischiopubic
rami of the pelvis. It also attaches to the perineal body. ...
median raphe
Median raphe nucleus The median raphe nucleus (or superior central nucleus) is composed of polygonal,
fusiform and pyriform neurons and exists rostral to the nucleus raphe ...
User:Alteripse/workshop3 A similar median raphe can usually be seen from the posterior junction of the
labia to the anus. Internal anatomy, especially the presence or absence of ...
Palatine raphe The palatine raphe (or median raphe) is a raphe running across the palate, from
the palatine uvula to the incisive papilla. ...
urethra
Urethra In anatomy, the urethra is a tube which connects the urinary bladder to the
outside of the body. The urethra has an excretory function in both genders to ...
Perineal urethra A perineal urethra is a human urethral opening that is located on the perineum
rather than at the tip of the phallus. Urethral position is an aspect of ...
The Urethra Chronicles The Urethra Chronicles (2000) was released by the band Blink-182 on May 2, 2000.
A later sequel was released in 2002; The Urethra Chronicles II: Harder ...
vagina
Vagina dentata Vagina dentata is Latin for toothed vagina. The tale is frequently told as a
cautionary tale warning of the dangers of sex with strange women. ...
The Vagina Monologues The Vagina Monologues is an Obie Award-winning episodic play written by Eve Ensler
which ran at the off-Broadway Westside Theatre after a limited run at ...
Vagina The vagina, (from Latin, literally "sheath" or "scabbard" ) is the tubular tract
leading from the uterus to the exterior of the body in female placental ...
gluteal muscles
Gluteal muscles The gluteal muscles are the three muscles that make up the human buttocks.
The gluteal muscles are formed of the gluteus maximus, gluteus minimus and ...
Gluteus maximus muscle The gluteus maximus is the largest and most superficial of the three gluteal
muscles. It makes up a large portion of the shape and appearance of the ...
Absence of gluteal muscle The congenital absence of the gluteal muscle was described in 1976, as occurring
in a brother and sister with absence of gluteal muscles and with spina ...
buttocks
Nevermind the Buttocks "Nevermind the Buttocks" is episode 19 of season 2 of the television show Veronica
Mars. It had an estimated audience size of 1.91 million US viewers on its ...
Buttock augmentation The surgical enlargement of the buttocks through the insertion of a synthetic
implant or through the use of substances like silicone. ...
Mooning Mooning is the act of displaying one's bare buttocks by removing clothing, ...
Moon has been a common shape-metaphor for the buttocks in English since 1743, ...
gluteus maximus
Gluteus maximus muscle The gluteus maximus is the largest and most superficial of the three gluteal
muscles. It makes up a large portion of the shape and appearance of the ...
Gluteal muscles The gluteal muscles are formed of the gluteus maximus, gluteus minimus and gluteus
medius. ... The gluteus maximus is the uppermost of the three muscles, ...
User:Emperor Gluteus maximus User:Emperor Gluteus maximus. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to:
navigation, search. This user is a sock puppet of Dick Witham, ...
gluteus medius
Gluteus medius muscle The gluteus medius, one of the three gluteal muscles, is a broad, thick, radiating
muscle, situated on the outer surface of the pelvis. ...
Gluteus minimus muscle Between the gluteus medius and gluteus minimus are the deep branches of the
superior gluteal vessels and the superior gluteal nerve. ...
Gluteus maximus muscle Gluteus maximus. The gluteus medius and nearby muscles. Structures surrounding
right hip-joint. (Gluteus maximus visible at bottom.) ...
gluteus minimus
Gluteus minimus muscle Between the gluteus medius and gluteus minimus are the deep branches of the
superior gluteal vessels and the superior gluteal nerve. ...
Muscles of the hip The gluteal muscles include the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus,
and tensor fasciae latae. They cover the lateral surface of the ilium. ...
Superior gluteal nerve The superior gluteal nerve is a nerve that originates in the pelvis which supplies
the gluteus medius, the gluteus minimus, and the tensor fasciae latae ...
iliotibial band
Iliotibial band syndrome Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS or ITBFS, for Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome)
is a common thigh injury generally associated with running. ...
Iliotibial tract The iliotibial tract (iliotibial band) is a downward continuation of the ...
The part of the iliotibial band which lies beneath the Tensor fasciæ latæ is ...
Fascia lata This band is continued downward, under the name of the iliotibial band ...
The part of the iliotibial band which lies beneath the Tensor fasciæ latæ is ...
sartorius
Sartorius muscle The sartorius muscle is a long thin muscle that runs down the length of the thigh.
It is the longest muscle in the human body. Its upper portion forms the ...
Sartorius Sartorius is the Latin word for tailor. In history, many people whose name
meant 'tailor' in their own language adopted the surname Sartorius because it had ...
Sartorius (Yu-Gi-Oh! GX) Sartorius, known as Takuma Saiou (????, Sai? Takuma?) in the original Japanese
language version, is a fictional character in the Yu-Gi-Oh! ...
--- 9/22/06 Muscular System 4
iliotibial band
Iliotibial band syndrome Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS or ITBFS, for Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome)
is a common thigh injury generally associated with running. ...
Iliotibial tract The iliotibial tract (iliotibial band) is a downward continuation of the ...
The part of the iliotibial band which lies beneath the Tensor fasciæ latæ is ...
Fascia lata This band is continued downward, under the name of the iliotibial band ...
The part of the iliotibial band which lies beneath the Tensor fasciæ latæ is ...
fascia lata
Fascia lata The deep fascia of the thigh is named, from its great extent, the fascia lata;
it constitutes an investment for the whole of this region of the limb, ...
Tensor fasciae latae The Tensor fasciæ latæ is a tensor of the fascia lata; continuing its action,
the oblique direction of its fibers enables it to abduct the thigh and to ...
Anterior cutaneous branches of the femoral nerve - Wikipedia, the ... The intermediate cutaneous nerve (middle cutaneous nerve) pierces the fascia
lata (and generally the Sartorius) about 7.5 cm. below the inguinal ligament, ...
sartorius
Sartorius muscle The sartorius muscle is a long thin muscle that runs down the length of the thigh.
It is the longest muscle in the human body. Its upper portion forms the ...
Sartorius Sartorius is the Latin word for tailor. In history, many people whose name
meant 'tailor' in their own language adopted the surname Sartorius because it had ...
Sartorius (Yu-Gi-Oh! GX) Sartorius, known as Takuma Saiou (????, Sai? Takuma?) in the original Japanese
language version, is a fictional character in the Yu-Gi-Oh! ...
quadriceps femoris
Quadriceps femoris muscle The quadriceps femoris (quadriceps, quadriceps extensor, or quads) includes the
four prevailing muscles on the front of the thigh. ...
Quadratus femoris muscle The quadratus femoris is a flat, quadrilateral muscle, ... The primary action of
quadratus femoris is external or lateral rotation of the hip, ...
Vastus lateralis muscle The Vastus lateralis (Vastus externus) is the largest part of the Quadriceps
femoris. It arises by a broad aponeurosis, which is attached to the upper part ...
quadriceps tendon
Quadriceps tendon In human anatomy, the quadriceps tendon connects the quadriceps femoris muscles
to the superior aspects of the patella on the anterior of the thigh. ...
Quadriceps femoris muscle All four parts of the quadriceps muscle attach to the patella via the quadriceps
tendon. The quadriceps is also involved in Lombard's Paradox. ...
Rectus femoris muscle All four combine to form the quadriceps tendon, which inserts into the patella
and continues as the patellar ligament.) The Rectus femoris is situated in ...
vastus intermedius
Vastus intermedius muscle The Vastus intermedius (Crureus) arises from the front and lateral surfaces of
the body of the femur in its upper two-thirds and from the lower part of the ...
Vastus medialis The Vastus medialis and Vastus intermedius appear to be inseparably united, but
when the Rectus femoris has been reflected a narrow interval will be ...
Vastus lateralis muscle The Vastus lateralis (Vastus externus) is the largest part of the Quadriceps
femoris. It arises by a broad aponeurosis, which is attached to the upper part ...
vastus medialis
Vastus medialis Vastus medialis has been widely reported to be responsible for extending the leg
the last 10%, however this commonly held claim has no basis, indeed there ...
Vastus intermedius muscle The Vastus medialis and Vastus intermedius appear to be inseparably united, but
when the Rectus femoris has been reflected a narrow interval will be ...
Femoral nerve The branch to the Vastus medialis descends lateral to the femoral vessels ...
Another, derived from the nerve to the Vastus medialis, can usually be traced ...
femoral triangle
Femoral triangle Since the femoral triangle provides easy access to a major artery, coronary
angioplasty is often performed by entering the femoral artery at the femoral ...
Femoral canal The femoral canal is conical and measures about 1.25 cm. in length. The entrance
to the femoral canal is the femoral ring, through which bowel can sometimes ...
Femoral triangle Since the femoral triangle provides easy access to a major artery, coronary
angioplasty is often performed by entering the femoral artery at the femoral ...
tibial tuberosity
Tibial tuperosity advancement procedure - Wikipedia, the free ... Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA) is an orthopedic procedure to repair deficient
cranial cruciate ligaments in dogs. It has also been used in cats. ...
Tuberosity of the tibia Narrow below where the anterior surfaces of the condyles of the tibia end in a
large oblong elevation, the tuberosity of the tibia, which gives attachment ...
Tibia The tibia or shin bone, in human anatomy, is found medial (towards the middle)
... condyle - intercondyloid eminence - tuberosity of the tibia - posterior ...
adductor magnus
Adductor magnus muscle The function of the adductor magnus is to serve as a powerful extensor of the
thigh, along with being able to flex and laterally rotate the thigh. ...
Muscles of the hip The adductor brevis, adductor longus, adductor magnus, pectineus, and gracilis
make up the adductor group. The adductors all orginate on the pubis and ...
Adductor brevis muscle The adductor brevis is a muscle in the thigh situated immediately behind the
pectineus ... pectineus - adductor brevis - adductor longus - adductor magnus ...
hamstrings
Hamstring In human anatomy, a hamstring refers to one of the tendons that makes up the
borders of the space behind the knee. In modern anatomical contexts, however, ...
Weight training exercises 1.1 Quadriceps (front of legs); 1.2 Hamstrings (back of legs); 1.3 Calves.
2 Upper body ... This is an isolation exercise for the hamstrings. ...
Hamstring In human anatomy, a hamstring refers to one of the tendons that makes up the
borders of the space behind the knee. In modern anatomical contexts, however, ...
biceps femoris
Biceps femoris muscle The biceps femoris is a muscle of the posterior thigh. As its name implies, it
has two parts, one of which (the long head) forms part of the hamstrings ...
Biceps femoris tendon avulsion The biceps femoris is commonly injured in sports that require explosive bending
of the knee as seen in sprinting. If the athlete is fatigued or has not ...
Hamstring The short head of the biceps femoris, with its divergent origin and ... The long
head of the biceps femoris extends the hip as when beginning to walk; ...
semimembranosus
Semimembranosus muscle The semimembranosus, so called from its membranous tendon of origin, is situated
at the back and medial side of the thigh. ...
Bursa of the knee joint ... and the tendon of the Semimembranosus and often communicates with the joint;
... a bursa between the tendons of the Semimembranosus and Semitendinosus. ...
Hamstring Semitendinosus and semimembranosus extend the hip when the trunk is ...
posterior compartment/hamstring: biceps femoris - semitendinosus, semimembranosus ...
semitendinosus
Semitendinosus muscle The semitendinosus, remarkable for the great length of its tendon of insertion,
is situated at the posterior and medial aspect of the thigh. ...
Hamstring Semitendinosus and semimembranosus extend the hip when the trunk is ...
posterior compartment/hamstring: biceps femoris - semitendinosus, semimembranosus ...
Hamstring Semitendinosus and semimembranosus extend the hip when the trunk is ...
posterior compartment/hamstring: biceps femoris - semitendinosus, semimembranosus ...
gracilis
Gracilis muscle The Gracilis (Latin: slender) is the most superficial muscle on the medial side
of the thigh. It is thin and flattened, broad above, narrow and tapering ...
Nepenthes gracilis Nepenthes gracilis (Latin: gracilis = thin, slender) is a very common lowland
pitcher plant that is very widespread in the Sunda region. ...
Fasciculus gracilis The fasciculus gracilis (tract of Goll) is wedge-shaped on transverse section,
and lies next the posterior median septum, its base being at the surface of ...
tibialis anterior
Tibialis anterior muscle In human anatomy, the tibialis anterior is a muscle in the shin that spans the
length of the tibia. It originates in the upper two-thirds of the lateral ...
Tibialis posterior muscle As well as being a key muscle for stabilisation, the tibialis posterior muscle
also contracts to produce inversion of the foot and assists in the plantar ...
Body of tibia The lateral surface is narrower than the medial; its upper two-thirds present a
shallow groove for the origin of the Tibialis anterior; its lower third is ...
dorsiflex
Tibialis anterior muscle Its acts to dorsiflex and invert the foot. It is situated on the lateral side of
the tibia; it is thick and fleshy above, tendinous below. ...
Plantar reflex A baby's smaller toes will fan out, and their big toe will dorsiflex slowly.
This happens because the corticospinal pathways (that run from the brain down ...
Massage The other hand is placed around the heel so that the therapist's forearm can be
used to dorsiflex the foot. This is one of the techniques used by sports ...
gastrocnemius
Gastrocnemius muscle The Gastrocnemius (pronounced /?gæs.tr?k?ni.mi.?s/) muscle is a powerful superficial
muscle that is in the back part of the lower leg (the calf). ...
Soleus muscle It is closely connected to the gastrocnemius muscle and some anatomists ...
Superficial to the soleus (closer to the skin) is the gastrocnemius muscle. ...
Achilles tendon The Achilles tendon is the tendonous extension of three muscles in the lower leg:
gastrocnemius, soleus, and plantaris. In humans, the tendon passes behind ...
soleus
Soleus muscle The soleus muscle and surrounding structures, from Gray's Anatomy. This is a view
of the back of the right leg; most of the gastrocnemius muscle has been ...
Gastrocnemius muscle The gastrocnemius is located with the soleus in the superficial posterior ...
Deep to the gastrocnemius (farther from the skin) is the soleus muscle, ...
Achilles tendon The Achilles tendon is the tendonous extension of three muscles in the lower leg:
gastrocnemius, soleus, and plantaris. In humans, the tendon passes behind ...
achilles tendon
Achilles tendon Posterior view of the foot and leg, showing the Achilles tendon (tendo calcaneus).
The gastrocnemius muscle is cut to expose the soleus. ...
Achilles tendon rupture Achilles tendon rupture commonly occurs as an acceleration injury e.g. pushing
off or jumping up. Diagnosis is made by clinical history; typically people ...
Achilles tendonitis Achilles tendonitis is tendonitis of the Achilles tendon, generally precipitated
... The Achilles tendon does not have good blood supply or cell activity, ...
uterus
Uterus The uterus or womb is the major female reproductive organ of most mammals,
including humans. One end, the cervix, opens into the vagina; ...
Artificial uterus In the field of ectogenesis, an artificial uterus (or womb) is a mechanism that
is used to grow an embryo outside of the body of a female organism that ...
Retroverted uterus Female internal reproductive anatomy. Uterus is in slightly anteverted position.
A retroverted uterus would be tilted further backwards. ...
gastrointestinal tract
Gastrointestinal tract The gastrointestinal tract (GI tract), also called the digestive tract, or the
alimentary canal, is the system of organs within multicellular animals that ...
Image:Digestive system diagram.svg The gastrointestinal tract, also called the digestive tract, alimentary canal,
or gut, is the system of organs within multicellular animals that takes in ...
Digestion Fiber helps to keep the food moving through the G.I. tract. The food that cannot
be broken down is called feces. Feces are stored in the rectum until they ...
peristalsis
Peristalsis Peristalsis is the rhythmic contraction of smooth muscles to propel contents
through the digestive tract. The word is derived from New Latin and comes from ...
Peristalsis Peristalsis is the rhythmic contraction of smooth muscles to propel contents
through the digestive tract. The word is derived from New Latin and comes from ...
Retroperistalsis Retroperistalsis is the reverse of the involuntary smooth muscle contractions of
peristalsis. It usually occurs as a precursor to vomiting. ...
iris
Iris (plant) Iris is a genus of between 200-300 species of flowering plants with showy flowers
which takes its name from the Greek word for a rainbow, referring to the ...
Iris (anatomy) The iris is the green/grey/brown area. The other structures visible are the pupil
in the centre and the white sclera surrounding the iris. ...
Iris (mythology) In Greek mythology, Iris is the personification of the rainbow and messenger of
the gods. As the rainbow unites Earth and heaven, Iris links the gods to ...
intercalated disc
Cardiac muscle At high magnification, the intercalated disc's path appears even more convoluted,
... In transverse section, the intercalated disk's appearance is ...
T-tubule Histology at BU 22502loa - "Ultrastructure of the Cell: cardiac muscle, intercalated
disk "; T+tubule at eMedicine Dictionary; Physiology at MCG 2/2ch3/ ...
Sarcomere Actin filaments and Titin molecules are cross-linked in the Z-disc via the Z-line
protein ... cardiac muscle · myocardium, intercalated disc, nebulette ...
sarcolemma
Sarcolemma This means that the sarcolemma is not attached to the cytoskeleton. Therefore during
muscle contraction, the sarcolemma is not synchronized with the ...
Smooth muscle Actin filaments attach to the sarcolemma by focal adhesions or attachment ...
The sarcolemma possess microdomains specialized to cell signalling events and ...
Musculoskeletal system These neurotransmitters diffuse across the synapse and bind to specific receptor
sites on the sarcolemma (cell membrane of the muscle fiber). ...
sarcoplasm
Sarcoplasm The Sarcoplasm of a muscle fiber is comparable to the cytoplasm of other cells,
but it houses unusually large amounts of glycosomes (granules of stored ...
Systole (medicine) At this point, voltage-gated calcium channels on the cell membrane open and allow
calcium ions to pass through, into the sarcoplasm, or interior, ...
Energy systems This all occurs in the sarcoplasm of muscle cells and is said to be anaerobic as
oxygen is not required for it to work. When the intensity of exercise drops ...
myofibril
Myofibril Myofibrils (obsolete term: sarcostyles) are cylindrical organelles, found within
muscle cells. They are bundles of filaments that run from one end of the ...
Image:Myofibril.svg Myofibril.svg? (file size: 11 KB, MIME type: image/svg+xml) ... Retrieved
from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Myofibril.svg" ...
Delayed onset muscle soreness Evidence for myofibril remodeling as opposed to myofibril damage in human muscles
with DOMS: an ultrastructural and immunoelectron microscopic study. ...
myofilaments
Myofilament The filaments of myofibrils constructed from proteins, myofilaments, consist of
2 types ... sarcomere (a, i, and h bands; z and m lines), myofilaments (thin ...
Troponin ... them to form a troponin-tropomyosin complex; Troponin I binds to actin in thin
myofilaments to hold the troponin-tropomyosin complex in place ...
Troponin I It binds to actin in thin myofilaments to hold the troponin-tropomyosin complex
in place. The letter I is given due to its inhibitory character. ...
myosin
Myosin Part of the myosin structure, atoms in the heavy chain are colored red on the
left-hand side, and atoms in the light chains are colored orange and yellow. ...
Myosin light-chain kinase This binding will activate the MLCK which will go on to phosphorylate the myosin
light chain. This will enable the myosin crossbridge to bind to the actin ...
Sliding filament model Myosin is a molecular motor that acts like an active ratchet. Chains of actin
proteins form high tensile passive 'thin' filaments that transmit the force ...
actin
Actin Actin is a globular structural, 42-47 kDa protein found in many eukaryotic cells,
with concentrations of over 100 ?M. It is also one of the most highly ...
Actin-binding protein 1 A Actin-Binding Proteins (and Drugs); 2 B Actin-Binding Proteins ....
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actin-binding_protein" ...
Microfilament Actoclampins are the actin filament (+)-end-tracking molecular motors that generate
... The term actoclampin is generic and applies to all actin filament ...
--- 11/8/06 Lecture 29 Eye
choroid
Choroid The choroid, also known as the choroidea or choroid coat, is the vascular layer
of the eye lying between the retina and the sclera, with a thickness about ...
Choroid plexus The choroid plexus is the area on the ventricles of the brain where cerebrospinal
fluid (CSF) is produced by modified ependymal cells. ...
Choroid plexus cyst The brain contains pockets or spaces called ventricles with a spongy layer of
cells and blood vessels called the choroid plexus. ...
ciliary body
Ciliary body The ciliary body is the circumferential tissue inside the eye composed of the
ciliary muscle and ciliary processes. [1] It is part of the uveal tract?the ...
Ciliary body melanoma Ciliary Body Melanoma is a type of cancer arising from the coloured part (uvea)
of the eye. About 12% of uveal melanoma arise from the ciliary body. ...
Uvea (anatomy) It is traditionally divided into 3 or 4 regions, the iris, ciliary body, pars
plana and choroid. These distinctions are based on their different structures ...
suspensory ligament
Suspensory ligament In horses, the suspensory ligament is part of the suspensory apparatus of the leg.
It supports the fetlock joint when the leg is supporting the horse's ...
Suspensory ligament of the penis In males, the suspensory ligament of the penis is attached to the pubic symphysis,
which holds the penis close to the pubic bone and supports it when erect. ...
Suspensory ligament of the ovary The suspensory ligament of the ovary (also infundibulopelvic ligament) is a fold
of peritoneum [2] that extends out from the ovary to the wall of the pelvis ...
sciera
Did you mean sierra?
Percina Roanoke darter, Percina roanoka (Jordan & Jenkins, 1889). Dusky darter, Percina
sciera (Swain, 1883). River darter, Percina shumardi (Girard, 1859). ...
Darter (fish) Roanoke darter, Percina roanoka (Jordan & Jenkins, 1889). Dusky darter, Percina
sciera (Swain, 1883). River darter, Percina shumardi (Girard, 1859). ...
Percidae Roanoke darter, Percina roanoka (Jordan & Jenkins, 1889). Dusky darter, Percina
sciera (Swain, 1883). River darter, Percina shumardi (Girard, 1859). ...
cornea
Cornea The cornea is the transparent front part of the eye that covers the iris, pupil,
and anterior chamber, providing most of an eye's optical power. ...
Doina Cornea Doina Cornea (born 30 May 1929, Bra?ov) is a Romanian human rights activist and
professor of the French language. She was notable as a dissident during the ...
Corneal transplantation Cornea transplant approximately one week after surgery. .... The first cornea
transplant was performed in 1905, by Eduard Zirm, making it one of the first ...
canals of Schlemm
Schlemm's canal Schlemm's canal, also known as canal of Schlemm or the scleral venous sinus, is
a circular channel in the eye that collects aqueous humor from the anterior ...
Image:Eye-diagram no circles border.svg - Wikipedia, the free ... English: 1:posterior chamber 2:ora serrata 3:ciliary muscle 4:ciliary zonules
5:canal of Schlemm 6:pupil 7:anterior chamber 8:cornea 9:iris 10:lens cortex ...
Image:Eye-diagram.svg English: 1:posterior chamber 2:ora serrata 3:ciliary muscle 4:ciliary zonules
5:canal of Schlemm 6:pupil 7:anterior chamber 8:cornea 9:iris 10:lens cortex ...
glaucoma
Glaucoma The white cup is a pit with no nerve fibers. As glaucoma advances, the cup enlarges
until it occupies most of the disc area. Courtesy AgingEye Times ...
Glaucoma valve There are also several different glaucoma drainage implants. These include the
original Molteno implant (1966), the Baerveldt tube shunt, or the valved ...
Glaucoma surgery Glaucoma is a group of diseases affecting the optic nerve that results in vision
loss and is frequently characterized by raised intraocular pressure (IOP). ...
anterior chamber
Anterior chamber The anterior chamber is the fluid-filled space inside the eye between the iris
and the cornea's innermost surface, the endothelium. ...
Posterior chamber ... ligament of the lens and the ciliary processes the Posterior Chamber consists
of small space directly posterior of the Iris but anterior to the lens. ...
Aqueous humour It flows through the narrow cleft between the front of the lens and the back of
the iris, to escape through the pupil into the anterior chamber, ...
posterior chamger
Did you mean posterior chamber?
aqueous humor
Aqueous humour Aqueous humour fills these spaces within the anterior segment to provide nutrients
to the lens and corneal endothelium, and its pressure maintains the ...
Schlemm's canal Schlemm's canal, also known as canal of Schlemm or the scleral venous sinus, is
a circular channel in the eye that collects aqueous humor from the anterior ...
Glaucoma surgery There are many glaucoma surgeries, and variations or combinations of those
surgeries, that facilitate the escape of excess aqueous humor from the eye to ...
cataract
Cataract A cataract is an opacity that develops in the crystalline lens of the eye or in
its envelope. Early on in the development of age-related cataract the power ...
Cataracts of the Nile The six primary cataracts of the Nile are shallow stretches between Aswan and
Khartoum where the water's surface is broken by numerous small boulders and ...
Cataract surgery Cataract surgery is the removal of the lens of the eye (also called "crystalline")
that has developed an opacification, which is referred to as a cataract. ...
tarsal plates
Tarsus (eyelids) The tarsi (tarsal plates) are two thin, elongated plates of dense connective ...
The superior tarsus (tarsus superior; superior tarsal plate), the larger, ...
List of subjects in Gray's Anatomy: X. The Organs of the senses ... superior tarsus (tarsus superior; superior tarsal plate); inferior tarsus (tarsus
inferior; inferior tarsal plate). [edit] Gray's page #1026 ...
Levator palpebrae superioris muscle It inserts on the skin of the upper eyelid, as well as the superior tarsal plate.
It is a skeletal muscle. The superior tarsal muscle, a smooth muscle, ...
tarsal glands
Meibomian gland The meibomian glands (or tarsal glands) are a special kind of sebaceous glands
at the rim of the eyelids, responsible for the supply of sebum, ...
Lacrimal gland Sympathetic connections of the sphenopalatine and superior cervical ganglia.
The tarsal glands, etc., seen from the inner surface of the eyelids. ...
White-tailed deer The tarsal glands are found on the lower outside of each hind leg. Scent is
deposited from these glands when deer walk through and rub against vegetation. ...
conjunctiva
Conjunctiva Bulbar or ocular conjunctiva: The conjunctiva covering the eyeball, over the sclera.
This region of the conjunctiva is bound tightly and moves with the ...
Plica semilunaris of the conjunctiva - Wikipedia, the free ... Plica semilunaris of the conjunctiva. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ...
[edit] External links. semilunar+conjunctival+fold at eMedicine Dictionary ...
Pterygium Pterygium usually refers to a benign growth of the conjunctiva. ... When associated
with the conjunctiva, a pterygium commonly grows from the nasal side of ...
conjunctivitis
Conjunctivitis Conjunctivitis (commonly called "pinkeye" or bloodshot eyes in the USA and "Madras
Eye" in India) is an inflammation of the conjunctiva (the outermost layer ...
Allergic conjunctivitis Allergic conjunctivitis is inflammation of the conjunctiva (the membrane covering
the white part of the eye) due to allergy. ...
Actinic conjunctivitis Actinic conjunctivitis is an eye condition contracted from prolonged exposure to
Actinic (ultraviolet) rays. Symptoms are redness and swelling of the eyes. ...
cristae
Crista Cristae (singular crista) are the internal compartments formed by the inner
membrane of a mitochondrion. They are studded with proteins, including ATP ...
Crista Cristae (singular crista) are the internal compartments formed by the inner
membrane of a mitochondrion. They are studded with proteins, including ATP ...
Mitochondrion There is the outer membrane, the intermembrane space (the space between the outer
and inner membranes), the inner membrane, the cristae space (formed by ...
maculae
Macula (planetary geology) Macula (pl. maculae) is the Latin word for 'spot'. It is used in planetary geology
to refer to unusually dark areas on the surface of a planet or moon. ...
List of geological features on Triton - Wikipedia, the free ... 1 Cavi; 2 Craters; 3 Dorsa (ridges); 4 Fossae (ditches); 5 Maculae (dark spots
... Tritonian maculae are named after water spirits from various mythologies. ...
List of geological features on Titan - Wikipedia, the free ... 2 Arc?s; 3 Craters; 4 Faculae; 5 Lacus; 6 Maculae; 7 Ring features; 8 Virgae ...
Titanian maculae (dark spots) are named after deities of happiness, peace, ...
semicircular canals
Semicircular canal The semicircular canals are three half-circular, interconnected tubes located
inside each ear that are the equivalent of three gyroscopes located in three ...
Superior semicircular canal The superior semicircular canal (anterior semicircular canal), 15 to 20 mm.
in length, is vertical in direction, and is placed transversely to the long axis ...
Horizontal semicircular canal It measures from 12 to 15 mm., and its arch is directed horizontally backward
and lateralward; thus each semicircular canal stands at right angles to the ...
vertibule
organ of Corti
Organ of Corti The organ of Corti (or spiral organ) is the organ in the inner ear of mammals
that contains auditory sensory cells, or "hair cells." ...
Cochlea The hair cells are arranged in four rows in the organ of Corti along the entire
length of the cochlear coil. Three rows consist of outer hair cells (OHCs) ...
Stereocilia (inner ear) As acoustic sensors in mammals, stereocilia are lined up in the Organ of Corti
within the cochlea of the inner ear. In hearing, stereocilia transform the ...
cochlea
Did you mean cochlear?
Cochlea The cochlea is the auditory portion of the inner ear. Its core component is the
Organ of Corti, the sensory organ of hearing, which is distributed along the ...
Cochlear implant A cochlear implant (CI) is a surgically implanted electronic device that provides
a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard of ...
Aqueduct of cochlea Bone: Aqueduct of cochlea. Left temporal bone. Inferior surface. (Aquæductus
cochleæ labeled at left, fifth from the top.) ...
pinna
Pinna The pinna (Latin for feather) is the visible part of the ear that resides outside
of the head (this may also be referred to as the auricle or auricula). ...
Rosh Pinna Rosh Pinna is a town (local council) in the North District of Israel. It was
founded in 1882 by thirty immigrant families from Romania, making it one of the ...
Christophe Pinna Christophe Pinna is a member of the French National Karate team. He is a multi-time
World Champion. He is well known for his roundhouse kicks. ...
auricle
Auricle Auricle of barley (Hordeum vulgare). A small conical pouch that projects from
each atrium of the ... Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auricle" ...
Left auricular appendix The left auricular appendix (left auricula, left auricle) is a conical muscular
pouch connected to the left atrium of the heart. It is somewhat constricted ...
Right auricular appendix The right auricular appendix (right auricula, right auricle) is a small conical
muscular pouch attached to the right atrium of the heart. ...
cerumen
Earwax Earwax, also known by the medical term cerumen, is a yellowish, waxy substance
... Excessive cerumen may impede the passage of sound in the ear canal, ...
User:Reywas92/Trivia The thing that casts a shadow on a sundial is called a gnomon. The medical term
for earwax is cerumen. Stomach growling should be called borborygmus. ...
User:Pizza1512/Facts The medical term for earwax is cerumen. Stomach growling should be called borborygmus.
Another word for burping is eructation. Yawning and stretching after ...
tympanic membrane
Eardrum The tympanic membrane, colloquially known as the eardrum, ... As a result, the
tympanic membrane is one of very few adult structures that is derived from ...
Umbo of tympanic membrane The tympanic membrane viewed from within. The malleus has been resected immediately
beyond its lateral process, in order to show the tympanomalleolar folds ...
Perforated eardrum Rupture or perforation (hole) of the eardrum can occur in infection, trauma (e.g.
by trying to clean the ear with sharp instruments), explosion or loud ...
malleus
Malleus The right membrana tympani with the hammer and the chorda tympani, viewed from
within, from behind, and from above. (Malleus visible at center.) ...
Malleus Maleficarum Cover of the seventh Cologne edition of the Malleus Maleficarum, 1520 (from the
University of Sydney Library). The Latin title is "MALLEUS MALEFICARUM, ...
Daemonhunters The Ordo Malleus was founded after the end of the Horus Heresy to prevent any
... The Ordo Malleus concerns itself with the daemonic threat that faces the ...
incus
Incus The incus or anvil is the anvil-shaped small bone or ossicle in the middle ear.
It connects the malleus to the stapes. It was first described by Alessandro ...
Incus Records Incus Records is an artist owned record label, founded by Derek Bailey, Tony
Oxley and Evan Parker, specialising in the dissemination of free-improvised ...
Cumulonimbus incus A cumulonimbus incus (Latin incus, "anvil") is a cumulonimbus cloud which has
reached the level of stratospheric stability and has formed the characteristic ...
stapes
Stapes The stapes or stirrup is the stirrup-shaped small bone or ossicle in the middle
ear which attaches the incus to the fenestra ovalis, the "oval window" which ...
Middle ear [1] The vibratory portion of the tympanic membrane is many times the surface area
of the footplate of the stapes; furthermore, the shape of the articulated ...
Stapes The stapes or stirrup is the stirrup-shaped small bone or ossicle in the middle
ear which attaches the incus to the fenestra ovalis, the "oval window" which ...
tensor tympani
Tensor tympani The medial wall and part of the posterior and anterior walls of the right tympanic
cavity, lateral view. (Label for "Tensor tympani muscle" is at right, ...
Middle ear The movement of the ossicles may be stiffened by two muscles, the stapedius and
tensor tympani, which are under the control of the facial nerve and ...
The Hum [edit] The tensor tympani muscle making the eardrum tremble ... (The tensor
tympani is a muscle within the inner ear for tightening the eardrum. ...
stapedius
Stapedius The stapedius is the smallest striated muscle in the human body. At just over
one millimeter in length, its purpose is to stabilize the smallest bone in the ...
Nerve to the stapedius The Nerve to the Stapedius (tympanic branch) arises opposite the pyramidal eminence.
It passes through a small canal in this eminence to reach the muscle. ...
Acoustic reflex The acoustic reflex (or stapedius reflex) is an involuntary muscle ... In humans
the vocalization-induced stapedius reflex reduces sound pressure levels ...